Which Celebrity Allegedly Got Bit in the Face Outside of Max Fish?

Classic” • Photo via Nik Stain

Another addition to the “wish this was 4x as long”-pile: just under a minute of Kevin Bradley and Alice Coltrane, via Johnny Wilson.

“For this reason, any alternative headspace that can be conjured by a Palestinian, is a radical form of resistance.” Medium has a photo feature and article about the growing skate scene in Palestine.

The Poetic Collective video is online in full. Wtf is Poetic Collective? Funny you should ask

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R.I.P. Fall ’19 — We Barley Knew You

Spread via @geometricskateshop on IG

Quartersnacks for Spitfire Wheels arrives in stores today. We will not be carrying this in our webstore, but have a lot of fab regs QS stuff in there if you’re trying to support. Any shop with a Deluxe account near you should be a safe bet though ♥ (And for anyone asking, yes there are both hard wheels and cruiser: hard wheel is Formula Four 53mm 99du, and soft wheel is 54mm 80du.)

“We did crime to fund it basically.” File this one under: Had no idea how much I would love this interview when I first started skimming it. You’re probably familiar with @muckmouth the Instagram page, you might be familiar with Muckmouth the website, but you probably aren’t familiar with Muckmouth the Auckland-based skate magazine. Free has an incredible interview with Muckmouth founder, Alex Dyer, about his journey through three generations of skateboard media that is full of stories to make you laugh and sit at the edge of your seat. “Where the fuck is Callum?”

Skating to one of the ten best songs ever recorded by humans is bold, but whatever, the world is gonna end soon anyway ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Justin Grzechowiak’s part in the Buffalo, New York-based Remedy video is a good time.

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MTLiens

The Dime Live @ Stadium highlight they DON’T want you to see! (Jk, they def want you to see it. Holy shit.) And obvs a late Monday round-up after returning from Montreal is practically a QS office tradition. Sorry for the delay.

Next Video is a full-length from Andrew Kennelly AKA @Dudesarecool5, filmed pretty much entirely in the city (minus the obligatory “Cali section.”) New Kyota part + plus a bunch of people you’ll recognize from skating around downtown…or Borough Hall. Village Psychic has a quick highlight reel of GIFs.

Just before Jake Phelps died, Zered recorded what would be the final interview on Thrasher radio with him as the host. They put the 30-minute conversation online last week.

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QS x Savage x Fenty

Sign + share the petition to keep synthetic turf off the Tompkins flat.

Not a ton of New York news this past week…

4 Cities, 100 Nuggets” is a mini video featuring some Canadian dudes (…I think?) doing a two-week road trip through North Carolina, Philly, New York, and Boston. That back noseblunt bigspin at Baldi really came out of left field + good to see people coming up victorious over the speed bumps at the recently-knobbed plaza on 110th and 8th (which is sure to be utilized by absolutely nobody now, considering it’s in the middle of the street, with no shade, and across from a 840-acre park full of trees…)

Thoroughly enjoyed this… a lot: Kris Brown in the Philadelphia-based, A Regular Ass Video by DJ Traceman.

“It’s not a boot-camp for the Olympics.” “No, it’s a boot-camp for life.” Given the stature of its alumni, you likely know of its existence, but you probably don’t know much about the skateboarding high school in Mälmo, Sweden. Skateism has a full interview about Bryggeriet, and how’s its not exactly what you would expect.

Brian Delaney and a few others skate some Boston classics in a collab clip between Grand and Orchard Skate Shop. (Is that the first time somebody has backside 360 kickflipped a trashcan on flat?)

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Skateboarding Is Officially Old Enough To ‘Play The Classics’

In 2006, rap came of a certain age. It was the ten-year anniversary of Jay-Z’s first album, and he celebrated it by performing the entire thing in a highly publicized Radio City Music Hall show. Rap had enough longevity and had resisted enough fads to reach a level where some of its best acts never had to record a new song again — and they’d still be able to sell out venues for the remainder of their careers. (Fwiw, Jay was “retired” at this moment.) Our culture already accepted this from the Stevie Wonders, Aretha Franklins and Billy Joels, but it was around this point that hip-hop made the turn. Jay, Kanye and Wayne can call it quits on making new music today, and still pull a Barclays Center crowd in 2039 by giving the people what they want.

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