Club Life Vol. 4 In Stores Now

May 26th, 2015 | 5:05 am | Daily News | No Comments

free the nipple

#freethenipple

These Magenta parodies are becoming a burgeoning sub-genre of Vine humor.

Helas is the Lordz of the 2010s #TDGAFAU

Solid New York montage from the Mood NYC crew and The Man Who Films.

ICYMI: Lurk NYC is back with Volume 10 of the “New York Times” outtakes series, and Jenkem dropped a ten-minute video featurette on the making of Polar and Converse’s “Manhattan Days” video from last year.

Ron Deily and Gavin Nolan with a cold sesh at the 181st Street park this past winter.

They’re trying to build a five-story cement skatepark in Folkestone, England.

Action Bronson’s part from Life is Goodie.

“[Alien Workshop] was dying when we were making Mindfield.” — A.V.E.

Mark Gonzales uploaded a six-minute video of Jake Johnson trying switch flip backside lipslides down Black Hubba in slow motion. Is it art? It must be art.

Standard issue New York iPhone montage with a lot of L.E.S. and Columbus Park footage, which advances the sad reality that Columbus Park may now be the most popular street spot in lower Manhattan, if not Manhattan altogether. Aubrey Graham on #musicsupervision to help you cry through it :'(

Always weird to remember that people actually sometimes maybe kinda sorta read the words that are written on this website.

Late on all of this, but…got sucked into a Google wormhole of reading about ghost cities in China — urban developments intended for millions of people that ended up containing maybe ~2% of that projection. That naturally provoked the question of “why has no one done a skate trip here?” which then lead to a discovery of this two-year-old video. It’s the most eerily post-apocalyptic skate video ever.

No phrase was said more this past weekend than “It’s the Zoo York.” Film yourself listening to the video below on loop for ten hours to win a gift box from Bronze and an Uber gift certificate from Quartersnacks. Tika tika tika tika tika

A video posted by Peter Sidlauskas (@solojazz) on

Is this rail skateable if you hold the Starbucks doors open? It’s new.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: 6′ 3 / 190 pound Steph Curry boxes out 7′ / 270 pound Dwight Howard.

Quote of the Week: “The West Village is the new East Village.” — E.J

Small drop of new summer merch available in the webstore Monday, June 1. 12 A.M.

Levi’s Skateboarding + Quartersnacks Set Contest

May 22nd, 2015 | 3:32 am | Footage | 24 Comments

set contest

As prefaced on Wednesday, set building employs a large portion of skateboarders in New York. Thanks to the support of Levi’s Skateboarding, we were able to get some funds to throw a contest between a few of the shops out in Brooklyn.

The premise is simple, shoot a video with each respective shop’s employees skating only their workspace. Each had a little over a month to complete the task, and could take any route they wanted. A few weren’t able to come through due to the time demands of the job (always next time), but we got two solid entries from two of the larger skater-run shops: Pink Sparrow and Ready Set. Check below.

The winner gets $3k for their team. We gonna let the streets decide who wins.

Who should get the $3k?

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Voting ends May 31st, 11:59 P.M. May the best team win. Have a good weekend ;)

An Ode to the Chris Cole Who Wore Yellow T-Shirts

May 21st, 2015 | 1:52 pm | Time Capsule | 21 Comments

chris cole yellow tee

I’ve been to two Street Leagues in my life. Between the mush of free alcohol and conversations with #industry #friendz who you otherwise only see at such events, memories of tricks at those contests are foggy. Except one.

Chris Cole needed some high score to avoid elimination (pretty sure that’s what was going on…), and there weren’t a lot of tricks available that would yield a score high enough, especially with one try at his disposal. The dude rolled up to a handrail frontside, did an alley-oop frontside 270 over it (he’s not rolling backside so nobody say it’s a 270 lip), and front boards down it. No test run, no warm-up. Just threw his board down and did it. Needless to say, he got whatever score he needed.

Other than that, I can’t remember a single Chris Cole part since he got on Zero. Not “hating” at all — the dude is probably one of the top five skateboarders working today if you’re using raw talent as your metric. Either Cole or Mariano are the first names that pop up to answer the question “Has anyone ever done..?” His skating just never crossed that 1% threshold of relate-ability required for repeat viewings of a part for an adult sk8r boy. It’s on another planet.

