Time For GRoEth

Happy birthday Vert God ♥ Photo by Cole Giordano

Diego Donival’s new video, Potluck is premiering at Village East Cinemas this Wednesday, December 11. Showings at 7:45 & 8:45. Features parts from Kyota Umeki, Sully Corimer, Quinn Batley, Isaac White, Caleb Yuan, Marcello Campanello and Yaje Popson. Teaser here + flyer here.

Favorite thing from this past week? This 45-second Vincent Touz mix that Johnny Wilson posted on IG.

Jake Kuzyk’s new one is called “Kick Back,” and is effectively a sequel to Courtesy, except this time for Spitfire instead of Vans. Features most of the Alltimers team, Chris Milic, Diego Todd, Nick Michel, and Jed Anderson. Dustin’s three-trick line at the brick bank in downtown Vancouver is fire.

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The Best Skateboard Videos of the 2010s — QS Reader Survey Results

Illustration by Cosme Studio

This was the decade that the full-length skate video was supposed to die. We began the 2010s with everyone insisting that Stay Gold would be the last full-length skate video. Then, Pretty Sweet was supposed to be the last full-length video. Some people thought that Static IV would be it — the end, no more full-lengths after that. But I feel like I heard someone say Josh was working on something new a couple months back? Idk.

The experience might’ve changed. We’re not huddling around a skate house’s TV covered in stickers to watch a DVD bought from a shop anymore (if this past weekend is any indication, it’s more like AirPlaying a leaked .mp4 file via a link obtained from a guy who knows a guy), but the experience of viewing a fully realized skate video with your friends for the first, second or twentieth time is still sacred.

Just as we asked for your votes for the five best video parts, we did the same for the five best full-lengths: if you could choose the five videos that defined the 2010s, what would they be? The results were a bit more surprising than the parts tally in some ways, given that it felt like independent, regional and newer, small brand videos dominated the decade, yet Big Shoe Brands™ and Girl + Chocolate still made their way into the list. The top-heaviness of some companies or collectives was less of a surprise, in that certain creators loomed large over the 2010s.

Like the installment before it, this list is sans comment for 20-11, and then via favors from writer friends for the top ten: here are the twenty best skate videos of the past ten years.

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The Best Skate Video Parts of the 2010s — QS Reader Survey Results

Illustration by Cosme Studio

Back in October, we asked QS visitors to choose their favorite video parts of the 2010s. If civilization and skateboarding were to end today, which five parts would you bury in a weather-and-nuclear-proof time capsule for post-apocalyptic earth dwellers to reference when they rediscover skate culture of these past ten years?

QS prides itself as being a destination for people who think a lot about skateboarding. Rather than poll a few close colleagues for their favorites, we felt we had a wide enough reverberation in the skate nerd universe to try and crowdsource a canon of the 2010s from anyone willing to sit down and think about it. I can emphatically say that in reviewing the mountain of ballots, everyone took their votes seriously — save maybe the guy who voted for five Micky Papa parts.

As we tallied the results, consistent trends in the count were apparent. Any fears about a recency bias went out the window; there’s only one part from 2019, and the average year of the top 25 is 2014. QS obviously has its own breed of skate nerd audience — this poll would look different if taken by Thrasher or Free — but I would bet that their lists wouldn’t be TOO far off from this one.

Presented without comment for the top 25-11, and then via a lot of favors from writer friends on the internet for the top 10: here are the 25 best video parts of the past ten years.

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Real Skate Boy Don’t Know How To Work a Spot App

Via Charles Rivard, PhD.

Boil the Ocean offers up some reflections on Knowing Mixtape Volume 2, as does Canada’s King Shit magazine. Agree that “every single clip is extraordinary in some way.” Three-and-a-half years of filming for a 17-minute video has a way of doing that — even the bails they put in there stand out in a very particular way that other videos can’t pull off. Also! Tiago for S.O.T.Y. every year until they give it to him.

This upload is from August, but only catching it now: “Fasuad” is a fun homie video by Marc Pascua. It’s all filmed around the city with some cameos from Mark Suciu, Frankie Spears, et al., and edited to a song that they would play at the healing crystal and plants store by T.F.

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R.I.P. Fall ’19 — We Barley Knew You

Spread via @geometricskateshop on IG

Quartersnacks for Spitfire Wheels arrives in stores today. We will not be carrying this in our webstore, but have a lot of fab regs QS stuff in there if you’re trying to support. Any shop with a Deluxe account near you should be a safe bet though ♥ (And for anyone asking, yes there are both hard wheels and cruiser: hard wheel is Formula Four 53mm 99du, and soft wheel is 54mm 80du.)

“We did crime to fund it basically.” File this one under: Had no idea how much I would love this interview when I first started skimming it. You’re probably familiar with @muckmouth the Instagram page, you might be familiar with Muckmouth the website, but you probably aren’t familiar with Muckmouth the Auckland-based skate magazine. Free has an incredible interview with Muckmouth founder, Alex Dyer, about his journey through three generations of skateboard media that is full of stories to make you laugh and sit at the edge of your seat. “Where the fuck is Callum?”

Skating to one of the ten best songs ever recorded by humans is bold, but whatever, the world is gonna end soon anyway ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Justin Grzechowiak’s part in the Buffalo, New York-based Remedy video is a good time.

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