The Best Skate Video Parts of the 2010s — QS Reader Survey Results

Illustration by Cosme Studio

Back in October, we asked QS visitors to choose their favorite video parts of the 2010s. If civilization and skateboarding were to end today, which five parts would you bury in a weather-and-nuclear-proof time capsule for post-apocalyptic earth dwellers to reference when they rediscover skate culture of these past ten years?

QS prides itself as being a destination for people who think a lot about skateboarding. Rather than poll a few close colleagues for their favorites, we felt we had a wide enough reverberation in the skate nerd universe to try and crowdsource a canon of the 2010s from anyone willing to sit down and think about it. I can emphatically say that in reviewing the mountain of ballots, everyone took their votes seriously — save maybe the guy who voted for five Micky Papa parts.

As we tallied the results, consistent trends in the count were apparent. Any fears about a recency bias went out the window; there’s only one part from 2019, and the average year of the top 25 is 2014. QS obviously has its own breed of skate nerd audience — this poll would look different if taken by Thrasher or Free — but I would bet that their lists wouldn’t be TOO far off from this one.

Presented without comment for the top 25-11, and then via a lot of favors from writer friends on the internet for the top 10: here are the 25 best video parts of the past ten years.

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Five Favorite Parts With Dom Henry

Intro by Farran Golding
Still from Cottonopolis by Sean Lomax

My introduction to Dom Henry’s skating was through a Live Skateboard Media part in 2015, but to the uninitiated, his parts in Cottonopolis, Afterbang and NEXT are all good places to start.

Dom’s technicality stems from a youth spent learning to skate in Reading, England, where there were car parks and not much else. After moving to Manchester later in life, Dom’s ledge abilities thrived on the black marble of Urbis plaza (Northern England’s answer to Love Park.) He possesses the ability to make intricate skateboarding exude a “less is more” quality due to his unmistakable shapes and flick. Graceful, stretched out and sharp — it’s one of those nuances to which description won’t do justice. Here are five sections that inspired him along the way.

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A Different Glory — Dime Live At Stadium

The night before Dime’s Live At Stadium event, a skateboarder who you probably follow on Instagram made a facetious observation: “There’s not even any money this time, just glory. What’s the point?”

He was right on one count. Yes, there were no cash prizes being given out, but glory — at least that branded form of Glory™ that is only awarded at the Dime Glory Challenge — was not on the table either. One of Dime’s founders was explicit in his proclamation that this is not the Glory Challenge. The fleeting sense of glory that proceeds all skateboard feats was obviously anyone’s for the taking. Eternal Glory™ requires Joe Valdez to be present, and he was in California.

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Frozen in Carbonite Presents — Song of the Summer x Video Part of the Summer 2019: Sponsored by Popeye’s

Words by Frozen in Carbonite

It was the best of chicken sandwiches; it was the worst of chicken sandwiches.

At press time, I have yet to experience the already-legendary Popeye’s chicken sandwich. The saga — almost Dickensian, if you will — continues. First, I called around to see which area franchises carried the sandwich to no avail. When I inquired as to when it would become available, they responded with some variation of “whenever the owner decides to sell the sandwich.”

I felt like a schlub, like I was calling around on a Jordan release date asking, “uhhhh when are y’all gettin’ a restock?” In the subsequent weeks, the sandwich has taken my area by storm, leading to football-field-long drive-thru lines and signs that flat-out say: “WE ARE OUT OF CHICKEN SANDWICHES.”

Like I said, the saga continues…

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Unforgettable — The Oral History of the Twin Towers in Skate Photos

Intro + Interviews by Adam Abada
Header Collage by Requiem For A Screen

The World Trade Center — with its centerpiece, the Twin Towers — opened just a few months before the Knicks won their second championship in 1973, and symbolized a new, modernized era of New York City. As literal twins, the Towers are excellent symbols for the push and pull of capital versus culture which, by the 70s, was really coming to a head in American society. They were the biggest buildings in the world and just one wasn’t even enough.

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