Homies Network — An Interview With Kei, Kyota, Mark & Sully

Photo by Mark Custer

A crew’s first video is always an experiment. It is an experiment in finding the tone, the pacing, and even the overall understanding from everybody that yes, you’re making a video. Everyone in The Homies Video would have started skating after Instagram came around, but it didn’t affect the idea that there is something unifying and special about creating a full-on video. We chatted with Kei (the video’s filmer + editor), Mark (the crew’s photographer), and Kyota + Sully (both of whom have full parts in it) about what it was like filming for the first Homies Network video.

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How did all of you meet each other?

Kei: I’ve known Kyota almost since birth. My parents moved here from Japan around the same time as his [moved from Japan]. We were both born here, and we lived like two blocks apart. I was best friends with his older brother, who is 20, and I’m 18.

Sully moved from Florida, and started skating with Kyota and them. It’s really just mutual friends between everyone. I’ve known Mark through his Instagram and his photography. I asked him to take some photos for the video.

What is Homies Network?

Kei: It’s me filming my friends. Everyone in the video is one of my favorite skaters. I took my parents old TRV-820 because I didn’t have any money to buy a new camera. I wanted to make something small — like, a short video, and it turned out to be way bigger than it was.

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Five Favorite Parts With Cyrus Bennett

Photo by Ben Colen

Skateboarding has unavoidable surface-level parts that trace back to their modern counterparts, and there are always some “that makes sense” thoughts when doing the Five Faves interviews. (Gino going heavy with the mini ramp skating is perhaps one of the few genuine off-guard ones.) For example, everyone thinks to mention Huf and Reese when talking about dudes who honed four or five things to absolute perfection, but there’s always room to go a bit deeper, e.g. Donger deserves to be brought up in that conversation just as fast.

We’ve pretty much posted every video Cyrus has been in since his Mama’s Boys part went online in 2013, so these all “made sense” — but will say that none of them were obvious ;)

Request line is always open!

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#TRENDWATCH2019 in the Form of a QS Travelogue — Athens, Greece

No, where are not above using an iPhone pic of a sunset for a headline image ;)

Truth be told, 80% of skate trips go to the same dozen places. When there’s an uptick in coverage from a new one, it’s no different than noticing a trick return to fashion, or everyone’s pants cuffs starting to homogenize. And lately, a lot of crews have been going to Greece. Not to say that skaters visiting Greece is some new phenomenon — just that this past year has felt like it produced a new “Trip to Athens!” clip each month.

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An Interview With Gangcorp Videographer, Naquan Rollings

Intro & Interview by Adam Abada
Photos by Mac Shafer

Gang Corp is an organically formed group of friends, born of their love for skating and curiosity for the world, and aided by social media — but not governed by it. Fort Greene native Naquan Rollings just released their second full-length video, Black Business, which is their best yet. We hit him up to try and get some insight into the ingredients and process behind Gang Corp doing what they do.

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Where are you from, and how old are you?

I was born in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. I actually just moved — I live in East New York now. I’ve lived in Brooklyn my whole life. I turned 21 last September. I’m getting old super fast. I still feel like I’m 18.

When did you start skating?

That’s always a weird question that I can never really answer. I remember when I was around 10 years old, I had a board but didn’t take it seriously. If it wasn’t for my sister, I don’t know if I would’ve gotten into it. She’s 10 years older than me. When she was in school, she knew about Supreme and all that stuff. She kind of put me on, I guess you can say.

She always wanted a skateboard and my grandma ended up getting her one of those fake ones from Target. I would just ride around on it. I thought I was never gonna try all that trick shit, but I guess the more I was on it, the more I wanted to. I would start meeting people around Fort Greene who skated. I lived right across the street from the park, so anytime people came to skate it, I would hear it from my window, then would go outside and check it out.

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Five Favorite Parts With Jacob Harris

Photo by Alex Pires

Past generations of skateboarders outside the U.S. felt like they kept one eye on America, the unavoidable center of skateboarding’s media and industry, and another inward on their native scenes. British skateboarding, on the other hand, felt like it had to look three ways: towards America, around its European neighbors, and at itself, as a place that produced distinctly English skate videos that looked unlike anything else.

It is tempting to call Jacob Harris’ “Atlantic Drift” series on Thrasher the most beloved video franchise coming out of the U.K. today. Except the videos are less an insular sum of their influences, and more a global portrait of a particular brand of skateboarding, as seen through an English lens. It was no surprise that Jacob’s influences came from all over the place ;)

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