Monday Slog

November 13th, 2017 | 3:15 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

Late one today. Photo via @lottiesskateshop.

Eternal Youth in Tompkins Square” is a New York Times style section feature documenting many of the new(ish) faces around T.F. these past couple years, shot by our friend Danny Weiss, with words from Ted Barrow, the skater who Jason Byoun would show his mom if she asked what skateboarding was.

The Times also did this feature on hill bombing in S.F. with GX1000 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

“I didn’t want to go to school or work at some grocery store, wherever you work when you’re 16. Fuck it, I’ll go to Russia!” (Umm…) The Chrome Ball Incident got ahold of the otherwise interview-evasive Anthony Van Englen.

“This spot is long gone. We called them ‘Chelsea Banks’ because they were on the West Side Highway in Chelsea, directly across the highway from, what is today, the Chelsea Piers Skatepark. Today this spot is a little green triangular park, but back then it was a shit show.” TWS interviewed original Zoo York co-founder, Eli Gesner, and original Shut rider, Jeremy Henderson, about filming Mark Gonzales during the first time he ever came to New York in 1987.

Apparently, the only difference between a 2003 skate shoe and a 2017 skate shoe is the sole. Village Psychic and Lurker Lou did a wear test for Jason Dill’s Mosaic era DVS pro model.

Here’s volume 24 of LurkNYC’s “New York Times” outtakes series. The gap noseslide on the metal step behind Union Square was sick.

The Bunt’s latest is with Drop-In Skatepark alumni, Dick Rizzo, and Skate Muzik’s latest is a Welcome to Hell-themed episode with Beatrice Domond.

The Theories boys went to Chicago.

Calzone is Matt Velez’s sequel to Sable, due to premiere in Brooklyn on November 30th. Full parts from Mark Humienik, Nick Ferro, et al. Flyer here. Small teaser here.

Midtown’s most photogenic ledge spot is back like it never left.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Dirk, we love you, but this is too funny.

Quote of the Week
Observant Gentleman: “It’s crazy you ride for Polar but aren’t good at wallies.”
Hjalte Halberg: “Yeah, but at least I learned no complys recently.”

Happy birthday Z ♥ No matter the years, this part doesn’t get any less insane.

The Ian Reid Archive — Volume 2

September 18th, 2013 | 5:50 am | Features & Interviews | 12 Comments

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Here is the second installment of Ian’s largely unseen behind-the-scenes photos from the early 2000s. Once again, the interview was done by our friend Ted Barrow, and all the photos are Ian’s. Maybe a part three down the line, who knows?

You can check out Ian’s current work on TheClermont.Tumblr.com. If you missed it, the first installment from August can be found here. And for all you office job people, there’s a photo towards the end that might be NSFW. Not really sure how that stuff works, but consider this a warning. Big thanks to Ted and Ian.

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This looks like the optimism of youth…

This is like the no money, the un-jaded, the still hungry on the skate tip, Jereme Rogers and Brian Wenning in cahoots at a skatespot. You can tell they’re having a good time: Brian is fascinated by Jereme’s GIRL chain, and um, nice watch with designer jewelry, TSA shirt…

No tattoos!

Oh yeah, there’s no graffiti…I mean no tattoos on any of ‘em. Definitely transitional. If you’re reading this — you know about the transition. You know what they’ve become. Still two of my favorites on a lot of levels, but you know what they’ve become. This is what they were. There’s proof, because I lived it. This is who they were.

One of many steps to who they became…

Yeah, baby steps.

The Ian Reid Archive — Volume 1

August 14th, 2013 | 7:27 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

ian archive

Ian Reid has a stockpile of largely unseen skate photographs from the early-to-mid-2000s. They are not so much photographs of actual skateboarding, as they are candid documentation of behind-the-scenes moments to many mythologized skaters and videos from that era. Our friend Ted Barrow recently began sifting through Ian’s photos, and sat down with him for some commentary on a few key selections. As there are hundreds of these, expect a volume two post, and a potentially larger archival project down the line. You can check out Ian’s current photo work here.

Thanks to Ian for sharing the photos, and to Ted for the accompanying interview.

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When was this taken, and who took it?

Brian Wenning took this photo of me doing a one-foot ollie on Wall Stree. I’m still skating in Air Force 1s, so maybe in like 1999, because that’s Chris Camillo sitting right there.

Who’s he?

Loudmouth New Yorker, skateboarder from Staten Island. He was great, I loved him.

So what is it, a one-foot down the seven stairs then a drop?

Yeah, you land on that platform and roll off. It’s high.

I remember walking by that building, and someone was like, “Ian Reid rolled off of that thing…”

Yeah, the thing I rolled off was actually next to it. I don’t know what I was thinking, but yeah. This was a different thing. You ollie, land, then roll off.

That does not look fun.

No, that wasn’t fun.

TRENDWATCH 2012: Is This 2013’s Biggest T-Shirt?

June 28th, 2012 | 12:27 pm | Daily News | 26 Comments

For the second year in a row, the Palace triangle has dominated graphic tee shirt marketshare at Tompkins Square Park. That does nothing to stop eager trend forecasters from looking for the *next big thing* in the awfully difficult-to-predict world of graphic tee shirts.

A prominent Upper West Side ex-Lurker wearing a shirt to support his neighborhood gourmet / kosher grocer (pictured above, top left) is nothing out of the ordinary, but leading analysts have started to see this particular garment increase in visibility throughout the past six-month cycle of skate footage. Its most notable appearance was in a Barcelona-set Mark Suciu throwaway clip. Now that the shirt has been adopted by west coasters with east coast sensibilities, analysts scramble to determine if this 80th & Broadway establishment’s sole foray into graphic tees could dethrone the current London-based triangular juggernaut, and return a sizable piece of the market back to New York’s local economy (previously occupied by Autumn.)

If optimistic projections hold true, and this garment gains traction into our summer 2013 trend report, the implications would be immense. It would make Zabar’s the first kosher skate apparel company, possibly resulting in increased Jewish investment within skateboarding. Also, other New York-based grocers like Fairways, Gristedes, and even low-end outfits like C-Town and Associated would have no choice but to play catch-up in this largely untapped market.

Spring in January

January 25th, 2012 | 12:10 am | Quarter-Diary | No Comments

Today was sick.

Instagram: @quartersnacks

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