An Interview With Bryan From Dime

June 17th, 2015 | 6:24 am | Features & Interviews | 30 Comments

bryan-1

There are many unsung heroes in skateboarding. Local legends who never made it outside of their towns, skatepark builders who cede individual credit for the greater good, rogue bartenders who turn a blind eye to underage drinking at #skate #events are among them. But there’s one member of the skateboard family who truly never receives any credit: the warehouse guy. Where would Nyjah Houston be if not for the guy who physically takes his skateboards and Monster Energy memorabilia, and ships the box to him? Looking for a plank to drill eight holes into?

To give a glimpse of the skateboard-brand stock world, we hit up our Canadian friends at Dime, so they could grant us access to their always reliable and always smiling warehouse manager, Bryan.

+++++++

Tell us a bit about yourself Bryan. Where are you from? What was your upbringing like?

Hi, my name is Bryan. As Dime’s warehouse manager, I am a vital part of their supply chain process. I manage people, systems and make sure productivity targets are met. My goal is to make our customers happy. I love going out of my way to please strangers! I grew up in a small town called Kitchener, in Ontario, on a farm, as the only son of two very loving parents. My parents raised me to be a productive & happy person.

Did you always have a passion for stock? When did you first fall in love with packing boxes?

Growing up on a farm, I was always surrounded by little animals — cats, dogs, little chickens, & other meat products. Putting them in boxes really was a great source of pleasure for a young packer. Later, my love of packing evolved into packing more important things.

I believe the experience your customer receives when they order product from you should be flawless. If they ordered a size medium Dime Classic Tee, they should receive a medium size Dime Classic Tee. That is why I have developed the Dime Packaging Best Practices guide, as a tool that my team and I use to establish consistent packaging standards. By following these practices, I minimize cost and prevent delays, errors and damages. Failure to follow carton weight, size, or corrugated requirements could result in lost or damaged merchandise, delays, or additional charges and we’re not having any of that bullshit at Dime.

When did you move to Montreal? How did you come to work at Dime?

It was 2014, I was at a point in my life where I had to make some changes. Kitchener, being the hate crime capital of Canada, was a really negative environment and it forced me to make a choice. I moved to Montreal with my friend Jim, with hopes of a new beginning. We found our answer in the church [of Scientology]. I cannot overstate the value of Scientology’s teachings. We met the Dime guys at a “Cause of Suppression” class. They gave us a chance and hooked us up with entry level warehouse jobs at Dime. Through hard work and dedication, I climbed the corporate ladder and landed the warehouse manager position. Unfortunately, I had to fire Jim due to his alcoholism.

Five Favorite Parts With Danny Brady

June 12th, 2015 | 5:05 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

brady back tail

Photo via Hit You Off Management

Figure it’s been a while since we did one of these with a non-American. Here you go.

An Interview With Jason Byoun + Remix Contest

June 3rd, 2015 | 10:52 am | Features & Interviews | 23 Comments

jason grab by colin

Photo via Colin Sussingham

The most experimental, controversial, subversive, and Vine-friendly skateboarder working in New York City today. Interview by Jesse Alba and Genesis Evans. Scroll to the bottom for details on the re-edit contest.

+++++++

Where are you from and what’s your favorite board company of all time?

I’m from Monteville, New Jersey, which is near Parsippany and Towaco, and my favorite board company is Creature.

What nationality are you?

American.

But what about ethnic background?

Korean. 100%.

How did you start skating?

My friend Lynden from New Jersey got me into skating. He had a Popwar board, with Phantom Two trucks, orange Spitfire wheels and riser pads. We were chilling in my basement and he had to take a shit. My basement is carpeted, so I stood up on his board and learned how to ollie in the time it took him to take a shit. Then I got on CCS and ordered a board.

When I was learning how to ollie, my cousin told me that Stevie Williams learned to ollie on his second try.

In my first week of skating, everyone I grew up with told me it took them years to learn tricks. I was just like “Nah, first week, I’m gonna learn how to kickflip,” just so I could call them and tell them I did it.

Where did you skate in New Jersey?

I grew up skating in a town where the main spot was a basketball court and rec center, sort of like Tompkins. It was outside, but in the wintertime, they’d put an air bubble over it. My mom had a mini van and we’d put a box and a Zero flatbar in it to bring over there.

How about Chris Cole leaving Zero for Plan B?

I haven’t been keeping up with that to be honest. Chris Cole was actually my first favorite skater. Ryan Sheckler and Chris Cole.

