On Skateboarding As Sport As Stupid — The 2017 Dime Glory Challenge

September 15th, 2017 | 2:46 pm | Features & Interviews | 11 Comments

Words & Photos by Zach Baker

As the cloud of loud begins to dissipate from the stimulation of last week’s festivities up in Montreal, it is time to reflect. Tony Soprano once said, “I feel like King Midas in reverse, everything I touch turns to shit.” Since their inception, the Dime boys have proven to be a bunch of full-blown regular ass speed King Midases. There has not been a single public offering — be it a bowling montage, full-length skate video, a collab baby, or any of the annual skateboarding competitions to which they’ve played host the past three years — that has not gone off without a hitch. But this year’s Glory Challenge, with the newfound aide of DC Shoes, was more frivolous than anyone anticipated. DC, recently reclaimed by one of its original co-founders, weighed in hard with their trademark mountain of money, bringing the spectacle to a new echelon. We’re talking renting Wade D. a Ferrari and a helicopter for an Instagram post, a pyrotechnics exhibition that was described as “a buffet of fire,” renting ten limos to go bowling, and throwing a carnival-esque block party DJed by Darude that felt like a billionaire kid’s freakin’ quinciñera. These and every other tiny, speed shade-tinted detail amount to, from where I’m standing, the most expensive joke ever.

This long weekend of overstimulation has left us still unpacking all that happened. So these guys went out, invested all this effort, capital, manpower, organization…for…a joke? It took these boys the better part of a year to plan. Bryan worked tirelessly for weeks on end to construct the many rooms and modifiable obstacles of this year’s Glory Challenge. Legends like Tiago, Biebel, Kalis and Forrest Edwards were flown from the extremes of the continent to be in attendance…for a weekend of laughs? Listen — I’m no Miscavage, I don’t have all the answers — but the spectacle has left thousands of people at once psyched, inspired, shocked, and confused.

Idk This East Coast Lingo — Quotes Over the Years Vol. 4

September 12th, 2017 | 12:10 pm | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

Double the garbage in 2k17!

Quartersnacks turns twelve today. As with every passing year that we manage to keep the depository of nerdy shit about skateboarding and inside jokes almost nobody gets — we’d like to thank everyone who visits the website, supports it in any way, shows us around their city when we travel abroad, and spreads the word about what we have going on here. Thanks, it really means a lot ♥

And as with every passing two years, we have a compilation of quotes collected from the QS extended family. The majority of the content that appears on this website is nothing more than a long-winded shittalking session in written form, but these are the bits that didn’t have enough legs to be expanded into long-windedness ;)

Previously: Sick of Rich Girls, Boyz Will B Boyz, Volume 1

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Sexually Active Young Lady: “I’m not sure, I might’ve only fucked him because his bio said ‘free spirit.’”
Tron Jenkins: “Don’t be mad at him because he went to college.”

“That kid scoots like a Polar skater.” — Keith Denley

“Do you think Johnny’s complete disregard for anyone’s feelings is the real source of MPC’s productivity?” — Nick Boserio

“Girls here are mad weird. I just matched with a girl whose bio says ‘Hitler’s Dreamgirl.’” — Antonio Durao re: Tinder in Chicago

“All my ideas suck.” — Nick Nunez

“Seeing clips of Justin Bieber skating makes me want to start skateboarding again.” — Thando

“There are times when I’m too drunk to remember my parents’ names but I’ll never forget 2 Chainz’ verse on ‘Mud Musik.’” — Shrimp C

“Lets get some cookies or something.” — Hjalte Halberg

Kuz: “Just give me the word, I’ll quit my job and break up with my girlfriend.”
Inquisitive Gentleman: “You have a girlfriend?”
Kuz: “No, but if I did, I’d break up with her.”

