The Greatest Guest Tricks in Skate Video History

July 25th, 2014 | 5:05 am | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

cameos

(Plus their guest verse in a rap song counterparts.)

As America’s premier inventions, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that both rap and skateboarding have similarities. For example, guest verses on rap songs and guest tricks in parts virtually operate in the same exact way: they start careers, they rejuvenate careers, give way to friendly competition on the same spot/beat, and sometimes, they simply provide material for the nerds to nerd out over.

…and yes, this is maybe the nerdiest thing ever posted on this website.

Putting your team on is basically the most hip-hop shit you could do in any realm of life, even if it often results in bankruptcy. We dug through the rich dual histories of putting other dudes on your song, and other dudes in your video part, seeking comparisons whenever they were applicable. This is rather Transworld video heavy because they embraced the power of the cameo far more than other institutions. Think of them as the Hypnotize Camp or Wu-Tang of skate videos…or something.

The Annual PWBC News Segment

July 21st, 2014 | 1:00 pm | Daily News | 17 Comments

Long gone are the days of bi-weekly skateboarding discourse from the PWBC news network. Having shifted focus towards merchandise and the #streets, PWBC anchors are now only summoned to report on the most crucial issues of our time.

In 2014′s installment, they cover:

1) A potential steroid-abusing version of Enrique Lorenzo.
2) Stereo and their responsibility for the proliferation of penny boards.
3) Whether or not using a “bungie cord” as a roll-up is legitimate.
4) Palace being distributed in the United States by Baker Boys.
5) Jamal Smith — star of skateboarding’s legitimate first ever #viral video — coming out of retirement to teach you fakie dreidel spins.
6) Reider’s HUF commercial…obviously.
7) Joey Pepper being chill and Jahmal Williams BGPs.

But most importantly, if you have a United States-based skateboard sales operation or are affiliated with one in any way, it’s going to be significantly easier for you to carry Palace boards now…which might also mean they will be on the road to hiring and staffing an entire PWBC 24-hour news network by 2017.

Seagulls & Arabian Burnouts

July 21st, 2014 | 9:06 am | Daily News | 3 Comments

dollar slice

Thanks to inflation and skyrocketing cheese costs, hundreds of sixteen-year-olds are approaching death from starvation at the L.E.S. Park as you read this. R.I.P. New York Skateboarding 1993 — 2014. It was a fun 21 years :( Photo via @stillweii on Instagram.

Week late, yeah, and yes, “real hip-hop” music supervision is making the entire QS office want to only listen to Migos until the end of human history, but the new GX1000 clip is a New York montage of the year contender. It has everything: Jake, Aaron Herrington, lines in building lobbies, tricks on two-second bust spots, Brendan Carroll finding two new ways to skate Union Square, and near-death experiences.

FYI if you need to watch Jake’s Montreal wallride on loop

“Nobody naturally skates like Dylan Rieder, not even Dylan Rieder.” With skateboarding’s renewed emphasis on post-land poses, Muckmouth put together a compilation of “Storks” A.K.A. one-foot rollaways. Yes, Gino is obviously the king. (They’re not completely extint…Ishod slips out of a chill switch one in this clip.)

New Anthony Correa footage at the ~20:30 mark of this Houston video.

Man, this incarnation of Girl and Chocolate was incredible — just thank the heavens that the jump-cut era of skate video editing got phased out by 2004. Have you tried watching The Reason lately? It’s seizure-inducing.

Lamenting the demise of slam sections in skate videos. Didn’t they just get renamed to “fail comps” and move to YouTube? …and what person 25+ needs more reasons to get discouraged from skateboarding? Parkour slams are way better anyway.

An indoor park clip that’s actually fun to watch! Last line is intense.

A teaser for Bleach, a new video by Paul Young, who made Nevermind. Features many Bronze 2.5 affiliates.

Skateboarders riding first class to the literary establishment’s innermost sanctums, plus some reviews of books pertinent to the act of riding a skateboard. “cherry” is apparently a work of literature? And David Foster Wallace is a narc.

Omg German engineering.

Steven Cales calls into the last episode of Skate Wise.

