Ain’t Drunk Yet: Summer 2014 Extras

September 19th, 2014 | 9:34 am | Footage | 3 Comments

dre kev

## No Flex Zone ##

These are becoming really fun to make. Everything that didn’t fit into 2014’s “End of Summer” video and other pertinent content ended up here. Sometimes, it’s hard to edit Matt Perez’s brilliance into a clip with background music and actual cuts. It’s better left alone. And yes, this is 70% a Matt Perez highlight reel. There is also nightime T.F. extras, Euro B-sides (Rich Homie Juan with a marathon line), #seaportgirlz, the extended version of Chris Haslam’s girlfriend, and much more.

Watch it with this playing in the background. “What’s good mami?”

ALSO, if you have yet to figure it out from the barrage of Instagram posts, ♥♥ the god Marisa Tomei ♥♥ brought her Alltimers cruiser on the Conan O’Brien show. Aside from her turning 50 in two months and still being hotter than any 20-something-year-old you can find, her appearance makes two rookie mistakes. 1) Supreme did not make the board. They sold the board, but Alltimers made the board. (Yes, they are sold out from Supreme. You’re an idiot for waiting for late night TV to remind you to buy a Marisa Tomei cruiser.) And 2) Whoever set that board up…wow. How does that make any logical sense at all? Whatever, that’s Conan’s intern’s fault, and not ♥♥ the god Marisa Tomei’s ♥♥. She is without fault i.e. perfect.

Have a good weekend. Save your pennies because the webstore opens up on Monday with fall gear :) $$$

Previously: Drop Offs – Volume 1

An Interview With Johnny Wilson

September 18th, 2014 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 17 Comments

cyrus-johnny-kickflip

Photo by Colin Sussingham

You can probably recognize Johnny Wilson’s crew when you see a mob rolling twenty-five deep to a Manhattan skate spot. In a city full of cop-outs (“We got kicked out because there were too many people,” “There are no good spots anymore,” “It’s too easy to get caught up partying,” etc.), they have managed to complete four full-length videos in two years, all while releasing a weekly video blog series, which is up to volume #214 right now. That’s roughly ten or maybe thirty hours of footage, in a place that we often insist to be pretty frustrating to skate in. These guys might truly be the most productive skate crew in the history of New York skateboarding.

A week from the premiere of his new video, Paych, we talked to Johnny about where they come from and how their operation functions. Sorry for not including the obligatory “VX V.S. HD!” and “Is the internet ruining skate videos?!”-questions ;) ♥

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Where are you from?

Born in South Florida, moved to New Jersey because my dad worked in the city, back to south Florida, and then to Pennsylvania, near Harrisburg, which is the capital and two-and-a-half hours from Philly. Once I graduated high school, I moved to Brooklyn.

How’d you get into skateboarding?

I have two older brothers, Mitchell and Andrew. If one did something, we all had to do it. My oldest brother started, so we all had to start. I’ve been skating since I was around seven-years-old.

Were you always the dude with the camera, or was that later down the line?

This kid in our town [in Pennsylvania] made a little video when I was in seventh or eighth grade. He stopped filming immediately after, so I asked to borrow his camera to film my brothers and our friends. It was a shitty Panasonic with a baby Death Lens. After that, I got a bigger Panasonic, which was sort of the predecessor to the DVX. I ended up trading the Panasonic for a VX1000 to this dude in Long Island. I cannot believe that trade went through; I definitely got the better end of it. The dude even emailed me saying “I’m not really feeling this camera. Could we trade back?”

Alternate YouTube Link

Where’d you trade for it, Skate Perception?

Yeah, the kid who I originally got my first camera from had an account on there. He stopped filming, so he ended up giving me his camera, and eventually his Skate Perception password. He had 500+ posts, which grants you permission to post in the classifieds.

When I got the VX, I had no idea how to use it. This dude Kevin Winters, who made Bruns and has maybe five VX1000s, really helped me out with how to set everything up.

Were you only filming friends around your town at that point?

Both of my brothers went to college in Philly, and I was a senior in the middle-of-nowhere Pennsylvania, so I’d be going out to Philly every weekend to skate with them.

Endless Bummer: The New Palace Video

September 17th, 2014 | 12:00 pm | Daily News | 7 Comments

benny kickflip

You know how rappers drop mixtapes before the album? With the Palace video on the way, and intent on only including London footage, they just dropped the would-be mixtape before the “official” video, which may or may not be out by 2020. It includes street footage from trips to Los Angeles, their 2013 U.K. tour, Copenhagen, Paris, and probably some other parts of Europe that are less recognizable to the untrained eye.

Rather than go the Euro barge, edit-by-city route, this one features full parts from Rory Milanes, Lucien Clarke, Charlie Young, Karim Bakhtaoui, Benny Fairfax, Chewy Canon and Danny Brady. Guest tricks from Torey ♥, Rich Homie Juan, Powers and others.

Previously: The Annual PWBC News Segment

DJ Mustard For #SOTY

September 15th, 2014 | 11:15 am | Daily News | 12 Comments

leo gutman kickflip

2013 Q.S.S.O.T.Y, Leo Gutman – Flip kick. Photo by Mike Heikkila.

Hjalte Halberg with the noseslide of the year.