Skaters With Jobs: A Special Investigative Report

May 20th, 2015 | 11:39 am | Features & Interviews | 13 Comments

andrew_wilson_wallride_ready_set

Photo via Colin Sussingham

A job is like kryptonite to a skateboarder. A normal schedule, conceding to authority figures, responsibility — these bare minimum characteristics of employment are pretty unappealing. Many skaters’ job histories involve quitting abruptly or getting fired hungover. It’s not exactly an activity that promotes “growing up,” at least in the traditional sense.

One of the most commonly asked questions by people on the outside looking into New York skateboarding is “How do you afford to live there?” San Francisco might’ve just knocked us off for highest cost-of-living in America, but surviving here still costs a lot, especially if you’re intent on staying for more than a summer or two. A bit has been written on jobs in skateboarding; there’s less information out there on what type of jobs most skateboarders actually have. For as long as many of my friends have been above adult working age (post-“slumming it out to avoid any semblance of responsibility”-age), a sizable portion of them have worked for set companies.

This may come as a surprise, but a set company makes sets. The background of most ads or commercials you see is fake. Say a fashion company wants to do a photo shoot with a bunch of babes. Some creative director will scream at a bunch of people with MFAs to sketch out a concept for the backdrop. That concept gets given to a set-design company, who in New York, will potentially give it to a responsible skateboarder who they employ, who then, delegates work out to a team of maybe less-responsible-but-still-responsible-enough skateboarders to build out and deliver to the client.

Chances are, when you flip through some magazine and see a Victoria’s Secret or Ralph Lauren ad, the entire background was built by skateboarders you see in videos on the internet. See, it ain’t only Olson and Rieder — skaters come into fashion on all levels fam.

quarter

Photo via Dave Dowd

After years of hearing about this industry that employs at least a few people in every skate crew throughout the city (“can’t skate for three weeks, I’m on a job”), it made sense to shine a light on it. We asked Lurker Lou, a decade-plus-long set-builder / C.E.O. of Iron Claw Skates, Fred Gall, a freelance refugee in the set-building industry / Governor of New Jersey, and Paul Coots, a project manager at Ready Set who’s been able to help many skaters keep money in their pocket — about why the hell every skater works for a set-design company.

Talking ‘Bout a Whole Lot of Spinach

May 18th, 2015 | 5:50 am | Daily News | 5 Comments

olson air

Extreme. Photo via Gigliotti.

281-330-8004 x 917-692-2706.

HD video blog #11 from Johnny Wilson even though Transworld commenters hate it ;)

Forrest Edwards ain’t for contest judges, he’s for the people.

Shocked to see that the new Staten Island skatepark has straight, normal ledges. NY Skateboarding takes a look at Faber Park. Looks like Astoria but with more hubbas.

Didn’t know bearing companies really go on “tour” — Bones Swiss has a new Euro tour vid out with a bunch of really good B. Worrest footage. Sorta miss the era when you could still put a really long manual in a video :(

This has been online for eight years, but saw it reposted a bit on Tumblr: raw footage of Anthony Correa from 1997. Mostly Houston and S.F. stuff. Wish there was more footage of the dude out there (or at least a version of his Mixtape 2 part that didn’t feature a rapper who actually said “my crew packed full of nuts like an Almond Joy.”) Also, that back smith on the Seaport bench in the first Static video is still reigning atop the smith grind hall of fame nearly twenty years later.

Not sure which “Summer Trip to New York” cycle this should even count for…it came out in 2015 but was seemingly filmed in 2014. Anyway, some Australians who really love helicopter shots skate around New York for a bit. The kickflip up / turn around / switch flip down line at Columbus Park is awesome.

Russians produce bleaker skate footage than even the Brits. They love tracksuits too.

Always surprised to remember that Riverside Skatepark still exists.

Happy to hear the lease at House of Vans was renewed. Place was a real lifesaver these past few winters when you just want to listen to Drake and skate with the boys.

There are the Boil the Ocean posts that I sorta get, and then there are the ones that I sorta don’t. The new one is in the latter category.

The low barrier in front of Punjabi on Avenue A and Houston is gone.

R.I.P. Chinx Drugs. “Let him be remembered for being one of the few rappers who didn’t waste Harry Fraud’s production.”

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Iguodala probably should’ve been called for the foul here, but Steph hit a shot behind two three point-lines. Big no thanks to the Los Angeles Clippers for allowing this excruciating-to-watch Houston team to make it to the conference finals. You guys are horrible and hate people who watch basketball.

Quote of the Week: “Vaping is the rollerblading of smoking.” — Billy Rohan

Ok, who do we talk to about the New York version?