Stuck On Earth

TWS interviewed a handful of pros and industry people about the effects of corona virus on the skate industry, as did Parade — except with a focus on small, independent skate brands (like QS!) The common theme between all of them is the resilience of skaters. Yes, shit is crazy right now, but skateboarding isn’t going anywhere once this is all over. The fact that Seattle is experiencing a slowdown in new cases (it was the first part of the country to get hit) is a tiny pinch of an indicator that social restrictions are working. Be safe, be patient, be supportive ♥ And while we know people go on QS to forget the noise of the outside world, if you want to read something COVID-19 related that’s responsibly reported and level-headed, this is the one.

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Streets Need That Muska Epicly Later’d Fam

muska

#jersey

Short of maybe an Epicly Later’d with the entire original Zoo York team (that’s never happening), it’s hard to think of one as desperately needed as one with The Muska.

The “Occasionally Awesome” Podcast dropped an episode with Ed Templeton yesterday, which tells the story of a fateful night when Muska got kicked off Toy Machine (at the 31:20 mark.) There’s no candidate equipped to tell the tale of the ~1998-to-mid-2000s “rockstar era” of skateboarding like The Muska. Kerry Getz is cool but he ain’t kick it with Paris Hilton et al in Las Vegas superclubs.

If you were to re-create a less-dark version of Boogie Nights, except base it on the turn of the millennium, pre-high speed internet skate industry rather than the porn industry at the advent of home video, the Dirk Diggler figure would have to be based on The Muska. (The Welcome to Hell premiere night is clearly the start of act two — it’s set up almost too perfect.) Paul Thomas Anderson probably lost my business card or something (I have the treatment ready to go man), but until he finds it, the crew over at VBS really needs to get it together and work some magic.

And let us not forget the time when Mike V. took on an entire security staff so he “could rescue The Muska from the bad guys.” It’s baffling why skateboarders keep finding themselves making these awful, heavy-handed motivational skate movies, when the most cinematic skate career just sits there as an anecdote on some Podcast with Ed Templeton for three minutes.

PTA, my e-mail is on the contact page.