The QS Transition Facilities Tour — Part 3

November 27th, 2015 | 3:04 am | Features & Interviews | 2 Comments

adrian hall

Photo by Zach Baker

[Part one here, part two here]

When celebrating the virtues of skate-friendly cities like Copenhagen, it’s important to remember that they didn’t become that way by accident. A place like Denmark may not have the vehement sue-happy culture we do, but there’s still a long process to build a utopia. People with college degrees and sophisticated understandings of architecture, city planning, etc. — who also happen to skateboard — fought for that shit. Many cities are slowly starting to recognize skateboarding as something more productive than spraypainting on a wall or pissing in a corner. Now the next step is figuring the subtleties out. “Maybe a blind-built pre-fab park isn’t the best idea…”

When presented with a chance to do something permanent with the locals in Providence, it didn’t make sense for it to be an exclusive keyholder type of project. It also didn’t make sense to add on to an existing skatepark; they have a whole community already doing a good job at keeping that flame lit.

Filmed by Dan Mcgrath and Johnny Wilson. Alternate YouTube Link.

Adrian Hall Park, across the street from the Trinity Repertory Theater in downtown Providence, has been a stop for skaters since the early nineties. It has a platform to do tricks off, some steps, and a curb — not a great spot, but enough to keep interest when you get the boot out of everywhere else downtown and are willing to settle on skating anything, insofar as you don’t get hassled. Beyond the skaters, there usually isn’t a whole lot going on in the park. It’s not scenic, as it’s on a side street next to a parking garage: a perfect place to drink a brown-bagged beer or take a nap on some cardboard if you don’t have anywhere to be that night. It was also a solid candidate to be turned into something more than just a barren stone park.

The QS Transition Facilities Tour — Part 2

November 25th, 2015 | 11:31 am | Features & Interviews | No Comments

spine wave

Photo by Pad Dowd

One of the byproducts of New England’s tightly-knit park scene is that it created a generation of locals who are resourceful and good with their hands. There’s not always a park being built, but if you look hard enough, there’s always an opportunity for a one-off in a forgotten crevice of the city. These will range from the equivalent of what we know in New York as works of “Jerry Duty,” to micro spots that stuff one-tenth of a skatepark into a cleared out corner behind an industrial zone.

A lot of these spots aren’t under some main bridge, or in a well-traversed warehouse district, e.g. how the B.Q.E. spot is a fully public D.I.Y. creation. Maybe a guy knows a guy who knows a guy, and he’ll give skaters free reign over a hidden patch of land to the side of his building before he figures out just what the hell he’s going to do with it. The results become a bowl corner next to a factory’s crumbling smokestack, or a wavy spine concoction built over an out-of-commission gas pipe that even National Grid doesn’t know the deal with. Barring a few anomalies, the northeast isn’t equipped for long lasting full-fledged D.I.Y. skateparks like more spacious parts of the country are. People have been living on top of each other for hundreds of years here; spots like these are left to make do with the leftover crumbs of the city.

Filmed by Johnny Wilson & Max Palmer. Alternate YouTube Link.

The most insane example involved a thirty-minute drive from downtown Providence, until you pull up to a dilapidated building in a neighborhood that has nothing but liquor stores. If you’ve seen that movie Prisoners, it’s basically like that building where Hugh Jackman takes the guy to torture him.

The Flushing Grate, Abridged

November 25th, 2015 | 4:40 am | Daily News | 15 Comments


Krak has been prolific in bringing us video Cliffnotes of every name-brand spot as of late. The latest installment comes from the second most famous ledge over a grate gap on planet earth (the first one being in Italy obvs, as it’s maybe the most famous non-Philadelphian or Barcelonian ledge spot altogether), and the longest still-standing marquee obstacle in New York city limits.

Though it’s not arranged chronologically, it really goes to show you how psychotic the progression of skating has been in the fifteen years since a long switch back tail was an extra sslloowweedd banger in a video part. Gino was just talking about how kids being able to hop on a ledge and sit on it is a symptom of “I can’t remember a single trick from that part”-syndrome. At least the the reigning king of sitting on the grate probably has a 516 area code, and did all of his more noteworthy maneuvers before superhuman abilities to sit on ledges became more common. Everything post-Reres has been more or less a blur via obligatory clips in “Summer Trip to New York” edits.

A few footnotes…

– The first footage of this thing in mind is Rodney’s crook and S.J’s front tail in Peep This. (Or was it Heads?) Bici had the first footage of Flushing altogether that I can recall in Mixtape, though he skated the outside of the ledge. He’s also the last person to ever film a slide on the outside of spot as well ;)

– The only notable omissions that come to mind are 1) Moya’s switch front nose, which I swear was in a Metrospective clip but nobody remembers it, nor is it easily traceable. 2) Joey Pepper’s kickflip back lip and lipslide to noseblunt pop up thing. 3) Someone back smithed it right? McFeely in Solo Jazz. 4) Jack Sabback’s frontside nosegrind revert in the middle of the ledge. 5) I’m sure there are more, but these sort of things are next to impossible to be 100% comprehensive on.

