Meet Me At The Mall — The Skateable History of Allen Street

According to The Street Book: An Encyclopedia of Manhattan’s Street Names and Their Origins, Allen Street gets its name from William Henry Allen, the youngest Navy captain in the War of 1812. (Our then-recent ex, Great Britain, was beefing with Napoleon while America stayed neutral. The U.S. was trying to send a flow box to France, and Britain felt some type of way about it. Like any bitter ex who sees someone else wearing your hoody after a messy break-up, they went to war.)

Legend has it that Allen was in the English Channel on the hunt for ops, when he stumbled on a Portuguese cargo ship carrying wine. Him and the squad had a wild night with the haul, but unfortunately, got caught slipping by the British on the following day. Allen and his crew’s colossal hangover would be their last: British canons shot off his leg, and he would die on August 18, 1813.

200 years later, L.E.S Skatepark was born.

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Five Favorite Parts With Andrew Reynolds

Intro + Interview by Adam Abada

Reynolds has been around a lot of skateboarding and is responsible for putting some of the best of it into the world, be it with his own parts or anyone on his companies. Just a few months out from the release of Baker 4, we hit him up to see what has stuck out for him over the years and what might influence his own videos.

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QS Restaurant Week — An Oral History of Skateboarding’s Most Notorious Fast Food Hangouts

Words & Interviews by Frozen in Carbonite
Illustrations by Cosme Studio

The history of the [largely extinct] American Skate Plaza™ has been documented meticulously in thousands of hours of video footage, interviews and podcasts.

However, documentarians of #theculture have largely overlooked the ancillary dining establishments that fueled — on a molecular level — the innovation and unforgettable sessions at spots like the Brooklyn Banks, Pulaski, Embarcadero and Love Park.

Until the rise of “foodie” culture, Yelp and the general trend of eating healthy and shit, most skaters’ palates trended towards the most convenient fast-casual options.

With that in mind, and in conjunction with New York Restaurant Week (which is apparently almost a month long ¯\_(ツ)_/¯), we present Quartersnacks Restaurant Week — an oral history of legendary spot-adjacent fast food restaurants. Over the course of conducting the interviews, some common themes emerged, i.e. most skaters favored carb-heavy menu options as an easily accessible energy source. In addition, at most spots the skaters and food service workers formed alliances — an interesting anthropological wrinkle in terms of how different cultures interact.

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Homies Network — An Interview With Kei, Kyota, Mark & Sully

Photo by Mark Custer

A crew’s first video is always an experiment. It is an experiment in finding the tone, the pacing, and even the overall understanding from everybody that yes, you’re making a video. Everyone in The Homies Video would have started skating after Instagram came around, but it didn’t affect the idea that there is something unifying and special about creating a full-on video. We chatted with Kei (the video’s filmer + editor), Mark (the crew’s photographer), and Kyota + Sully (both of whom have full parts in it) about what it was like filming for the first Homies Network video.

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How did all of you meet each other?

Kei: I’ve known Kyota almost since birth. My parents moved here from Japan around the same time as his [moved from Japan]. We were both born here, and we lived like two blocks apart. I was best friends with his older brother, who is 20, and I’m 18.

Sully moved from Florida, and started skating with Kyota and them. It’s really just mutual friends between everyone. I’ve known Mark through his Instagram and his photography. I asked him to take some photos for the video.

What is Homies Network?

Kei: It’s me filming my friends. Everyone in the video is one of my favorite skaters. I took my parents old TRV-820 because I didn’t have any money to buy a new camera. I wanted to make something small — like, a short video, and it turned out to be way bigger than it was.

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Five Favorite Parts With Cyrus Bennett

Photo by Ben Colen

Skateboarding has unavoidable surface-level parts that trace back to their modern counterparts, and there are always some “that makes sense” thoughts when doing the Five Faves interviews. (Gino going heavy with the mini ramp skating is perhaps one of the few genuine off-guard ones.) For example, everyone thinks to mention Huf and Reese when talking about dudes who honed four or five things to absolute perfection, but there’s always room to go a bit deeper, e.g. Donger deserves to be brought up in that conversation just as fast.

We’ve pretty much posted every video Cyrus has been in since his Mama’s Boys part went online in 2013, so these all “made sense” — but will say that none of them were obvious ;)

Request line is always open!

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