Who are your favorite skaters now?

Paul Rodriguez, Phil Rodriguez, Brian Tober, Adam Zhu and Nate Rojas.

‘What Is Erotic Skate Fiction?’ – An Interview With Andrew Brown A.K.A. Roctakon

May 27th, 2015 | 5:21 am | Features & Interviews | 15 Comments

roctakon_crew

The party has always been in the peripheral view of the events, people and skateboard tricks featured on this website. We like to have a good time.

Longtime friend and oft-uncredited Quartersnacks music supervisor, Andrew Brown A.K.A. Roctakon, put the finishing touches on his novel — a first-ever piece of erotic skate fiction. Just like a good video makes you want to go out and skate, a good piece of erotic skate fiction makes you want to skate and go out (with some room for self-reflection in between), and that’s exactly what None of the Bad Ones set out to do.

Interview by Dances, one of the world’s greatest cultural commentators.

+++++++

What is an “erotic skate novel?”

Erotic skate fiction is a term that my buddy Galen coined. He’s the Dollar Stories guy. You might have seen him wandering around the streets of New York in neon clothing selling stories to people. He made up that term at a time when we were both writing a bunch. There was always skating and sex in the stories…I guess it’s a novel with skateboarding and sex. It has a nice ring to it.

What time period is your book set?

It’s New York in 2009 or 2010. There are no specific dates, but everyone is still on Blackberrys. Everything is BBM.

Do you still skate?

Yeah, I still skate, but I’m 36. I’ve never been good and I’m getting worse. I can do flatground and skate a ledge. If I’m in a bowl or something, I look like a dad who is skating for the first time.

Do you feel that dating as a skater puts you in a certain zone?

Kind of, especially in New York. I haven’t lived there for a little while, but I imagine it’s the same. There are a lot of young girls that do creative things, and skaters are like the athletes for those girls. If a regular girl wants to bang the quarterback, a hip girl wants to bang the hot skater. Skaters are filthy, so there’s a self-loathing kind of thing with them. It’s a weird thing. But some girls don’t like skaters at all.

It’s either skaters or graf writers.

If you’re the girl who likes graf writers, you might be even more disturbed than the girl who likes skateboarders. Those guys are an odd bunch.

Skaters With Jobs: A Special Investigative Report

May 20th, 2015 | 11:39 am | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

andrew_wilson_wallride_ready_set

Photo via Colin Sussingham

A job is like kryptonite to a skateboarder. A normal schedule, conceding to authority figures, responsibility — these bare minimum characteristics of employment are pretty unappealing. Many skaters’ job histories involve quitting abruptly or getting fired hungover. It’s not exactly an activity that promotes “growing up,” at least in the traditional sense.

One of the most commonly asked questions by people on the outside looking into New York skateboarding is “How do you afford to live there?” San Francisco might’ve just knocked us off for highest cost-of-living in America, but surviving here still costs a lot, especially if you’re intent on staying for more than a summer or two. A bit has been written on jobs in skateboarding; there’s less information out there on what type of jobs most skateboarders actually have. For as long as many of my friends have been above adult working age (post-“slumming it out to avoid any semblance of responsibility”-age), a sizable portion of them have worked for set companies.

This may come as a surprise, but a set company makes sets. The background of most ads or commercials you see is fake. Say a fashion company wants to do a photo shoot with a bunch of babes. Some creative director will scream at a bunch of people with MFAs to sketch out a concept for the backdrop. That concept gets given to a set-design company, who in New York, will potentially give it to a responsible skateboarder who they employ, who then, delegates work out to a team of maybe less-responsible-but-still-responsible-enough skateboarders to build out and deliver to the client.

Chances are, when you flip through some magazine and see a Victoria’s Secret or Ralph Lauren ad, the entire background was built by skateboarders you see in videos on the internet. See, it ain’t only Olson and Rieder — skaters come into fashion on all levels fam.

quarter

Photo via Dave Dowd

After years of hearing about this industry that employs at least a few people in every skate crew throughout the city (“can’t skate for three weeks, I’m on a job”), it made sense to shine a light on it. We asked Lurker Lou, a decade-plus-long set-builder / C.E.O. of Iron Claw Skates, Fred Gall, a freelance refugee in the set-building industry / Governor of New Jersey, and Paul Coots, a project manager at Ready Set who’s been able to help many skaters keep money in their pocket — about why the hell every skater works for a set-design company.