First Take — The New P.J. Ladd Video Part

August 17th, 2017 | 12:44 pm | Daily News | No Comments

Words by Frozen in Carbonite

Reclusive geniuses are an endangered species these days. In the current era of personal branding and ever-flowing #content, this state of affairs renders new material from one an #event — like that one new Harper Lee book or, as I referenced here, a hypothetical new Salinger novel.

After the Plan B video came and went with a single solitary trick, the long-awaited P.J. Ladd street (i.e. not filmed in a private indoor T.F.) video part occupied a mental space somewhere between Chinese Democracy and the Menace video.

Indeed, if I were in a barstool conversation with, say, Chuck Klosterman, the easiest way to convey what makes P.J. Ladd such an icon would be to say “He’s like the Brian Wilson of skateboarding” — an archetype-shattering, somewhat eccentric genius. However, once you shatter the mirror once — via a Pet Sounds or a PJLWHL — you can’t put it back together. That impact is one-time-only. What made PJLWHL so insane was that it was technically mindblowing and viscerally relatable (ledges alongside piles of snow, shredded Accels) at once. It was as if the exponential progression of Embarcadero — achieved collectively by Sanchez, Carroll, et. al. — had been recreated in one mind. Also, just like Brian Wilson inspired a legion of followers (like the dude from Spiritualized, etc.), Ladd created an entire genre of Boston ledge-tech assassins.

So, after a decade and a half, the most realistic expectation — as with Wilson’s 1980’s solo record — is quality work.

Which brings us to the outline of the part itself. Tricks, spots, and fits.

Five Favorite Parts With The Chrome Ball Incident

August 16th, 2017 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 3 Comments

The latest faves come from one of the eminent scholars of our craft. As he has mainly trafficked in still images, we asked him for five picks from the history of skate videos. (We’ll get a pro on the next one, but the non-pro streak has been pretty fun.)

Chops even offered a quick intro, so the rest of the words are his :)

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Big ups to bro-cam, uncleared music, lens rings, slam sections, “acting”, background yelling (preferably in slow motion), self-celebratory rollaways, camera lights, hard copies, dubbed copies, BGPs, pissed-off security guards, random lurkers, supersonic skatecamps and unnecessarily long manual clips.

This list is dedicated to Gonz’s Video Days, Natas’ Fires, Guy’s Mouse, MC’s Questionable, Ricky’s EE3, Henry’s Lies and Heath’s Unseen Sight. Some things, like orgasms and pizza, are past the need of further recommendation.

Sundays Are Too Fun ©

August 14th, 2017 | 2:53 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

Via @rumoursandlies on Instagram

We made some fast Snackman tees with our friends at Dime. Available now at their store in Montreal, and available tomorrow at 8 P.M. E.S.T. on their webstore.

Also on that note, Monster Children has a quick preview of this year’s upcoming Glory Challenge. “Pretty stoked to use pyrotechnics this year.”

Eric Koston filmed everyone’s favorite Russian skateboarder and back smither do a line at my favorite skate spot on planet earth. It ends with a back smith.

Here is a thirteen-minute-long mega mix of any and all 917 affiliates’ footage (Cyrus, Max, Genny, Nyjah, etc.) that has been pulled off various Instagram depositories. Only just over a month until we figure out whether or not Logan is lying to us!

A new trailer for Sabotage 5, which will be, as strange as it sounds to say, the final Love Park video. Due out on DVD and VHS on September 29.

Vogue Skateboard Magazine has a rare, detailed profile on Supreme.

Skateboarders have been responsible for some horrendous, phoned-in art in their day, especially as they’ve lapsed away from actual skating — BUT we can all agree the most #subversive, #disruptive, and #iconic skate art can be found in the contentious world of skatepark graffiti. TBH, we should start doing Tompkins graffiti updates.

Nine minutes of raw footage from steezy underweight guy and ABC ledge survivalist, Nick Ferro, as derived from Grand Collection’s “Buggy” video.

Are people still allowed to ollie into ledge tricks on Instagram?

