Already Got Those

Five out of five Tompkins skaters agree that this is the best box ever made. Sadly, it’s on the other side of the planet. We got to talking about replicating it — anybody know any welders? (Real question.)

Holy big flip, here is an illicit link to Brandon Westgate’s part in the new Element video, Peace. (Read: Will probably get deleted.) Really sick to see him still gunning for it as hard as he was in the Stay Gold days, and on a lot of new/seldom-seen New England spots at that. Would comment on the THPS music, but Brandon Westgate never struck me as a skater who is too invested in music.

Not much other info on it, but “Background 1” is a fun lo-def video with a ton of faces you’ll recognize from Gang Corp edits, Tompkins, and L.E.S. Park. All street clips.

Nik Stain, Hjalte, Paul Grund, and Bobby DeKeyzer went to the best skate spot on the planet and other European destinations. Ben Chadourne on the beat.

Listen to Bobby Puleo fan out on the Gonz for five minutes. He’s really good at finding the right words to describe why certain small things make a trick or photo extra special.

I’ve found myself using the word “super” too much lately, too :( Gino Iannucci is the latest guest in an hour-long interview on Lee Smith’s podcast.

Always down to plug something that resurrects the lost art of the video review. Live gets all Boil the Ocean on us and uses a bunch of vocabulary stuff and long sentences to do a joint review of Doll and It’s Time, two videos that occupy space on opposite ends of the spectrum (and country.)

If you’re 30+, you’re bound to get emotional watching this nine-minute-long raw Pier 7 greatest hits compilation.

Enjoyed this more than the “pro snowboarder with some ‘summer trip to New York’ footage in his skate part” label prepared me for: Forest Bailey’s NYC/MTL/PDX-based “Florg” part.

Here is what is slated-to-be one of the final Elkin’s Tapes episodes, featuring a good bit of pre-groer Daniel Kim footage.

The general harshness of the world feels extra apocalyptic in an election year, but if you’re an optimist (or willing to turn your sights that way), I read this article (from April 2018) about the [good] ways in which American life is currently being reinvented on a micro level and felt fuzzy inside, at least for a bit ♥ Love you guys, and please go vote next Tuesday!

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: This four-second video encapsulates the entire history of the Brooklyn Nets. (And yes, if it was by a Knicks player, it’d encapsulate their past 17 years too obvs.)

Quote of the Week: “A Bennett grind is like another drunk tank trick.” — Dana Ericson re: someone else (forgetting who) originally coining a smith kickflip as being a “drunk tank trick.” (Hypothetical: Has there ever been a Bennett grind that’s been better than even the most generic switch back smith? Actually, nvm.)

A lot of parentheses this Monday. Mind’s all over the place. (Or something.)

A Short History of New York’s Longest Lines

Ricky Oyola, godfather of the east coast “filming a line via just skating random shit on the street”-practice, once expounded on his peak skateboard dream: doing a line through Philadelphia’s then-standing City Hall, into the street, up into the Municipal Services building, back down the stairs, across the street, into Love Park, through Love Park, and end at Wawa.

The closest he got on record was a line from the end of City Hall, through the intersection, and into Love Park in Eastern Exposure 2, but it did establish a lingering precedent for connecting spots. Apart from Ricky and that Joey O’Brien Sabotage 4 line where he starts at Love and ends up in the garage beneath it, spot connecting does not have a rich history in Philadelphia.

Or anywhere, really — because doing a line from one spot, through the street, and to another, is fucking hard. There are variables (people, traffic, pebbles, maybe two sets of security, acts of God), and a pressing anxiety of missing the final trick in an already-long line, which gets amplified by the fact that fifteen other things went right up until that point. As you will soon learn, spot connecting is something most people do for the sake of doing it. In the majority of cases, they stick to their safe tricks.

Like Philadelphia, New York is a dense and layered city. Many of its streets are narrow, and depending on where you are, three or four spots could be across from one another. New York never had a “Big Three,” but it does have three different types of benches on four different street corners, and over the years, skateboarders here have kept their third eyes open and far-sighted.

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Proper Shit Out

Keeping along with last week’s 76ers theme…

Been a slow start to the year out there. Pretty excited for this heatwave though.

Steve Mastorelli (the guy who made The Meadowlands last year) has a sick new edit up, which screened before the video at the NJ Skateshop Stop Fakin’ 3 premiere. Features a bunch of familiar north Jersey faces and spots.

One of the standout ex-pat / visitor in New York vids in recent memory — “Dice of Life: Twenty Eighteen.” Huge array of spots (shout out to everyone venturing out to the still-good spots that weathered locals otherwise gave up on), really sick skating (the line at the Escape From New York cathedral on Amsterdam is fucked + the varial heel at Southbridge Towers is sick too), and one of the best No Limit songs to start it off, though they only used the worst verse on it :)

Coda has new montage for 2018, with some wild moves, especially in the first part, which seemed like it was about to be filmed exclusively under the J train.