Skateboarding & Color Coordination — A Retrospective

September 6th, 2017 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

A #NYFW Special Report

Words & Interviews by Frozen in Carbonite
Photo Collages by Requiem For A Screen

Skating writ large prides itself on a “no rules, bro!” ethos. #Menswear, an entity with which skating has become increasingly intertwined of late (via Vogue Skateboarding Magazine, etc.), has all kinds of rules. No black belt with brown shoes. No wearing white after Labor Day. One’s tie can’t go past one’s belt. Skating has no such faux pas — except for MAYBE brand-mixing — i.e. one can’t wear a Venture shirt if one is skating Indys or Vans socks if you’re wearing Nikes.

But what if I told you that skaters have curated their own sartorial code for decades — painstakingly color-coordinating their shoes, shirts, hats, and even spots? However, the modern-day thrift store aesthetic has left color-coordination by the wayside, even as color-blocking seemed to make a comeback last year, or some shit. So, in conjunction with New York Fashion Week, enjoy this retrospective of color coordination while you’re waiting to get into the Wang party or whatever.

Five Favorite Parts With The Chrome Ball Incident

August 16th, 2017 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 4 Comments

The latest faves come from one of the eminent scholars of our craft. As he has mainly trafficked in still images, we asked him for five picks from the history of skate videos. (We’ll get a pro on the next one, but the non-pro streak has been pretty fun.)

Chops even offered a quick intro, so the rest of the words are his :)

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Big ups to bro-cam, uncleared music, lens rings, slam sections, “acting”, background yelling (preferably in slow motion), self-celebratory rollaways, camera lights, hard copies, dubbed copies, BGPs, pissed-off security guards, random lurkers, supersonic skatecamps and unnecessarily long manual clips.

This list is dedicated to Gonz’s Video Days, Natas’ Fires, Guy’s Mouse, MC’s Questionable, Ricky’s EE3, Henry’s Lies and Heath’s Unseen Sight. Some things, like orgasms and pizza, are past the need of further recommendation.

An Interview With John Gardner

August 10th, 2017 | 2:51 pm | Features & Interviews | No Comments

Photo by Andy Enos

Intro & Interview by Zach Baker

A dope thing about skateboarding is that it attracts an endless variety of people, who are each drawn to it for their own specific reasons. We all have our unique relationships within skateboarding as far as what we want to do, who we want to be around, and where we want to go on, with, or because of them.

John Gardner’s motivations on a skateboard are not so easily pigeon-holed, though it can be said that he’s not adhering to any sort of trends in attire, trick selection, or really, well anything. It makes one wonder whether he even needs a skateboard. Like, if the skateboard were never invented, I feel like John Gardner would figure out some other vehicle to sate his physical and creative urges. This points to part of what makes him such a delight to watch. For some people, skateboarding is what creates their identity. But for John, the skateboard is just an accessory, one of many mediums lending themselves to his way of life and creative pursuits. Without the board, he’d be no less extraordinary, but as skateboarders, we couldn’t be more fortunate to have him as a member of the club.

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To start…the video part. It was just a pleasure to watch. Give me a little overview.

I had a bunch of VX footage that was just kind of sitting around, and I had always wanted to make music for a video part but never really had an opportunity to do so, so I immediately connected the dots and thought that this would be a great opportunity to make that happen. It’s over the course of two-and-a-half years, whenever a VX came out. Some of those clips might even be three of four years old. A lot of it is in California with some Jersey sprinkled in between.

Tell me about the soundtrack.

My friend Max Hersteiner, who I used to live with, is in an amazing band called Dirty Fences — he’s in a couple bands actually, Dirty Fences and Metal Leg. He and the bassist of Dirty Fences and Metal Leg, Max Komaski, all created music together for various video projects that I’ve made, so I hit those dudes up immediately to just jam and see what we came up with. Max’s friend Danny Cooper played guitar for the soundtrack. We just set up a camera, experimented and that’s what we came up with.

What’s up with your uncle?

My uncle is a wild man. He is my uncle Semo, my dad’s brother. He has a lot of upper body strength and is really good at doing handstands. He would walk up and down stairs on his hands when he was younger, so he naturally gravitated to riding a skateboard on his hands. I had a camera and wanted him to be in this little video that I was making, so we drove around looking for a little hill and filmed him doing his thing and that’s what I got. He loves skateboarding and he really tries but he skates better on his hands than I would say he skates on his feet.