And with this video, @nextlevelkook A.K.A. Tyler Warren has taken the throne as IG’s finest auteur. Dutchmaster Delaney and Kevin Tierney are still up there though.

That short-lived manual pad at the Escape From New York cathedral on Amsterdam is no more. They put a rail around the corner, but that hasn’t stopped people from filming enders there.

Airdropping dick pics to people on the subway is pretty foul, but yo, now you can AirDrop your footy tape all over Agenda, Tampa AM, etc. to get on.

Quote of the Week: “Did I ever tell you about the time I was seven hours early to work but still three hours late?” — Keith Denley

Quartersnacks Top 10 — August 11, 2017

August 11th, 2017 | 2:37 pm | Daily News | 1 Comment

Lucas is on Palace, we have some tees we did with the Dime boys dropping at their store tomorrow (and on their webstore Monday night at 8 P.M.), and the QS Top 10 is late. Definitely an Instagram-heavy past week. Have a good one.

Original Clips:

Spoiler

Intro via IG [link] 10) Max Garson via “Alien Workshop x Emage” part [link] 9) J.B. Gillet via IG [link] 8) Tyshawn Jones via IG [link] 7) Gustav Tonnesen via IG [link] 6) Tyler Pacheco via “Extra Flare” [link] 5) Alexey Maleshko via “Berlin with Alexey Maleshko” [link] 4) Pedro Biagio via IG [link] 3) Jorge Calderon via IG [link] 2) Magnus Bordewick via IG [link] 1) Bobby DeKeyzer via Riddles in Mathematics [link]

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Previously: August 4, 2017

An Interview With John Gardner

August 10th, 2017 | 2:51 pm | Features & Interviews | No Comments

Photo by Andy Enos

Intro & Interview by Zach Baker

A dope thing about skateboarding is that it attracts an endless variety of people, who are each drawn to it for their own specific reasons. We all have our unique relationships within skateboarding as far as what we want to do, who we want to be around, and where we want to go on, with, or because of them.

John Gardner’s motivations on a skateboard are not so easily pigeon-holed, though it can be said that he’s not adhering to any sort of trends in attire, trick selection, or really, well anything. It makes one wonder whether he even needs a skateboard. Like, if the skateboard were never invented, I feel like John Gardner would figure out some other vehicle to sate his physical and creative urges. This points to part of what makes him such a delight to watch. For some people, skateboarding is what creates their identity. But for John, the skateboard is just an accessory, one of many mediums lending themselves to his way of life and creative pursuits. Without the board, he’d be no less extraordinary, but as skateboarders, we couldn’t be more fortunate to have him as a member of the club.

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To start…the video part. It was just a pleasure to watch. Give me a little overview.

I had a bunch of VX footage that was just kind of sitting around, and I had always wanted to make music for a video part but never really had an opportunity to do so, so I immediately connected the dots and thought that this would be a great opportunity to make that happen. It’s over the course of two-and-a-half years, whenever a VX came out. Some of those clips might even be three of four years old. A lot of it is in California with some Jersey sprinkled in between.

Tell me about the soundtrack.

My friend Max Hersteiner, who I used to live with, is in an amazing band called Dirty Fences — he’s in a couple bands actually, Dirty Fences and Metal Leg. He and the bassist of Dirty Fences and Metal Leg, Max Komaski, all created music together for various video projects that I’ve made, so I hit those dudes up immediately to just jam and see what we came up with. Max’s friend Danny Cooper played guitar for the soundtrack. We just set up a camera, experimented and that’s what we came up with.

What’s up with your uncle?

My uncle is a wild man. He is my uncle Semo, my dad’s brother. He has a lot of upper body strength and is really good at doing handstands. He would walk up and down stairs on his hands when he was younger, so he naturally gravitated to riding a skateboard on his hands. I had a camera and wanted him to be in this little video that I was making, so we drove around looking for a little hill and filmed him doing his thing and that’s what I got. He loves skateboarding and he really tries but he skates better on his hands than I would say he skates on his feet.