Quote of the Week: “Is bae a thot?” — Dave Dowd

New PWBC news clip in a few hours ;)

Finally Famous: Three Up Three Down

July 18th, 2014 | 5:54 am | Daily News | 3 Comments

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There’s a difference between pioneering something and popularizing it. You could be the first one to do it, but not necessarily the one that gets everyone else to do it.

Skateboarders are rolling out to Berlin in desaturated droves — just *hoping* that their fashion senses get rejuvenated by the second week of September. (Who knows, maybe some sick nips step into the frame on a lifestyle shot if they’re lucky?) Except German excursions aren’t the first act of destination popularization that Dylan Reider is responsible for in 2014. His “cherry” part got good skateboarders to begin skating Three Up Three Down, a longtime favorite spot of the Quartersnacks office.

Nevermind that his line which legitimized Three Up in professional skateboarding’s collective consciousness began with an Andre Page ABD from 2011, or that Dre was the first person to ever prop up the grate to the bike rack, or even that Roctakon filmed a line there while wearing, like, $500 Dior jeans. It’s pioneerization (no, that’s not a word) v.s. popularization all over again. Dylan Reider is capable of influencing skateboarding’s zeitgeist in a way that we are not.

HOWEVER, as longtime fans of Three Up Three Down (and the women that jog past it ♥♥♥♥♥), we ARE qualified to speak on HOW it is skated. Three Up Three Down in not about fashion runway renditions of kickflip nose manuals, or being quick enough to stuff a trick between the two sets. It is the premier “If you can’t ollie up it, don’t ollie down it”-spot. It is not about showing off.

We give people from Florida a hard time*, but credit must be given when it is due. Jimmy Lannon now officially holds the title for the best line done at Three Up Three Down by a professional skateboarder. Switch manual. Switch varial flip on flat. End.

Perfect.

(Labor has Static IV DVDs by the way.)

Can’t imagine there will be many developments here on a professional front until someone waxes up the top step (i.e. Danny Gonzalez with the spot’s San Francisco counterpart.) That could take a while.

*It’s been a tough week to maintain Florida-related biases, especially after also being forced to admit that a Floridian had the best footage in Enron. Shouldn’t take long for Florida to fall back down again though: look no further.

An Interview With Lurker Lou About Card Boards

July 16th, 2014 | 7:30 am | Features & Interviews | 4 Comments

Lurker Lou FSNS Barrier

Photo by Trevor Macculley

If you are ready to forgive Lurker Lou for ruining skateboarding, he’s been working on a pretty cool project entitled Card Boards. Rather than allowing childhood baseball cards to collect dust and tossing old boards by the curb, Lou combined the two into a collection for the entire Major League. He has a show this Saturday featuring all the boards, so we spoke to him about how Card Boards came to fruition.

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Everyone has a story about how they first got into collecting things as a kid. How did you get into baseball cards?

My dad was into baseball throughout his life. He was born in 1947 and collected during the forties and fifties. When he went to college, his mom threw out his collection.

Baseball card collecting got hot again in the eighties. I had a brother who was five years older than me, and when he was eight or nine, my dad started buying him all these cards. By the time I started at six or seven, he was already over them. I got all my brother’s cards and went from there. The eighties were sort of the peak of collecting cards.

Why was it the peak?

All the baby boomers, like my dad, were in their forties. They didn’t want you to just throw them away like they did. That’s why they became rare, because no one thought to hold onto them when they first got big in the forties and fifties.

My dad had a liquor store and he would carry baseball cards there. He’d buy boxes for me at wholesale, like as a treat when I got As on my report card. We’d take the good ones, put them aside and make team sets. At 11 years old, I started skating, and completely left anything having to do with baseball or cards behind. Card collecting was on its way out anyway. The market got over saturated.

lou-boards-4

How’d you decide to start making boards with cards twenty years down the line?

I was bored, going through old stuff in maybe winter 2012. An old roommate had left a bunch of cards behind. He had Shawn Kemp rookie cards, Gretzkys and other shit. I wanted to get rid of the cards to make back some of the money this dude owed me. I went onto Beckett.com, which was the website of this monthly magazine that would tell you card prices back in the day. The cards are worth nothing. A mint condition 1987 Gretzky is maybe $8-16. I wasn’t going to go through the trouble of selling some cards for $10.