TRENDWATCH 2012: Is This 2013’s Biggest T-Shirt?

For the second year in a row, the Palace triangle has dominated graphic tee shirt marketshare at Tompkins Square Park. That does nothing to stop eager trend forecasters from looking for the *next big thing* in the awfully difficult-to-predict world of graphic tee shirts.

A prominent Upper West Side ex-Lurker wearing a shirt to support his neighborhood gourmet / kosher grocer (pictured above, top left) is nothing out of the ordinary, but leading analysts have started to see this particular garment increase in visibility throughout the past six-month cycle of skate footage. Its most notable appearance was in a Barcelona-set Mark Suciu throwaway clip. Now that the shirt has been adopted by west coasters with east coast sensibilities, analysts scramble to determine if this 80th & Broadway establishment’s sole foray into graphic tees could dethrone the current London-based triangular juggernaut, and return a sizable piece of the market back to New York’s local economy (previously occupied by Autumn.)

If optimistic projections hold true, and this garment gains traction into our summer 2013 trend report, the implications would be immense. It would make Zabar’s the first kosher skate apparel company, possibly resulting in increased Jewish investment within skateboarding. Also, other New York-based grocers like Fairways, Gristedes, and even low-end outfits like C-Town and Associated would have no choice but to play catch-up in this largely untapped market.

“I be poppin’ on my skateboard, tryin’ to learn a new trick”

Hella teaked one-foot backside tailslide over the grate, bro

“I be popping on my skateboard, trying to learn a new trick / I just fucked an Avatar, now I got a blue dick.” – Dwayne Carter

KCDC Skateshop teamed up with Complex magazine to bring you a list of the 25 best skateboard graphics of 2011. They had some glaring omissions, most notably Skate Mental’s “Creeping on a Set-Up” Bone Thugs homage, and our homie Jonah Miller’s “Stay Hungry” series for RAW New England. (RAW’s Cormega board is pretty cool too.)

Never saw this Flipmode-affiliated clip from 2009 before. Phil Rodriguez kills it, there’s footage from the UWS-favorite Soldiers and Sailors Monument, and proof that human beings actually skate(d) the original metal Rockaway Park, which, if you remember, got Hurricane Irene’d real bad.

NYSkateboarding linked up some photos by Yuri Shibuya last week. There are seven small galleries of New York-based stuff spanning from 1998 to 2008 over on YuriShibuya.com. The resolution on all of them unfortunately sucks. To make up for it, there’s a photo of Ted Barrow on there, switch crooking a Philly step on Hester Street. (Fun anecdote: We got kicked out of that spot in 2004 by a Chinese man wielding a butcher knife and haven’t been back since.)

Continuing along with the whole “IS VHS THE NEW SUPER-8?” thing

Just because you can do a hardflip late flip, doesn’t mean you should. Gross. (Ok, if you’re playing P.J. Ladd or P-Rod in S.K.A.T.E. for some reason, you can do a hardflip late flip.)

Here’s one for the economics majors specializing in broke skateboarder diets: Do dollar burgers serve as a legitimate threat to New York’s burgeoning dollar slice industry? With McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King all charging over $1 for burgers, and even dollar hot dogs quickly becoming a thing of the past, can this new trend sustain itself and expand into more skateboarder-heavy neighborhoods? (The one in question is on 39th, on the westside, and there are no spots nearby.)

Quote of the Week:

+++ Follow Quartersnacks on Twitter
+++ Become a Fan of Quartersnacks on Facebook

There’s Always Next Year

We kept wishing 1999 would show up. 2010-2011 was a good building block of a season. The future doesn’t look as dim as we’ve grown to expect it.

Let’s get the most important news out of the way: Soulja Boy is set to remake Juice, the 1992 film starring Tupac and Omar Epps. Somewhere deep in his subconscious, Giglotti’s hip-hop side is screaming blasphemy. Cam’ron is said to have a role in the ambitious remake, but his track record with completing motion pictures is somewhat iffy. In other words, what happened to Cousin Bang?

Ladies and gentlemen, here is Theodore Barrow skating Stoner Park.

Haven’t skated Jersey City in quite some time, so perhaps this is a bit late, but there’s a new medium-sized gap right next to that building on Second Street and the Hudson River with all the [knobbed] step-up ledges.

