Off Brand: A Quartersnacks D.I.Y. Build

October 31st, 2014 | 3:20 am | Footage | 6 Comments

ultra

Ultra Premium Concrete Mix

There is nothing as not-on-brand for QS as a D.I.Y build. Pouring concrete is #manly, but it is not #fashionable. Those guys are core to the bone and have nothing but heart; we’re a bunch of bums trying to drink ice coffee and maybe skate flat. When Levi’s Skateboarding approached us with the opportunity to sponsor a D.I.Y. build, we were completely lost. What do we do, and how do we stay #onbrand?

Thanks to some connections through mutual friends, we linked with the crew at Shorty’s. The solution was to turn the build into one big party. Shorty’s is now perhaps the only spot in the world where ramps are built not only with blood, sweat and tears, but also with champagne. Cabana rap, Ultra Premium Vodka, and buxomly proportions naturally followed suit.

Alternate YouTube Link

If anything, this experience heightened already-high levels of respect for dudes who go the distance of building places like Shorty’s. Having never been around for the construction of anything more than a ledge, as an outsider, its easy to neglect all the small steps behind these sort of spaces (e.g. the fact that they have to cut into the ground with an electric saw, and chip the floor out to make the transitions flush with the ground.) Also, a truck full of eighty-pound concrete bags goes way less of a ways than we ever imagined. It’s barely enough for half of a mid-sized quarterpipe. No wonder Home Depot loves these guys so much.

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Pad Dowd. Photo by Collin Sussingham.

Filed Under: Footage | Tags: ,

#TBT: That ‘You Wanna Date A Skater? Really. Really?’ Article From 2009

October 30th, 2014 | 5:21 am | Time Capsule | 21 Comments

chix

CENSORED Photo by John Roman

While going through some photos of 2008-2009ish debauchery with a friend, we reminisced about this unintentionally brilliant article, which lit up da scene and internet alike in 2009, long before going #viral held the weight it does today.

“You Wanna Date A Skater? Really. Really?” ran on the Miss Behave website in 2009. Miss Behave was like Mass Appeal, but for girls, so it should not surprise you that they went under, and their website no longer exists. Thanks to some careful archival work, we have unearthed this analysis of female frustration with the “skater” archetype, still found in any bar that serves Miller High Life across America.

This is an artifact indebted to its time. The majority of the research was clearly conducted via Lit Wednesdays circa 2008. Should there be an update of this masterpiece, it would inevitably be Brooklyn-based, as 95% of skateboarders unwilling to live inside a Chinatown shoebox have been priced out of Manhattan. This was before Dylan Reider became an international sex symbol, way before people could meticulously curate their #personalbrands via Tumblr and Instagram, and before #trending skater guyz had media outlets like Alex Olson’s talk show to publicly discuss an existence between the scene and the board. Needless to say, the ladies responsible for this article retired from the party (“I, like, don’t even go out anymore.”)

Ideally, there should be an annotated version of this piece that unpacks all of the allusions, but maybe we are better off leaving 2009 in 2009 :(

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When man got tired of walking and created the wheel, I don’t think he was aware of what he was doing. Sure, motorcycles make you look cool, fixed gears give you street cred, and lazy fucks like me appreciate a car. But no one could have predicted the apocalypse that was created when some asshole put a piece of plywood on top of four of those Flinstonian contraptions. All of a sudden, every greasy-haired, pizza-faced outcast was getting attention from the hottest girl in school. With a skateboard in hand, you better believe you were gonna be in the closet for Seven Minutes of Heaven. Forty years later, or however long it’s been (like I would fucking know) skaters are still dominating the dating world. I’m trying to figure out what it is that’s making me and every girl I know swoon over the dirt bag who cant even hold your hand because its occupied by his precious board. Lets start with the facts:

Filed Under: Time Capsule | Tags:

Who Do You Skate With in the City When I’m Not There?

October 27th, 2014 | 4:55 am | Daily News | 16 Comments

ashy

Season starts this week :) Daylight-saving time ends next week :(

1) You can buy copies of Johnny Wilson’s new video, Paych, for $10 here. Labor is supposed to be getting copies this week. The DVD also includes Beef Patty. 2) Living up to the “Most Productive Crew” trademark, those dudes already have another video on the way. 3) It’s mad sad that the VX is dead yo.

Amazing: Drunk dude calls cops on skateboarders, ends up getting arrested himself.

The bro Lil’ Lui has a video check out on the TWS site. Features footage of the 29th Street ollie from last week’s Monday headliner image.

