Josh Velez’s Quaranteam Part

Anybody selling hard goods can attest to the “skateboard boom” that began in the lockdown months. People who had not picked up a board in years because life got in the way were buying new completes because, like, wtf else was there to do?

But what about those who never let life entirely get in the way of skating? For them, this past spring was a tidal wave of free time that no gainfully employed adult skateboarder thought they would experience until they were retired with bad knees. It was a pass to be 17 again, at least for a bit.

As outlined in 2019’s outing, Josh has been on a half-decade streak of filming parts mostly on his two days off from work a week. For a sizable chunk of 2020, there was no work, so this year’s is an extended edition — complete with cameos from some extended QS family members who haven’t popped up in an edit for deep.

Edited by Eric Cruz. Appearances from Connor Champion, Kevin Tierney, Troy Stilwell, Zach Baker, Kadeem Walters, Ty Lyons, Meatball, Ryan Santiago, Cyrus Bennett, Haffa, Antonio Durao, Ron Parker.

Anarchist Jurisdiction

Photo by Tobin Yelland

(Saw that comments weren’t working for most of last week. That issue has [*hopefully*] been fixed. If you’re a devout QS commenter and still getting an error, hit us on social or e-mail.)

“Every interview cemented that yeah, he accomplished a lot but it was about skateboarding and that actually meant something that he fostered: growing a community by supporting people you believe in.” Anthony Pappalardo the Writer wrote a bit about Huf’s impact on him as an east coaster with teen eyes on San Francisco in the nineties.

Village Psychic re: “Huf & Friends” from Interface.

TWS rounded up the words and tributes from fellow pro skaters about the influence Keith Hufnagel had on their lives ♥

All remaining QS tees + whatever else we have left is on sale for cheap on our webstore. Mostly smalls and mediums left ♥ Thanks for your support, as always.

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Skate Rave @ Vans Space 198

And on a day when the wind-chill brings the temperature down to 12 degrees, we bring you some… good news.

Space 198, the new free, INDOOR Vans park is opening on January 2nd at 198 Randolph Street in Brooklyn. Unlike the belated House of Vans, which was more of an event space inside of a skatepark (and brought out people’s inner savages anytime there was a mid-winter open day there), this park is a community-oriented space built for skateboarding.

It’s going to be open Thursday through Sundays — you just need to to sign up on the website beforehand. And it’s off the Jefferson L stop in Bushwick, making everyone’s life a bit easier than a 20-minute walk through the snow to Greenpoint that we used to do ;)

As they were putting the finishing touches on it, they gave a handful of crews the chance to check out the park last week, and here’s what we came back with. Be nice to Jersey Dave when you see him, because chances are, his phone has not stopped buzzing for the past two weeks.

Filmed by Will Rosenstock, Paul Young, Max Hull, Cristian Berrios & Kyota Umeki.

Meet Me At The Mall — The Skateable History of Allen Street

According to The Street Book: An Encyclopedia of Manhattan’s Street Names and Their Origins, Allen Street gets its name from William Henry Allen, the youngest Navy captain in the War of 1812. (Our then-recent ex, Great Britain, was beefing with Napoleon while America stayed neutral. The U.S. was trying to send a flow box to France, and Britain felt some type of way about it. Like any bitter ex who sees someone else wearing your hoody after a messy break-up, they went to war.)

Legend has it that Allen was in the English Channel on the hunt for ops, when he stumbled on a Portuguese cargo ship carrying wine. Him and the squad had a wild night with the haul, but unfortunately, got caught slipping by the British on the following day. Allen and his crew’s colossal hangover would be their last: British canons shot off his leg, and he would die on August 18, 1813.

200 years later, L.E.S Skatepark was born.

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One Big Court, Full Of Brown Benches

Right now, the most Insta-famous street spot in New York is a Williamsburg basketball court with a couple plastic benches.

Prior to this spring — with the exception of a few loose video appearances — they’ve just been sitting there.

“Are those plastic?” A group of young men would observe, and keep skating onward to the Monument, onward to Reggaeton Ledges, onward to see if anything new and interesting had been built on the waterfront.

“There’s a whole city out there! Why waste time on recycled plastic?!”

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