Dreamer — An Interview With Jahmal Williams

Intro & Interview by Adam Abada
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photos by Cole Giordano & Pep Kim

Jahmal Williams is as humble as he is effortlessly flowing on his skateboard. He is someone with thoughtful personal aesthetics that you could never mistake for pretension. That translates into his effects on skate culture — one that he has been a part of for many decades now. A painter, sculptor and connoisseur of 180 nosegrinds, Jahmal is also a father and runs his own cult favorite brand, Hopps.

“Keep It Moving” isn’t only Hopps’ slogan, but a philosophy that keeps Jahmal relevant and creating great work. With a mind and personal history that exemplifies striking while the iron is hot, Jahmal’s new mural and accompanying short is the type of pandemic-era work that reveals how constantly evolving he is.

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The Age of the COVIDeo — An Interview With Jon Colyer About ‘Sanitizer’

Interview by Adam Abada
Original Photos by Jason Miller & Adam Concannon

The COVID age has coincided with a boom in local skate videography. The past year has given us incredible, fully-realized projects from places like Dallas, Pittsburgh, the eastern half of Connecticut — there were two full-length Seattle videos in the same week last year.

It’s not that these places wouldn’t have been producing great videos if not for the pandemic, just that through some combination of unemployment, no travel diluting the local color of the footage, and the time to take second and third looks at spots that have been passed on before gave the last year’s crop of hometown videos a sharper vision than ever before.

Jon Colyer‘s Sanitizer was one of those projects. Portland is a place with no shortage of skateboard mythology — and while there are influences from Dane Brady, Matt Beach, and the D.I.Y. culture that the city is know for, the video felt out of left field, stacked with skaters you likely never heard of, and spots you have never seen.

We had Adam track down its creator to talk about how Sanitizer came to be.

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Five Favorite Parts With Chris Jones

Intro + Interview by Farran Golding
Collage by Requiem For A Screen
Portrait by Reece Leung
Backside Flip Photo by Sam Ashley

Chris Jones began to make an impression on the U.K. scene during the mid-to-late-2000s with an appearance in a promo for Crayon Skateboards. Moving to London from Bristol after graduating university (and having met Jacob Harris on a trip while studying), his part in Eleventh Hour – coupled with a place on the upstart Isle team — positioned Chris as one in a new generation of household names for British skateboarding alongside Harris and his co-star, Tom Knox. Vase came two years later, bringing wide acclaim for all involved, which Chris doubled down on via Colin Read’s Spirit Quest before properly wading into international waters with “Atlantic Drift” crew.

Struggling to narrow down twenty years of video consumption into five, Chris opted to hone in on a handful from his formative years growing up in the small Welsh village of Coychurch.

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Spotlight Chicago — An Interview With Mark Dunning About Deep Dish & ‘Terminal’

Intro & Interview by Mike Munzenrider
Photos by Mark Dunning, Alex Hupp, Frank Verges & Mike Heikkila

It’s rare that a skate video is so clearly evocative of the time in which it was made. There’s a sense of pandemic emptiness that runs through Terminal, Deep Dish’s latest video, nearly all shot in 2020.

Mark Dunning, lead filmer and editor of the Deep Dish series — now up to eight titles — says one of the reasons he makes videos is to shine a light on Chicago skateboarding, because he says it doesn’t get the attention it deserves. He also says he’d long sought a particular shot of Chicago, showing it as “deserted or forgotten,” something which he says that he finally achieved in Terminal. Perhaps that purposeful emptiness was heightened by the past year.

It was under COVID-19 conditions that Dunning, a year ago living in New York City, says he made his way back to his hometown Chicago. With rumors of New York going into lockdown and the uncertainty behind it, he says he and his girlfriend packed their car and drove west, thinking they’d work remotely for a week before heading back.

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Storyteller — An Interview With Norma Ibarra

Intro & Interview by José Vadi
Photography by Norma Ibarra

Photographer Norma Ibarra left her hometown of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico in 2009 and moved to Vancouver, British Columbia — a few blocks away from Antisocial Skateshop in 2015. She started skating and became obsessed. Norma transferred her lifelong photography passion into contributions to the burgeoning The Skate Witches collective-turned-zine and volunteering for nonprofits like Skate Like a Girl. Self-funded skate trips turned into official invites from brands to document the worldwide sessions. Few have captured so many unique skate scenes around the world in so little time as Norma, who has a keen eye for showcasing skateboarding as a conversation with the cities and communities that house every trick.

Norma’s energy and passion for her work was palpable during our recent phone call, where we talked about photographer etiquette, hoarding clothes, and why growing your own food can help your skating.

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