End of the Month / Seasonal Depression Links

This forecast is absolute murder. The ghost of winter 2010-2011 is definitely going to leave many reminders in our springtime recovery efforts, as well.

Japanese MTV ran a New York sightseeing bit on Supreme back in 1996. It’s a time warp into what skating seems to have looked like fifteen years ago: World Industries boards still up on the wall, a copy of Mouse in the video display, bulky-ass skate shoes, Triple Five Soul being down Lafayette Street (That actually lasted much longer than 1996, but unless you were trying to keep swooshy cargo pants or army green bucket hats with stash pockets alive, that probably had little bearing on your existence), and Nas in his Raekwon-envying, confused, chipped tooth era.

Assuming you’re like most people who skateboard and check Crailtap regularly, you have already seen this. In case you missed it, the latest Mini DV Drawer features the B-roll version of Mike Carroll’s masterwork of a downtown Los Angeles line from Fully Flared. I wonder what the original fakie flip inclusive rendition was, before it got switched to the switch frontside 180 / backside flip combo.

Although this website has never really been on some naïve message board nonsense by dwelling too hard (or at all) on skateboarding’s duo of most visible representatives (aside from occasionally complimenting Ryan on his New York based skate tricks)… Sheckler and Dyrdek are really fucking these kids up by endorsing something called “Bill My Parents.”

Some late-90s New Jersey footage from Robert Brink over at Already Been Done. It’s an over four-year-old upload, but it’s new to me. Features some raw Tim O’Connor and Pancho Moler footage, plus shots of the beloved Hoboken Ledges.

The Chrome Ball Crack Rock Incident presents the Hubba Hideout photo collective.

A token Norwegian has done his best in channeling one of the more difficult endeavors in Southern California schoolyard bank skating, by skating the parallel six-stair rails at the brick section of Columbia from the actual incline. Well done.

There are some new ledges in Boston, they look beveled, but the good ground would probably make up for that. Hopefully the snow covering the northeast right now thaws out by July.

Howard Glover has uploaded the Brooklyn section of his Pre-2K video onto Vimeo. Half of the four minutes is set at the best spot to ever reside on Kings County soil. Billy Rohan insists that the Parks Department stores all of the marble they remove from renovations in some warehouse, i.e. it never simply gets thrown out. We should write up a letter telling them to keep their skate parks, and just install a few skate friendly plazas throughout the city with already-skated-on marble.

They have security guards watching that stupid wall on Bowery & Houston now. Art game is intense, bro.

Quote of the Week:Tanqueray is like drinking a Christmas.” — Ben Nazario

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Winter Refuge: Below the Bridge Skatepark

It snowed again. With one more inch, we’re en route to having one of the snowiest Januarys on record.

Although mentioned in previous posts, we have had a few chances to actually skate the Below the Bridge Skatepark in Bayonne over the past several weeks, as it has been the only real source of non-weather dependent terrain, aside from maybe a fun box in an office. The park isn’t that big, but they maximized on what space they had. The normal protocol here has been that the people who only skate ledges stick to the left side of the park, and everyone else skating the stairs, bowl-half and euro gaps stick to the right side. It does tend to get crowded in the evenings, but is pretty much clear at any time you expect kids to be in school, and weekday nights have never been too much of a hassle in terms of overcrowding.

The ledge is really solid. If it was in Brooklyn or Tribeca on decent ground, it’d be one of the best ledges in the city, so you’re not really settling for merely a box with some Home Depot angle iron glued on. There’s not much here in the realm of transition beyond the half of a bowl, which some kids treat as a mini ramp, and a three-foot-high quarter pipe at the top of the stair platform. (There has been talk about building a bowl or a mini ramp in the space next door though.)

The park has already been responsible for some new Zipcar accounts, so it’s definitely worth venturing out to a few times over the winter. They have three sessions: 12-3 P.M., 3-6 P.M., and 6-9 P.M. (There actually might be a 9-12 on Fridays and Saturdays.) Each session is $15. Located at 9 Gertrude Street in Bayonne. (Ten to fifteen minutes via Holland Tunnel when there’s no traffic. 25-minute to three-hour drive when there is traffic.)

Both of the pictures are enlargeable. Yes, there’s a weird ghosting thing because they were taken with a cell phone and not a real camera. I was gonna post some footage of Andre Page doing ollies onto absurd things, but there might actually be a half-indoor winter clip on the horizon to relay the largely undocumented face of New York skateboarding in the wintertime.

From Seattle to Pink Houses

Have you seen the forecast for Tuesday night into Wednesday yet? Seven to twelve inches overall. Should be fun.

Film Me, the summer 2010 video that came before Goin’ Ham’ from the same crew, is available in its full forty-minute form on Vimeo.

Some real nineties-looking footage. The video says it’s from 1993-1994, or “around the time when people started skating switch.” You can see the barren asphalt wasteland that Battery Park City was prior to the completion of construction some years later, The Humps (or at least the spot I think was The Humps), and the nineties version of Midtown.

The final update from the Autumn Bowl. It’s been a wrap for a minute now, but just in case you wanted visual proof of its final state. Here’s a clip from the final two days as well. But according to Forrest Edwards, “It’s not like you get paid a million dollars to skate transition.”