The QS Transition Facilities Tour — Part 1

November 24th, 2015 | 9:46 am | Features & Interviews | 4 Comments


Photo by Zach Baker

It is no secret that we spend an inordinate amount of time in caged in, flat spaces. And it is no secret — as much as we may try to glamorize it — that it gets old after a while. With open road season in the northeast coming to a close, we hit I-95 one last time this fall. Except rather than going to surefire crutches like Eggs or Pulaski, we aimed for something a little different, and a little less…flat. We loaded up the three or five people in the crew adequately versed in skating transition for an atypical QS journey. We went to concrete skateparks, and ended up leaving something permanent behind us in the end (more on that later.)

The concrete skatepark is a relatively new phenomenon in New York. Sure, Owl’s Head has been there for a decade-and-a-half, but the recent surge in parks popping up everywhere is only ~five years old. It also came after we spent much of the 2000s languishing in pre-fab purgatory. Even then, if you heard some of the stories from people tasked with negotiating the skaters’ side in building a park, you’d want to strangle yourself with the red tape. We have one of the three largest city economies in the world; the level of bureaucracy that comes with each one we’re fortunate enough to have is unparalleled. Hopefully, the stadium-lit volleyball courts out on Tribeca piers have an easier time getting built…

Filmed by Johnny Wilson & Max Palmer. Alternate YouTube link.

New England embraced outdoor and public concrete parks long before we did. That’s mostly due to two people: Sloppy Sam, who founded Breaking Ground Skateparks, and Jeff Paprocki, who now owns Paprocki Concrete & Masonry. Both of them navigated the laws and public works departments that vary between every New England town to create much of the vast network of parks that exists up there today. Once you stop by Frank Pepe’s in New Haven and make it into the eastern half of Connecticut, it’s possible to spend the day hitting three or four unique parks, all thanks to these dudes. They aren’t “D.I.Y.” creations in the grey understanding that we have of that phrase, but it’s obvious they wouldn’t exist without the saintly proactive efforts of a few individuals. “It’s all about knowing the right person to talk to.” And also having the right crew around you.

My Board in the Bushes

November 23rd, 2015 | 5:00 am | Daily News | 4 Comments


Photo via the Shady Homie. Pre-order TF at 1: Ten Years of Quartersnacks here.

Really confused with what’s going on over at the Girl camp… Guy and Koston leave after 20+ years, and in the same week, we find out that Forrest Edwards got dropped from Zero — yet there hasn’t been a single sighting of Forrest’s face with the word “welcome” under it on the Crailtap Instagram. Anyone know what gives?

Gonna have to agree with Kalis on this one. This guy is insane. 2015 Q.S.S.O.T.Y. frontrunner. No clue why he didn’t skate to “Stick Talk” though.

“I honestly get wet. I could listen to him ramble on about skateboarding for hours.” Apparently chicks dig us because we don’t care about them — or just care about skating with the squad way more than chasing girls and that’s hot? (And maybe because we steal from them?) However, pretty sure no skateboarder or human has ever turned down sex in order to listen to The Weeknd unfettered. 56 Nights? Maybe.

Those pipes on the eastern side of Trendy Triangle were appropriately #trending heavy this past weekend. Pretty sure they won’t be there tomorrow. Pipe it up while you can.

Five-minute montage from some bros in the Bronx.

Village Psychic has a rad new “Trip to New York”-ish video / Grady Moquin and Shane Brown part, with a cool vibez and sick spotz + a fire Quim Cardona cameo :)

Reynolds shuvin’ in ‘n out of noseslides.

Thanks for the book review. We tried and shit.

Friends Section” is the new seven-minute video featuring the KCDC squad. That *almost* at House of Vans @ the ~3:48 mark is absolutely nuts.

Interviewing people in bars is *IN* this fall: part two of Gino’s “Free Lunch” where he breaks down the common phenomenon of watching someone’s part and not being able to remember a single trick, and Zered has a quick one for What Youth.

Every (most?) tricks done down Hubba Hideout in six and a half minutes.

All of these people / tricks are absurd.

A day in beautiful Paterson, New Jersey with German Nieves. It ain’t about Fetty Wap.

New midtown marble.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week:You used to boo me on draft nighttt

Quote of the Week

Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 12.05.03 AM

Plies been getting a lot of burn for that ig’ “Ritz Carlton” video this past week, but just remember that only a few months ago, he came the closest anyone has come to peak-Young Jeezy levels of motivational speaking since…peak era Young Jeezy.