We’re Chilling Until We’re Not

April 20th, 2015 | 9:52 am | Daily News | 7 Comments

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Pete Thompson / @peetigga is the best skate photography Instagram going right now. Tons of unseen late nineties and early 2000s shots with many familiar faces. Stevie @ SF’s Third and Townsend bump from that archive ;)

An hour-long skate nerdery-laden conversation with Michael Carroll.

Life is goodie.

Diamond Days #80. That curb next to the Williamsburg Bridge is the new hot spot, huh? I dunno man, I’ve been away :(

“Resurgent bowls, abrupt transitions and even the vert ramp seem to have splintered handrail skating into restless and nomadic tribes, including displaced wallriders, wall-rejecting against-the-grainers, deep-crouching over-the-toppers, body varialing rewinders and a Mariano-bred stripe of small-bar uber-tech.” Boil the Ocean on handrail skating’s midlife crisis.

An interview with @Koolmoeleo, the guy who-more-or-less took the reigns from Chromeball as the leading skateboard magazine scanner on the internet.

Quadruples down the Stuyvesant Town rail.

Bronx-heavy clip with a Watermelons cameo and avant garde pants supervision.

Bobshirt interviewed Jahmal. (Chill shot of Jahmal in the Thompson archive, btw.)

New mini video from Cooper Winterson with a lot of still snowy streets, Welcome boards, and cutty New York spots that pretty much nobody else skates.

An unexpectedly high volume of Londoners are good at kicklip backside noseblunts.

Westgate ollies over a car and wants you to buy trees.

Congratulations to the city and skateboarders of Montreal on the full legalization of skating at Peace Park. “You have to be mentally strong to skate Peace Park.”

Meanwhile, in New York. Whatever, see you this summer, Europe.

So the diamond-plate bank on Grand and Centre Streets that everyone gets stuck at for way too long at least once every half year is a wrap.

Derrick Rose Pulls Off Perfect 720 At Local Skate Park.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: This post-playoff elimination Russell Westbrook YouTube mix with 60 views. It’s just not fair man :(

Quote of the Week: “I missed my flight one time, so I made myself take the A train back home from JFK as punishment.” — Sweet Waste

Though The Barter 6 has dominated the majority of rap-related conversation this past weekend, allow us to remind you that the QS Rap Desk’s favorite happy rap group has a new one over on Live Mixtapes. Travie’s had a quiet past twelve months, and it’s sad they weren’t allotted a Rae Sremmurd-esque super producer co-sign in like ~2010, but they’re still the go-to when you get sick of rappers telling you they’re gonna shoot you in their Alexander Wang gear. Praise be to happy rap music :)

An Interview With Budapest’s Rios Crew

April 17th, 2015 | 4:55 am | Features & Interviews | 6 Comments

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There aren’t many videos coming out today that don’t remind you of twenty other videos that came out today. Skaters love to think they’re special ‘n shit, but fall back on formulas just like Hollywood. (Currently kicking an idea around the editor’s desk where we rank the Bronze knock-offs the way NY Mag ranked the Taken rip-offs.)

Last year’s Toló video was something different. Not that it didn’t have it’s influences — the QS post for it made a tongue-in-cheek comparison to New Jersey vids — but it didn’t look like anything else being thrown out on the internet at that time or time since. It helped that it came from a secluded (by skate industry standards) former Soviet-bloc country known as Hungary, via the “Rios Crew.” Their subsequent projects have been frequent and just as fun to watch. They’re on the shortlist of videos left in Hella Clips/IG-era skateboarding that are fairly certain to earn repeat viewings.

These guys speak varying levels of English. Instead of doing a massive group interview, we had the dudes with the best command of the English language mold the crew’s answers into one unifying response. Most of the names wouldn’t make individual sense to you anyway, so here is an interview with Hungary’s Rios “Crew.”

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What is the skate scene in Hungary like? Is Budapest the capital for it?

The skate scene is just as colorful as in the States, but with less skaters. The total population of Hungary is around 8.5 million, which is the same number of people you have in New York. There are maybe a thousand skaters in Budapest and let’s say another thousand spread throughout the country.

Skateboarding has been around in Budapest since the early eighties, but Hungary was still a communist country until 1989, so the first shop and park didn’t open until about 1991. Before that, you had to get gear from western countries. There are stories about guys who were selling H-street boards and other stuff before the first shop opened. There were skaters around back then, but it was never a common thing. The scene got quite heavy in the nineties and 2000s. We even had names like Rodney Mullen, Ed Templeton and Ethan Fowler in Budapest giving demos around in those years.

Every generation had a different central spot and shop. Our generation’s central spot was a square that was surprisingly built for skating around 2003, but after an accident, skating got banned there and it turned into a typical shitty pre-fab skatepark. It’s in the total center of the city and always crowded. We don’t go there.

We always meet at our D.I.Y. spot, Rió.

