An Emblematic Document of Our Socially Distant Times: ‘COVIDEO-19’

It is the oldest joke ever told — older than the one about martinis and boobs, or the one about American healthcare.

“How many skateboarders does it take to screw in a lightbulb?”

Ha ha ha! “One to do it, one to film it, and another ten to say ‘Yeahhh!'” Ha ha ha!

But what about during a global pandemic? Suddenly, in the era of social distancing, those ten friends plus filmer cease to be C.D.C-compliant.

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Board’s In The Ocean, G!

Cafe Pick Me Up

Mega relevant to a certain segment of our readers and anyone who has appeared in a B.S.A. Boys video: the northern zone of McCarren Park adjacent to the bathrooms, known to many as “The Couch,” is slated to be renovated into a restaurant next year.

Marcus Pulvermacher made a fourteen-minute edit from summer 2019 that includes a ton of bro cam clips of Genny and Caleb. Fun vibe to start a 55-degree Monday in February…

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Day Poker

We really blew it on missing this one in the 2017 color coordination piece. Iconic tho.

Here’s an eight-minute recap of the Hardies event at Blue Park this past Friday, which includes the best angle of Tyshawn’s kickflip over the table longways thus far.

The Man Who Films spent a lot of time in Rockaway this past summer and made a fifteen-minute video entitled “Beach Genius.” Everyone knows that Rockaway isn’t the most abundant part of the city for spots, so shout out to those guys for managing to avoid all the skateparks in all but one clip. Includes a mini Phil Rodriguez section where he somehow turns one of those blue bus shelters into an actual bank. And it’s also perhaps the first time in human history that there’s been a transition from Nicki Minaj to …MF Doom. Good vibe the whole way through, and the right amount of ~different~ ♥

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Club Life Vol. 4 In Stores Now

free the nipple

#freethenipple

These Magenta parodies are a burgeoning sub-genre of Vine humor.

Colin Sussingham, who photographed many of the hottest moves in Beef Patty, Paych and Horny, tells the story behind a bunch of his favorite photos for Monster Children.

Helas is the Lordz of the 2010s #TDGAFAU

Solid New York montage from the Mood NYC crew and The Man Who Films.

ICYMI: Lurk NYC is back with Volume 10 of the “New York Times” outtakes series, and Jenkem dropped a ten-minute video featurette on the making of Polar and Converse’s “Manhattan Days” video from last year.

Ron Deily and Gavin Nolan with a cold sesh at the 181st Street park this past winter.

They’re trying to build a five-story cement skatepark in Folkestone, England.

Action Bronson’s part from Life is Goodie.

“[Alien Workshop] was dying when we were making Mindfield.” — A.V.E.

Mark Gonzales uploaded a six-minute video of Jake Johnson trying switch flip backside lipslides down Black Hubba in slow motion. Is it art? It must be art.

Standard issue New York iPhone montage with a lot of L.E.S. and Columbus Park footage, which advances the sad reality that Columbus Park may now be the most popular street spot in lower Manhattan, if not Manhattan altogether. Aubrey Graham on #musicsupervision to help you cry through it :'(

Always weird to remember that people actually sometimes maybe kinda sorta read the words that are written on this website.

Late on all of this, but…got sucked into a Google wormhole of reading about ghost cities in China — urban developments intended for millions of people that ended up containing maybe ~2% of that projection. That naturally provoked the question of “why has no one done a skate trip here?” which then lead to a discovery of this two-year-old video. It’s the most eerily post-apocalyptic skate video ever.

No phrase was said more this past weekend than “It’s the Zoo York.” Film yourself listening to the video below on loop for ten hours to win a gift box from Bronze and an Uber gift certificate from Quartersnacks. Tika tika tika tika tika

A video posted by Peter Sidlauskas (@solojazz) on

Is this rail skateable if you hold the Starbucks doors open? It’s new.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: 6′ 3 / 190 pound Steph Curry boxes out 7′ / 270 pound Dwight Howard.

Quote of the Week: “The West Village is the new East Village.” — E.J

Small drop of new summer merch available in the webstore Monday, June 1. 12 A.M.

An Interview With Philly Santosuosso

philly wallride

Photo by G. Dagostaro

Most people do not know much about skateboarding in New Orleans. You can walk down a major city’s downtown anywhere in America and bet on seeing at least a few skateable things. When you walk around downtown New Orleans, where the few tall buildings are, and there’s next to nothing. (Places like that make me feel bad about writing things like this, even as a joke.) Its first public skatepark has been entangled in red tape for years. Its most recognizable skater might be Lil’ Wayne.

Philly and Humidity have been our lens into New Orleans’ underreported skate scene for years now, a city that manages to make something out of not very much.

+++++++

Not many people think of New Orleans as a skate city. How did you first get into skating down there?

My half brother got into skating when I was eight or nine, then quit, and I kept going. There was a small indoor park called Second Nature, which was run by the best skaters in the city. I hung out there, and they had a skate shop that you could rent skate videos from. I would watch a lot of 411s, video after video, and that exposed me to what was going on in skating. I ended up riding for the shop inside the park when I got a little older.

What was the scene like at that time? It feels like it never gets much coverage.

Duane Pitre is from here, and was riding for Alien Workshop around that time. The first actual skateboard I bought was off his grandma, who owned poodle grooming shop where she also sold his boards. Dyrdek would come down — when Dyrdek ollies over a shopping cart off a little bump in Mind Field in one of his little clips from when he was younger — that’s actually in New Orleans. Sal Barbier is also from here, so there was a good community of skateboarders at that time when I was first starting to skate.

I didn’t even know New Orleans sucked for skating until later.

Filmed by Thom Musso / The Man Who Films

Why do you say you realized it sucked?

First, the park closed down. Then, the first Zero video came out, which was sick, but really bummed me out on skating. I saw that everything was about jumping down shit. In New Orleans, we have like one eight-stair and couldn’t really follow in that direction. I was young, so I got a bit more into BMX instead, building dirt jumps and shit, being a kid, you know?

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