J.R. Smith Already Without A Shirt

QS is by no means a Laker enterprise — just trying to be supportive of any and all events that lead to joy in the life of shirtless icon, J.R. Smith. Also L O L L L L L L at him having as many titles as the entire New York Kn*cks franchise.

Theories caught up with a bunch of New York skaters to ask about their spot hunting stories from the initial COVID shutdown in the city. Those days when Natural History, CBS and Big Screen were all a go at once were magic amongst the shit ♥

Alex Klein wrote a piece on his friendship with Keith Hufnagel over on GQ.

Lurker Lou’s new part, “Lou Flowers” is now live ♥

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An Emblematic Document of Our Socially Distant Times: ‘COVIDEO-19’

It is the oldest joke ever told — older than the one about martinis and boobs, or the one about American healthcare.

“How many skateboarders does it take to screw in a lightbulb?”

Ha ha ha! “One to do it, one to film it, and another ten to say ‘Yeahhh!'” Ha ha ha!

But what about during a global pandemic? Suddenly, in the era of social distancing, those ten friends plus filmer cease to be C.D.C-compliant.

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Celebration Station

“I went from being a kid skating on my block to hanging out with all the best skaters in New York City because I learned how to do a frontside 360 boneless.” A friend once had a story about how their book club took a razor to The Powerbroker and sliced it up into three books to make it more reasonable of a read. This isn’t that dramatic, but a blog interview that takes over two hours to read is a lot for most people in the era of byte-sized #content — but we’re *SO* happy that people are putting detailed, rich content on the internet that requires a commitment! Isn’t that what it’s for?! The Slam City Skates blog’s interview with Eli Gesner about skateboarding + graffiti in New York in the 80s, night clubs in the early 90s, the beginnings of Shut + Zoo York, etc. is like a little history book :)

This skatepark was founded in 1906 by the Black Panther party.”

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Weekend Viewing: Jerry Mraz’s ‘Rust Belt Trap’ Part

As early as the start of this week, one of New Jersey’s finest young athletes issued a P.S.A. regarding the health risks of skating cellar doors. It was the approach that caught Mr. Maserati off-guard on this particular door, but that’s not the only peril involved. Bobby Puleo — another New Jersey athlete who spent much of his career battling these slanted portals to the netherworld — once told skateboarding’s archive of record that, “A lot of people have this perception that those things are ‘easy’ to skate. You hit that lock or that handle, it could be Beth Israel time.”

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Rust Belt Trap — An Interview With Jerry Mraz

Intro + Interview By Adam Abada
Headline Photo by Mac Shafer

If you live or skate in New York, chances are you’ve come across Jerry. In the sixteen years since he moved to New York City from Michigan, he has mostly left the warm familiarity of Lower East Side haunts to leave his mark elsewhere. If you haven’t caught him in the streets, you’ve probably skated his well-chronicled concrete work. From patching up must-see-for-visiting-pros spots like the Bronx bank-to-ledge to more meandering locales like the B.Q.E. spot, Jerry’s legacy is clear and present.

He just finished up a video called Rust Belt Trap, which acts as a great visual representation of his philosophy, practice, and craft — and we realized we have never formally spoken to him on QS. Thankfully, Jerry found a slot of time in between picking up 2 x 8’s at the lumber yard to update us on his life and work. (Rust Belt Trap is still due out on Thrasher at some point.)

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You’re from the Midwest but have been in New York for quite a while now. What’s keeping you here?

The fact that there’s something always happening. Even if you stay in and you feel like you’re missing something, that’s cool. A lot of the time, I just decide to stay home and know the whole world is still moving on and I’m fine with that. But when I was stuck in a small town, it was really moving on, and I felt like I was missing it go by.

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