Huf’s Favorite Photos

April 15th, 2015 | 5:20 am | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

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If you run a New York-based skate website for nearly ten years, it’d make sense to get Keith Hufnagel onboard for something along the line. Except there isn’t a ton of unchartered territory for an interview after the Epicly Later’d series or anything of that sort. Huf already had a Chromeball guest post, and this is not much more than a geographically constrained bite of that idea.

There aren’t a ton of proper “parts” from when Huf and that generation of skaters were growing up skating in New York, but a bunch of memorable photos. Here are Keith Hufnagel’s favorite New York skate photos, with a bit of commentary on each one.

Still in Miami

April 13th, 2015 | 5:03 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

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Thanks to everyone who grabbed something from the webstore this past week. We’re just getting caught up with orders now, so please hold any “Where’s my stuff”-emails until at least the middle of the week. Still some sizes in hoodys, shorts and jerseys left, plus all sizes of the tees except the Vacation one :)

HD video blog #10 via Johnny Wilson. Springtime is nice.

Part two of the Peter Smolik and Brandon Turner Weekend Buzz is now live. He hates food pics. “Motherfucker, do I look like Slimer to you?”

Sort of on that same note, can’t recall an interview that really elaborated on just how much money the average “A-list” pro skateboarder made in the early-2000s as Jenkem’s new one with Kenny Getz re: “the CKY era.”

Someone on Slap scanned the entire Olson TWS cover interview in a readable resolution. All New York photos. He does darkslides now.

Wenning was stressed out filming for Photosynthesis ten days before deadline.

After numerous false starts at digitizing their archive, Know Skate and TWS announced that every 411VM segment will be available via an app by the end of this year. (ICYMI: Somewhat relevant old QS post.)

Haven’t seen much from this dude as of late, but glad he’s still putting out solid parts: New one from Austin Kanfoush. Boardslide S.F. 3-up-3-down is super chill.

Cool five-minute montage from the NJ Skateshop squad.

NY Skateboarding has a bit more info on the skatepark being built in place of the Fat Kid Spot. And yes, they should keep the name “Fat Kid Spot” for it, with the green Parks Department leaf under the name and all. Don’t forget that there’s also supposed to be a new park built in Harlem for the summer, too. (Even though #lenox4ever.)

SMLTalk on the music supervision of THPS, the soundtrack of your youth.

Live has a web premiere of “Grapevine,” a ten-minute, largely New York-based video with quick VX/night footage-heavy #Japanese ‘n #French #vibez.

This was a cool read. These “20 Years of Girl / Chocolate” interviews tend to all go down similar lines of questioning, but it feels like there aren’t a ton of Jeron Wilson interviews out there, so…

The first-ever Vans video, Propeller, is premiering in New York on May 1st, at 10 P.M., right by Columbus Circle on 62nd and Broadway.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Can’t imagine J.R. Smith being a person younger NBA players should be taking much advice from, unless he’s relaying proper post-4 A.M. club etiquette… Get well soon, Chris Copeland. Also on the topic of former Knicks, glad to see Galinari shining post-injury.

Quote of the Week:

tbird

Bronze 56k x Star Wars — Japan only exclusive.

An Interview With Philly Santosuosso

April 10th, 2015 | 4:00 am | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

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Photo by G. Dagostaro

Most people do not know much about skateboarding in New Orleans. You can walk down a major city’s downtown anywhere in America and bet on seeing at least a few skateable things. When you walk around downtown New Orleans, where the few tall buildings are, and there’s next to nothing. (Places like that make me feel bad about writing things like this, even as a joke.) Its first public skatepark has been entangled in red tape for years. Its most recognizable skater might be Lil’ Wayne.

Philly and Humidity have been our lens into New Orleans’ underreported skate scene for years now, a city that manages to make something out of not very much.

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Not many people think of New Orleans as a skate city. How did you first get into skating down there?

My half brother got into skating when I was eight or nine, then quit, and I kept going. There was a small indoor park called Second Nature, which was run by the best skaters in the city. I hung out there, and they had a skate shop that you could rent skate videos from. I would watch a lot of 411s, video after video, and that exposed me to what was going on in skating. I ended up riding for the shop inside the park when I got a little older.

What was the scene like at that time? It feels like it never gets much coverage.

Duane Pitre is from here, and was riding for Alien Workshop around that time. The first actual skateboard I bought was off his grandma, who owned poodle grooming shop where she also sold his boards. Dyrdek would come down — when Dyrdek ollies over a shopping cart off a little bump in Mind Field in one of his little clips from when he was younger — that’s actually in New Orleans. Sal Barbier is also from here, so there was a good community of skateboarders at that time when I was first starting to skate.

I didn’t even know New Orleans sucked for skating until later.

Filmed by Thom Musso / The Man Who Films

Why do you say you realized it sucked?

First, the park closed down. Then, the first Zero video came out, which was sick, but really bummed me out on skating. I saw that everything was about jumping down shit. In New Orleans, we have like one eight-stair and couldn’t really follow in that direction. I was young, so I got a bit more into BMX instead, building dirt jumps and shit, being a kid, you know?