Can’t remember the last time a part ended with a switch front shuv. What a great trick.

Not only are clubs likely seeing higher revenues on Tuesdays, skate videos are also getting made to commemorate 2014’s most on-trend day of the week.

SMLTalk listi-cized their five favorite friends sections. A notable snub / personal favorite is the one at the end of Mixtape, which pretty much nails the vibe you want any friends montage to have, not to mention features maybe the second best 360 flip ever done. Also, the Blind section from Virtual Reality belongs there off G.P. Mariano’s trick is incredible no matter what decade you’re talking about.

New Juicy Elbows clip up on YouTube. The ender is wild.

The 181st Street Park got a fresh paint job for its first birthday:

Rick Howard is on magazine covers again.

Gino + Dill + Kool G Rap + Manolo remix to commemorate new partnerships.

Backing the #musicsupervision in the new Matt Miller part.

Skating for Polar seems like it requires more heavy lifting than any other sponsorship.

Hjalte v.s. Aaron Herrington v.s. Joseph Delgado v.s. Brian Clarke in S-K-8.

Happy Halloween from Quan and Thug.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Bogut figured out how to throw mini Kevin Love passes now?

Quote of the Week:

phil

Rest in Peace Matt Reason. One of the main reasons people use the phrase “east coast” as an adjective to describe skateboarding.

Astor Place R.I.P.

October 24th, 2014 | 11:32 am | Spot Updates, Time Capsule | 4 Comments

astor rip

Though far from a prominent spot this past decade-and-a-half, it is still worth noting that after five years of hearsay, the city finally closed off Astor Place and is turning it into “one of those” shitty parks e.g. what’s in front of the Flatiron Building.

Astor Place was the original New York non-spot. The city has a long history of turning absolutely nothing into a full skate spot, and it could be said to have started here. There were some trash cans and a metal curb here, just like there are trash cans and metal curbs on every other block in New York. Yet everyone risked tickets from cops and sideswipes from cabs to skate Astor because it had a zen-like quality. There was good flat, pretty girls walking by, no shortage of weirdos*, and a vibrance that you don’t catch from skating in a space enclosed from the actual street. People have to opt into Tompkins; Astor was in the middle of everything by default.

*(Re: Weirdos — For example, there was one night when a bunch of Starbucks employees got into a beef with a bunch of K Mart employees, so while his friend was in mid-arguement, one of the K-Mart employees runs around the block, down 8th Street, left on Broadway, and up Astor Place, to sucker punch the Starbucks employee. That same night, some goth kid climbed on top of the cube, fell off, and an ambulance showed up to cart him away.)

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Photo by Mike Gigliotti

Filming at Astor in 1997 does not seem much different than filming at Tompkins in 2014. Those dudes had to be resourceful with rubbish found on the street here, and it didn’t hurt that they looked really cool simply doing 180s. After all, Hamilton Harris did one of the chillest lines in skateboarding history here. We compiled all the Astor clips from R.B. Umali’s two NY Revisted videos and threw them together on a timeline. Also, there’s a quick QS bonus reel at the end, but our time came after the glass condo, etc. went up, so that’s not worth romanticizing as much. The spot was on its way out by then and everyone just skated the front of Union instead :(

FYI: Paych DVDs available here.

Weekend at Shorty’s

October 23rd, 2014 | 5:50 am | Features & Interviews | 15 Comments

shortys1

Space in New York is a precious commodity. Lots rarely sit vacant, building foundations are never left undone, and an open area seldom exists without a security booth watching over its perimeter. The Volcano was an isolated incident. D.I.Y. in New York peaks at the B.Q.E. lot, where a few pillars form quarterpipes and banks, which then get backed into by trucks every few months and ruined. A wide open space is too precious for developers to neglect, and neglect is how every great D.I.Y. story begins.

Shorty’s is the most recognizable D.I.Y. spot the the greater New York metropolitan area today (first brought to the world’s attention by Fred Gall’s “Scum League” series), and it sits in an abandoned warehouse amid an industrial zone outside the city. The nearest train station is a thirty-minute skate away. Skateboarders need to go quite far to be left alone these days.

The spot was started by a bunch of locals living not-too-far-away, in the most ramshackle skate house imaginable. After eyeing the space, the original plan was to cement a few barriers and see how much they could get away with in incremental doses. The volatility with these sort of spaces is high: there’s never such thing as a truly “abandoned” space. All it takes is for one person with oversight to get pissed off about it. Luckily, that *knock-on-wood* hasn’t happened. Shorty’s began with a small volcano in February 2011, and has bloomed into three walls of obstacles.