Johnny went HD. VX is [officially] dead. It was all good just a week ago.

The full story of how the Santa Monica Courthouse became a legal skate spot. Small banks restoration one day? Or does that make *too much* sense to ever happen?

Village Psychic has a #listicle of the ten best switch backside flips A.K.A. what Reynolds may or may not have once referred to as “the hardest trick.” It might be less of “the hardest trick” and more of the hardest trick to do well i.e. not have it horrendously barrel roll one inch off the ground to a standstill landing, thus discouraging anyone from publicly trying to get better at it.

Dudes in San Jose love khaki cargo shorts.

Rory Milanes is turning pro in 2020 when the Palace video comes out.

Enough with dudes skating in suits for videos filmed with fancy cameras. That shit was maybe cool once, and even that’s pushing it. With that being said, it is cool that Arto Saari got a pass to skate inside the Helsinki airport. You can file that under things that will never ever ever ever ever happen in the U.S.

The inventor of the tornado spin is still a leading quarterpipe innovator in 2014.

Somebody ollied the bump-to-bar at Wavy’s. (Not the best angle though.) He also grinded the Philly step before it. We might’ve had conversations about how Luis hypothetically wouldn’t even ollie that thing. We’re dumb.

Got to respect these guys for A) Basing ~75% of their “Summer Trip to New York” clip at the T.F. and South 5th monument plaza / proverbial Williamsburg T.F. and B) Not skating a single ledge over a foot in height throughout it.

Japan’s Rua Magazine has a video interview segment with Jahmal Williams from when he was out there for the Static IV premiere.

Billy Waldman is building an ark out of solar panels.

Quote of the Week
Observant Gentleman: “I wish I was fat so I could skate pools well.”
Alexander Mosley: “Fat people skate transition better, but there’s a lot you can do that they can’t. You’re not gonna see a fat person doing backside 180 nosegrinds.”

That Brooklyn Lockwood spot is allegedly harder to skate than actual Lockwood?

An Interview With Akira Mowatt

September 12th, 2014 | 1:02 pm | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

akira mowatt by corn

Photo by Corn

Growing up, there was never a ton of footage from younger New York dudes. Most of the guys from the old Zoo videos, EE3, etc. had begun waning out of skateboarding by that point. Akira was tangibly closer to all of us in age; there weren’t a whole lot of New Yorkers you’d see in videos then who weren’t a good ten years older than you. His Vehicle ad of the ollie over the bar at Ziegfeld is still one of the sickest tricks done in this city (nobody has stepped to that spot since.) Seeing footage of Akira was cool because New York footage was still sparse at the time, and hey, “He’s not much older than me.” Except after a while, he sorta disappeared.

Fast forward and he’s been on it these past five or so years. He posts Instagram videos of himself at the skatepark at 8 A.M., puts out video parts, learns new tricks at the rate of someone half his age, and is an embodiment of the fact that nobody has any excuses. You’re never too old, too rusty or too busy. Below is a quick conversation about where he went, and where he is today.

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It’s still a trip to hear you speak fluent Japanese. What is your background originally?

I’m from Okinawa. Japanese was my first language. I went to American school out there, but once I got to New York when I was 12, I was speaking a broken up Japanese version of English. Eventually I started hanging with kids out here and it cleared up.

Where did you start skateboarding?

My friends in Japan would skate a little bit, but it was more of a curiosity than a real interest. I left Japan and moved to Houston and Suffolk with my dad around 1995 or ’96 because my parents got divorced and a bunch of shit happened. My dad was psycho, so I bounced.

When I moved out here, I remember hearing skateboard wheels all around the streets. One day, I was walking my dog and heard a board snap, I turned around, and saw a skate shop called Swish, which was on St. Mark’s, near where the pizza store on Avenue A is now. I saw Harold Hunter putting his board together and was blown away that there were skaters in my neighborhood.

Harold was like “Cool dog.” I was never out here before, so I thought skateboarding was a whole different thing. I thought, “Whoa, a black dude skating? This is crazy” because I was still thinking of it in terms of who I saw skating in Japan. He asked me if I skated and I said “kinda” because I still had this board my mom bought me when I left Japan. I ran home, and next thing you know, he was showing me around Astor, Union and Washington Square.

Filmed by Bradley Cushing and Goshi Goto

Did you meet all the locals from that time through Harold? When everyone my age was growing up, you were like the one “young” dude at Supreme and everyone else was way older than us.

There was always this bonding factor with a lot of New York kids back then. A lot of them have problems at home or they’re runaways, so we’d stay up all night just hanging at Astor or Union and never go home.

I think Harold gave the word to Jeff Pang that I was progressing a bit and Zoo started flowing me boards. Eventually I started to meet A-Ron [Bondaroff] and all these people who didn’t necessarily skate, but still ran in that same circle. A-Ron took me under his wing since I spoke Japanese. He’d always have me helping out at Supreme until eventually I got a job there.





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