Kinda an interview with Aidan Mackey + photos from the roof of the former QS office.

R.B. Umali mashed up a bunch of his old footage to create a “15 Years of New York skateboarding” montage that covers 1995 to 2010, with the first ever (?) regular-motion footage of the best kickflip ever done.

#comebackwatch2018: 1) Never been the biggest fan, but the DC Lynx is *officially* coming back into their line. 2) Gino Iannucci’s onetime Long Island Skateshop, Poet’s, is being relaunched as a standalone brand. 3) The sneaker nerds were already up on this, but Nike’s Grandstand 2, which you might remember Reese Forbes wearing in his first-ever SB ad, is set to re-release sometime soon. (It’s not an SB model though.)

“I never thought I’d send DVDs to Iraq.” Solo has an an interview with Nick from The Palomino, the internet’s best skate shop ♥ You can find QS on there too obvs ;)

An ocean away and old, but new, but a #spotcheck nonetheless.

Ten years since Static 3 with Soy Panday and Danny Renaud.

“The backside 360 with that gentle and (sarcastically?) smug roll away off the ledge is the first trick I think of when I think of Bobby Puleo in Static II.” And on that same note…“musing on” Puleo’s part in the second Static video.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Russ being Russ ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Quote of the Week: “If you’re a guy who pays girls to kick you in the balls, you drink scotch.” — Barnes

Shout out to all the stable geniuses out there ;)

Skateboarding & Color Coordination — A Retrospective

A #NYFW Special Report

Words & Interviews by Frozen in Carbonite
Photo Collages by Requiem For A Screen

Skating writ large prides itself on a “no rules, bro!” ethos. #Menswear, an entity with which skating has become increasingly intertwined of late (via Vogue Skateboarding Magazine, etc.), has all kinds of rules. No black belt with brown shoes. No wearing white after Labor Day. One’s tie can’t go past one’s belt. Skating has no such faux pas — except for MAYBE brand-mixing — i.e. one can’t wear a Venture shirt if one is skating Indys or Vans socks if you’re wearing Nikes.

But what if I told you that skaters have curated their own sartorial code for decades — painstakingly color-coordinating their shoes, shirts, hats, and even spots? However, the modern-day thrift store aesthetic has left color-coordination by the wayside, even as color-blocking seemed to make a comeback last year, or some shit. So, in conjunction with New York Fashion Week, enjoy this retrospective of color coordination while you’re waiting to get into the Wang party or whatever.

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Snacks Is Rage

Conor Prunty by Max Hull, as seen in the new Shortwave Zine.

Rest in Peace Curtis Valentine.

“He does pretty hard tricks.” — Javier Sarmiento re: Jesus Fernandez. Part early Epicly Later’d, part “Day in the Life,” and all people just fanning out on what a great human — let alone skater — he is, Free Skate Mag‘s three part Jesus documentary is the positive force we need in all of our lives right now.

Public Housing Skate Team has a new nine-minute edit up, which includes a Jason Byoun part at the end.

Somehow missed this one when it first came out, but Heavenly is a sixteen-minute video of mostly Texas (?) dudes skating mostly New York spots. They lowkey went in on that Water Street rail-to-rock that Connor lipslid, and switch backside flip manual at the Brooklyn Tompkins park is insane.

When you take #RP-ing your friends’ tricks to another level.

“You didn’t want to do outdated tricks, you wanted to stay up because the tide was moving. As much as skateboarders, critics, journalists, or whoever is recording the timeline of skateboarding want to say that there are no rules, there always has been a wave. And you’re either in the front of the wave or behind the wave.” Bobby Puleo on a simple question for Village Psychic: “How do you feel about wallies?”

Oh yeah, Lamborghinis pull up into L.E.S. Park all the time.

A select few elevate flatground frontside 180s into art.

Ian Reid was down in Charlottesville photographing the protests two weekends ago, and gave NBC an interview about what he saw.

Spot Updates1) The bump on Howard and Crosby (~the old Vespa bump) had a rail put in its center. Someone got it. 2) Though it has been an off-and-on bust for the past several years, given all the beef over monuments in the U.S. right now, the cops have fully barricaded the ledges off at Columbus Circle.

August is a historically slow time for the skateboard internet, as it is for Hollywood, so let’s lighten the mood with some non-skate related links!1) And you thought the Chinatown fashion was crazy. These bootleg American t-shirts in Asia are insane. 2) Frankly, I’m sick of the Takeoff slander as well. 3) “It is possible to make a difference in the world without yelling.” A high school senior with some timely words for the NYT.

Quote of the Week: “Every skater is responsible for bringing their own wax.” — EJ

No, I haven’t listened to 4:44.