You have no doubt seen Ty Evans’ video with a pair of twelve-year-old twins being better at skateboarding than the entire tri-state area if it were combined into one person, but something about it screams for a “Grove Street Party” re-edit. Perhaps even some Pastor Troy.

A friend is casting for a full-length film he is doing, which happens to require people who can actually skateboard for their roles. Go here for more info on the film, and a breakdown of the available roles. It’s the sort of thing that probably requires acting abilities, unlike most skateboarder “castings” in New York. Basically, not like that “All the girls standing in line for the bathroom” video shoot, when they told you to “dress like a skater…wear a flannel,” and it ended early because someone got stabbed.

Not sure who put this together, but it’s a straight-foward 23 minutes of (mostly) New York skating, with no annoying songs, and many Flipmode favorites. Should be enough to get you through the early part of the week.

Here’s the Mandible Claw New York section / intro from the crew’s new video. If people start treating that ledge through the keyhole at Saint Vincent’s as an actual spot, we will reach a new, even more absurd height in terms of “what’s considered a ‘spot'” in New York.

Never really been into Skate Talk, but here’s a compilation of the Antwuan Dixon, “fresh out of jail” episode. Subject matter and slang editorials make it interesting.

Quote of the Week:That dude’s rat tail is really making me want to party.” — T-Bird

+++ Follow Quartersnacks on Twitter
+++ Become a Fan of Quartersnacks on Facebook

Merry Christmas

Here’s the annual jazzy mood piece. Filmed throughout the past three months. Twenty-percent of the total eleven minutes was filmed on one miraculous twenty-five degree night in Midtown, something that is otherwise unprecedented in all of our over-eighteen-years-of-age existences. Complete Christmas miracle if there ever was one. Thanks to everyone who supported, visited, and spread the word about Quartersnacks this past year. First person who points out the grape soda BGPs gets a free Quartersnacks tee shirt (when the second batch comes in, which should be relatively soon.) Somebody please buy Josh a set of white wheels for Christmas, the lime is really starting to offend everyone. He’s “dreaming of a white-wheeled Christmas.”

Features: Jason Lecras, Tyler Tufty, Connor Champion, Max Palmer, Dennis Feliciano, Josh Wilson, Jersey Dave, Shawn Powers, Matthew Mooney, Billy McFeely, Torey Goodall, Vladamir Kirilenko, Thando Beschta, DJ Roctakon, Ted Barrow, Ty Lyons, Emilio Cuilan, Gabe Tennen, Pad Dowd, Galen Dekemper, Miles Marquez, Alexander Mosley, Josh Velez, Andre Page, Kevin Tierney, Geo Moya, Isak Buan, some lil’ kids, Pryce Holmes.

Big thank you to the contributing filmers: Andre Page, Dennis Feliciano, Paul Young, Joe Bressler, Martin Wilson, Larry Bao, Paulgar.

What’s the song for the Christmas clip?
John Coltrane. Nothing too crazy.
That’s corny.
The last clip I made was to ‘Fly Like a G6,’ give me a break.

Here’s an external link to download the clip as an .M4V for iPhones and iPods. 147.8MB. YouTube version here.

The Events That Defined New York City Skateboarding in 2010: 15-11

Took a week off from the countdown, sorry. There will probably be two of these posts this week. Moving on with the retrospective…#25-21, #20-16.

15. The Dipset Reunion

It is no secret that video part song choices are crucial to developing musical preferences of all those who have grown up on skate videos. From the punk rock of the 1980s, to the indie shit that accompanies any emotional “skating is an art, bro” video of today, skateboarding has a much closer tie-in with music than traditional sports, whose typical soundtrack ranges from “Kernkraft 400” to “I Like To Move It Move It.” If you came of age in the early 2000s, the impact of Dipset, and its days of making era-defining opuses of ignorance, cannot be understated. The reunion was a beacon of hope for all of those who miss the magic that defined early-to-mid-2000s skateboarding — when the internet, skate plazas, reality shows, and awful rap dynasties like Young Money were not a part of the cultural landscape. The reunion was also a chance for New York rap to get another shot at the previous-decade-dominating rap comeback, as Wu-Tang’s return in the 2000s was hardly worth the attention it was given.

Keep Reading »