Best Bloody in Brickell

Added Thrasher‘s “The Union Square Video” — from San Francisco’s Union Square, naturally — to the Quartersnacks One-Spot Part Map, which turns one this coming July! We started out with 46 parts filmed exclusively at one spot, and have quickly worked our way to two shy of 80, with at least one on every continent except Antarctica 🥶 Wonder what it’d take to film a video exclusively at New York’s Union Square though (slated to be renovated soon, too.)

Be sure to stop by and support Skate Like A Girl’s 4th annual “Get On Board” silent auction fundraiser.

Anybody who has pulled up to the Kosciuszko Bridge spot (the new home of all the Blue Park obstacles) has asked, “Wait… is this a skatepark or..?” Jenkem got the full backstory on how it got built and why it differs from other skateparks in New York. Still didn’t answer why they used round coping 😡

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Shoutout Pluto

Photo by Greg Navarro

It is impossible to overstate what a joy it is to watch John Gardner’s “Shoutout Earth” raw files. From the close calls, to the spot selection, to his general ability to use his superpowers to do the type of shit that only Jawn Gardner could do — raw files get dropped out of a literal waterfall these days, but this one is a special watch ❤️ (John’s QS interview from 2017 is still a favorite.)

Love a homie video that ends with a …bar fight :) Rock Bottom II by Reilly Schlitt is a very fun watch. Entirely filmed in New York, heavy on the downtown Brooklyn spots, smiles all around.

Andrew Reynolds spoke to Village Psychic about the politics of having a signature trick.

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Fool’s Spring

Adrian Vega via Giovanni Reda. This photo really does justice to how gnar tricks on this bank are.

Zach Moore (director of last summer’s remix blockbuster, “Jake Johnson: The Movie“) is front-running for delivering 2021’s best laughs so far. A)The Ultimate Skate Songs Collection” envisions skate videos’ most iconic music in the format of a late-night TV commercial for a CD box set. The plot twist in this one is so brilliant. B)A Caption To Die For” pays tribute to Thrasher‘s often absurd video captions in the form of old-timey newspapermen by way of classic Hollywood film noir. Give Zach Moore his skate Oscar.

This likely got to you last week, but ICYMI, Cyrus was the latest guest on The Bunt.

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The Best Skate Video Parts of the 2010s — QS Reader Survey Results

Illustration by Cosme Studio

Back in October, we asked QS visitors to choose their favorite video parts of the 2010s. If civilization and skateboarding were to end today, which five parts would you bury in a weather-and-nuclear-proof time capsule for post-apocalyptic earth dwellers to reference when they rediscover skate culture of these past ten years?

QS prides itself as being a destination for people who think a lot about skateboarding. Rather than poll a few close colleagues for their favorites, we felt we had a wide enough reverberation in the skate nerd universe to try and crowdsource a canon of the 2010s from anyone willing to sit down and think about it. I can emphatically say that in reviewing the mountain of ballots, everyone took their votes seriously — save maybe the guy who voted for five Micky Papa parts.

As we tallied the results, consistent trends in the count were apparent. Any fears about a recency bias went out the window; there’s only one part from 2019, and the average year of the top 25 is 2014. QS obviously has its own breed of skate nerd audience — this poll would look different if taken by Thrasher or Free — but I would bet that their lists wouldn’t be TOO far off from this one.

Presented without comment for the top 25-11, and then via a lot of favors from writer friends on the internet for the top 10: here are the 25 best video parts of the past ten years.

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#LUXURYWATCH2019

Sometime during those drunk final ten days of 2018 when no e-mails went answered, an associate mentioned the difficulty of isolating “trends” as we approach the final year of the decade. In this era of post-everything where the past exists at the same time as the future, what even qualifies as a #trend? Gone are the simple days of noticing a sudden spike in camo-panted legs at Tompkins, or bleached heads doing no complies and being able to declare: “trend!” No, in recent years, the #trendwatch has leaned towards psychological states of being, and on occasion, fully fallen short of fruition. Even something as under-a-microscope as “BLESSED” is a more refined version of what the same cast had already been molding since 2014.

And then, the associate says [name redacted for fear of “YOU’RE WHAT’S WRONG WITH SKATEBOARDING!” retribution], “What if the 2019 Trend™ is simply skating in really expensive shit?”

This goes beyond Dill or Dylan being inspired by Prada shoes, or Pappalardo waiting for a flight with his Louis luggage. Obviously skateboarders have been documented with nice shit before, but now, you open Instagram and see Lucien Clarke and P-Rod posting photos of them in Louis Vuitton outerwear within an hour of one another. Further out in the Instagram universe, in a galaxy most-closely observed by those who list their favorite skaters by handles rather than government names, there is a burgeoning sect of volunteer teamriders for Gucci, Versace, and Burberry. At a cultural crossroad where Playboi Carti is one of Jay-Z’s biggest influences, there seem to be two choices across all spectrums: reenact a skate version of the intro from John Shanahan’s It’s Time part, or take advice from the other Jonah Hill sports movie, which is, of course, “adapt or die.”

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