Five Favorite Parts With Hjalte Halberg

July 16th, 2015 | 5:02 am | Features & Interviews | 6 Comments

hjalte schiffer

Chilling with Schiffer.

Keeping the series international for now. The latest installment comes from the reigning titleholder for Quartersnacks Noseslider of the Year — who in all honesty, stands the chance of two-peating even against some tough competition.

Jiro Dreams of Kickflips: How Japan Mastered One of America’s Greatest Inventions

July 8th, 2015 | 5:25 am | Features & Interviews | 22 Comments

jiro dreams of kickflips

*****Help Kev get a new knee*****

Japan is rife with vivid recreations of American culture. A pair of Levi’s from the 1940s, a burger spot from the 1950s, a jazz bar from the 1960s — each one’s history is studied in excruciating detail before the Japanese begin creating their own, oftentimes superior version of these quintessentially American things. It should come as no surprise that they are masters of another top-ten American invention: the kickflip.

American kickflips are for the mass market. Sure, there’s Reider up Fish Gap, Westgate over the bump-to-bar or Cyrus 1Oak over the garbage, but most of the time, they’re flipped and thrown in a pile. Our culture is in a constant state of making things faster, bigger, louder, though not necessarily better. First we had big flips, now we have bigger flips. Not better flips, they’re just bigger with more spins. We come from a place of deluxe editions and super sizes, so why not a hardflip revert late flip or a 900 shove-it? Mastering a classic is boring; let’s add a 270 to it.

We are failing to elevate Mr. Mullen’s seminal invention. It is stagnating in the country of its birth.

An Interview With Bryan From Dime

June 17th, 2015 | 6:24 am | Features & Interviews | 30 Comments

bryan-1

There are many unsung heroes in skateboarding. Local legends who never made it outside of their towns, skatepark builders who cede individual credit for the greater good, rogue bartenders who turn a blind eye to underage drinking at #skate #events are among them. But there’s one member of the skateboard family who truly never receives any credit: the warehouse guy. Where would Nyjah Houston be if not for the guy who physically takes his skateboards and Monster Energy memorabilia, and ships the box to him? Looking for a plank to drill eight holes into?

To give a glimpse of the skateboard-brand stock world, we hit up our Canadian friends at Dime, so they could grant us access to their always reliable and always smiling warehouse manager, Bryan.

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Tell us a bit about yourself Bryan. Where are you from? What was your upbringing like?

Hi, my name is Bryan. As Dime’s warehouse manager, I am a vital part of their supply chain process. I manage people, systems and make sure productivity targets are met. My goal is to make our customers happy. I love going out of my way to please strangers! I grew up in a small town called Kitchener, in Ontario, on a farm, as the only son of two very loving parents. My parents raised me to be a productive & happy person.

Did you always have a passion for stock? When did you first fall in love with packing boxes?

Growing up on a farm, I was always surrounded by little animals — cats, dogs, little chickens, & other meat products. Putting them in boxes really was a great source of pleasure for a young packer. Later, my love of packing evolved into packing more important things.

I believe the experience your customer receives when they order product from you should be flawless. If they ordered a size medium Dime Classic Tee, they should receive a medium size Dime Classic Tee. That is why I have developed the Dime Packaging Best Practices guide, as a tool that my team and I use to establish consistent packaging standards. By following these practices, I minimize cost and prevent delays, errors and damages. Failure to follow carton weight, size, or corrugated requirements could result in lost or damaged merchandise, delays, or additional charges and we’re not having any of that bullshit at Dime.

When did you move to Montreal? How did you come to work at Dime?

It was 2014, I was at a point in my life where I had to make some changes. Kitchener, being the hate crime capital of Canada, was a really negative environment and it forced me to make a choice. I moved to Montreal with my friend Jim, with hopes of a new beginning. We found our answer in the church [of Scientology]. I cannot overstate the value of Scientology’s teachings. We met the Dime guys at a “Cause of Suppression” class. They gave us a chance and hooked us up with entry level warehouse jobs at Dime. Through hard work and dedication, I climbed the corporate ladder and landed the warehouse manager position. Unfortunately, I had to fire Jim due to his alcoholism.

Five Favorite Parts With Danny Brady

June 12th, 2015 | 5:05 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

brady back tail

Photo via Hit You Off Management

Figure it’s been a while since we did one of these with a non-American. Here you go.

An Interview With Jason Byoun + Remix Contest

June 3rd, 2015 | 10:52 am | Features & Interviews | 24 Comments

jason grab by colin

Photo via Colin Sussingham

The most experimental, controversial, subversive, and Vine-friendly skateboarder working in New York City today. Interview by Jesse Alba and Genesis Evans. Scroll to the bottom for details on the re-edit contest.

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Where are you from and what’s your favorite board company of all time?

I’m from Monteville, New Jersey, which is near Parsippany and Towaco, and my favorite board company is Creature.

What nationality are you?

American.

But what about ethnic background?

Korean. 100%.

How did you start skating?

My friend Lynden from New Jersey got me into skating. He had a Popwar board, with Phantom Two trucks, orange Spitfire wheels and riser pads. We were chilling in my basement and he had to take a shit. My basement is carpeted, so I stood up on his board and learned how to ollie in the time it took him to take a shit. Then I got on CCS and ordered a board.

When I was learning how to ollie, my cousin told me that Stevie Williams learned to ollie on his second try.

In my first week of skating, everyone I grew up with told me it took them years to learn tricks. I was just like “Nah, first week, I’m gonna learn how to kickflip,” just so I could call them and tell them I did it.

Where did you skate in New Jersey?

I grew up skating in a town where the main spot was a basketball court and rec center, sort of like Tompkins. It was outside, but in the wintertime, they’d put an air bubble over it. My mom had a mini van and we’d put a box and a Zero flatbar in it to bring over there.

How about Chris Cole leaving Zero for Plan B?

I haven’t been keeping up with that to be honest. Chris Cole was actually my first favorite skater. Ryan Sheckler and Chris Cole.

Who are your favorite skaters now?

Paul Rodriguez, Phil Rodriguez, Brian Tober, Adam Zhu and Nate Rojas.