This Keith Hufnagel-channeling clip of Zach Moore is about a year old, but a solid watch largely due to to the speed with which he skates through things.

Mama’s Boys is an upcoming local video that has a Loose Trucks Max part, you can watch the promo here, and a few New York-set throwaway clips here.

The nollie off the hip to boardslide down the rail in Pat Gallaher and Jack Olson’s shared part in the Flow Trash video is pretty official.

As a follow up to our new street plazas post from November…there’s a new street gap on Maiden Lane down the hill from C.I.A. (foot and a half high ledge over seven or eight feet of sidewalk into the street), and the new Grace Ledge is black marble, over four stairs, and lower (although still closed off for construction.)

Quote of the Week:Yo Dre, what are you doing?” — Inquisitive Gentleman
I have been sitting here watching the ‘Ride’ video for hours and don’t feel like I have wasted a second of my day.” — Andre Page

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All White Everything

Thunder, lighting and snow, that’s a first for this lifetime. There’s even snow inside the train stations right now. If you happen to be blessed enough to not have work today, don’t go outside. Sit home and listen to the Can’t Ban the Snowman tape or something. Here are some links to pass the time for this Monday morning.

With board graphics getting all of the retrospectives, and printed-word love these days, wheel graphics are pretty much universally neglected. Here’s a quick guide as to when skate wheel art began, and ceased to, matter.

The Quartersnacks Varsity Jacket via Bowery Stadium.

Someone asked Ian Reid if he could name “25 skateboarders who are actually from New York” on his Tumblr some time back. He returned with a very comprehensive answer.

Anthony Claravall offers some anecdotal nostalgia about the Cardona brothers, and what it was like filming their 411 “Wheels of Fortune” segment sixteen years ago.

You know things are slow down in Yahoo News International Headquarters when they can write five hundred words about the city installing fences and “No Skateboarding” signs at the Chinatown Banks. They quote Two Hawks Young though, which is sick. For those who don’t know, he was a crucial part to the greatest conceptual skateboard video of all time.

Anthony Beckner threw together the first batch of footage from the Below the Bridge Skatepark with the Classic Skate Shop crew. Conveniently enough, the park opens today, but even driving to Bayonne might be a bit too ambitious of an endeavor right now. The park looks slightly smaller than expected, and unfortunately doesn’t have the two different sections of street courses like Drop-In does (real estate, I know), but it would still be a good call for an off-hours winter session. Just maybe wait for the kids to get back to school.

While you complain on the internet, Roctakon is a humanitarian who supports Dominican skateboarders.

Rob Harris’ “Aussie Pressure” clip. The ending is brilliant.

Blueprint Skateboards’ “Summer in New York” digi-cam clip. Aside from the ground, this spot is the worst.

Thanks to everyone who linked up the Christmas clip: 48 Blocks, NY Skateboarding, Mound City, Paulgar, Second Nature, Blogge Materiale, Senes 23, Olson Stuff, Ian Coughlan, Krook Life, Skate the Streets, Tim Nolan, High Five Skateshop, Strictly Skateboarding, Max White, Delta Co. You guys are the best.

Quote of the Week:I’m going to buy a bottle of Jack and drink it until I no longer care that I suck at skating.” — Miles Marquez

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An indoor skatepark twelve miles from Manhattan

Falling in line with Quartersnacks’ “Exception when it’s about Jersey” policy, we’re going to take some time to veer off and discuss an indoor skatepark. An important one. Even if you’re, like, the “street-est” dude out, by living in New York, your existence succumbs to one of three options in the wintertime: 1. You have a lot of money, resources, a mistress, etc. that enables a living situation in a warm(er) climate like Miami, Los Angeles, or Barcelona (yes, obviously it’s not summer there, but still.) 2. You put your skateboard in a corner, spend the next three months hibernating, and vicariously experience skateboarding on the internet. 3. You rent/borrow/own a car and go to Drop-In.

Not that there is anything wrong with Drop-In (They released a Jersey Dave “Bro Model” skateboard a few years back, so you sound like an idiot if you have anything negative to say about their institution), but it’s 40 miles away from Manhattan. And speaking from experience, that’s 40 miles worth of chances for Switch Mike to almost crash into a highway divider upon realizing he’s in the wrong lane at the start of a blizzard.

After a year or so of rumors hinting at a concrete, indoor skatepark in Bayonne, Below The Bridge Skatepark, located on 9 Gertrude Street under the Bayonne Bridge is scheduled to open on December 27th. (Source: The park’s Facebook page.) That’s twelve miles from Manhattan via the Holland Tunnel, or just over the Bayonne Bridge if you’re coming from Brooklyn or Queens, as you can cut through Staten Island over the Verrazano Bridge. Based off the park’s Facebook, helmets are required for those under eighteen, but there is no specific information on cost, hours, or things of that sort.

The park is part wood, part concrete, with a Berrics-esque design plus half of a mini-bowl. It’ll probably be packed beyond breathability in the first few opening weeks, but will hopefully mellow out once the real hand of winter sets in mid-January. In the end, it’s a indoor park twelve miles from the city, and while it will have no bearing on your life from April to November, it’s definitely a good thing that it came to fruition this early into the winter.

Check for more pictures after the jump.

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