Flying Cars

baker

Monday links on a Tuesday (again.) Photo via Gnarcotics on Instagram

“If everything is bigger in Texas, then every t-shirt is longer in Canada.” There goes our merchandise department’s plan for releasing front print Snackman shirts in tall tee sizes to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of Thug Motivation 101 next summer. (Might do it anyway, don’t worry. Fashion goes in cycles. Let’s get it…)

Whatever happened to the rasta skater? How has no one followed in Matt Field, Tosh, and Adelmo’s footsteps? New skate nerdery website, SMLTalk, speculates that the industry just got too fast-paced for that relic of the mid-2000’s stoned out #vibez.

Bronze affiliate, Dick Rizzo, has a cool “Mag Minute” over on the Skateboard Mag site, edited to one of only three classic summer songs by a New York rap artist released post-2003 A.K.A. when New York rap ceased being relevant/good.

Cue up two dozen kids with pomaded hair, highwaters and tucked in shirts trying double kickflips over the trash can at Tompkins this upcoming weekend.

Striking a pose after landing a hot move on a skateboard didn’t begin with Dylan Reider. In fact, it’s not even partial to sleek silloutted, fashion-forward skaters — hip-hop white guys might be the greatest practitioners of “afterbangs.” Kingpin rounded up twelve of the most notable after-trick poses in skate video history.

Boil the Ocean is creating a mixtape, in blog form of occasionally under-appreciated, breezy summertime video parts. Are we on the cusp of skateboarding as a whole rediscovering Second Hand Smoke? Akin to how the past few years seem like they’ve been influenced by people rewatching the old Stereo videos again?

Thanks Supra, always nice to sit through 1:20 of “lifestyle” for one Stevie trick and then another thirty seconds of links to your other videos.

“Do you regret doing the movie Grind?” “I could write a book on this question alone.” Always happy to see that C. Fro is doing well. Never forget caveman crook down Bricktown. Surprised “weird” skaters haven’t been quicker to adopt that one.

Wait, Habitat made shoes?

“What the fuck is that doing there? Who puts a garbage can on a rail?”

Quote of the Week: “Black people drinking Blue Moon just looks weird.” — Ty Lyons

Maybe not a “petition” per se, but we’re launching a Twitter campaign to try and convince O’Dell to get to work on a Muska Epicly Later’d. If you’re on Twitter, shoot him a message. Probably be nice about it though ;)

Great Moments in TV History: C. Fro on The Blame Game

The 1990s were filled with many unforgettable TV moments — the O.J. Simpson trial, Douglas V.S. Tyson, Bill Clinton’s “I did not have sexual relations with that woman” statement, Larry Johnson’s four-point play — but the archivists at the Skate.ly Library recently unearthed the most legendary one of all.

During the late-90s, before MTV became a reality show network, they had a dating show called The Blame Game in which ex-couples embarassed themselves for a chance to win a Cancun vacation. In this particular episode, C. Fro and his ex-boo explained the definition of a “pro ho” to mainstream America, explored human uses for bearing lubricant, related the heartbreak of being left for a pro snowboarder, and recounted their shared experiences of rave after-parties and wild nights of passion in San Diego.

If Rick Ross could be ousted as a former corrections officer and still maintain his status as one of rap’s most reliable summertime hit-makers, there is no reason why memories of bad MTV show appearances and a history of gargoyling should affect young C. Fro’s popularity in light of masterful recent video parts like this one.

Source: Skate.ly Library, easily one of the best skateboard sites on the internet

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Cash Only Popeye’s

Click to enlarge. The scan is from the extensive Gino Iannucci archive over at the Chrome Ball Incident. The other day, we were talking about how great it’d be if the Javitz Center was still around. New York could definitely use another empty park with a bunch of three-sets, some mellow ledges, and no bust factor.

Some people pointed out a few omissions from last Friday’s rap video skate part post, namely Quim Cardona from Eastern Exposure 3 (which wasn’t an actual part), Joey Suriel from Street Cinema (only an intro, but his choice of rapping over a Beanie Sigel and Rick Rock collaboration is quite admirable), and some obscure Dave Mayhew part mentioned in the comments. However, Dave Mayhew has already accomplished enough in skateboarding by reinventing the way mankind perceived footwear with the D3, and pre-dating Carroll’s popularization of doing impossibles out of things with his Storm part.

Also regarding the aforementioned article, the Black Ninja co-signed his inclusion. He is certainly the best rapper of the bunch, and at this point, probably the only skater who should be rapping to his part (although the bar is pretty high for his next outing.)

Did you know that Chad Fernandez has a twin brother who’s a UFC fighter? (Via Eby)

It’s no secret that the C-Benches are a D-list downtown spot (actually, there are no A-list downtown spots, so maybe that bumps it up to a C-list downtown spot), but on the slim chance that you have been itching to skate there, the whole plaza is under construction for now. It looks like they’re not touching the benches, and only replacing the floor, which would be a good thing. Unless it’s clunkier than the current floor.

Well, this was certainly expected.

Diamond Days #49. Word is that they’re going to do a special GOLD edition for #50 with a big Steve Berra 5050 like 411 did for their 50th edition. Features footage of Corey Rubin AKA Corey from Finland, and a very impressive maneuver on three-up three-down.

Quartersnacks International Links: Butter Goods promo out of Perth, Australia (that low metal ledge spot on perfect ground from Full Flared, etc. looks like the funnest place on earth), and a Familia Skateboards promo from South Africa. Always cool when people from all over the globe shoot over links to such a local, inside-joke-filled New York site.

Quote of the Week:
Yaje: “Does anyone want to buy a set of wheels?
12th & A Lurker: “I’d buy them if they were Rictas.

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Gang Starr, Skate Videos & the 90s

April 19th marks one year since Keith “Guru” Elam passed away. While there are plenty of sites to read about the impact of his music on a grand scale, the fact that Gang Starr probably occupies the upper tier of “Most Songs to Appear in Skate Videos Throughout the Nineties,” if you were to tally up individual artist appearances (at least as far as rap is concerned), will receive zero mention.

If you’re currently in your late-teens or early-twenties, you most likely began skating in a period bookended by Fulfill the Dream (1998) and Yeah Right (2003). In a time before the internet became a daily onslaught of new music, and you had to ration your money between skate videos and actually purchasing CDs (or scouring Limewire, Kazaa, or whatever spyware-infested file sharing service you chose to use back then), skate videos themselves provided a window to music / rap that wasn’t necessarily on BET, MTV, The Box, etc., or older songs that you were too young to have experienced when they were actually released. You didn’t necessarily have to be one of those kids who organized their first iPod by skate video title as opposed to album, but it’s hard to deny that videos played a much larger role in shaping music discovery ten-plus years ago than they do now, when everything is available. Without the internet, or the presence of an older, more knowledgeable sibling, skate videos introduced plenty of nine, ten, and eleven-year-olds in that period to rap that did not necessarily begin with shiny suit era Bad Boy and end at Jay-Z. (Although it is a shame that skate video soundtracks shunned the “Tunnel Banger” sub-genre at its height.)

One of those key moments was Steve Olson’s part in Fulfill the Dream, which introduced me, and a whole bunch of kids just like me, to Gang Starr, as our formative years of becoming pop culture / musically aware occurred in that four-year drought between Hard to Earn and Moment of Truth.

“Above the Clouds” came from what would be the last great Gang Starr record, but there was an extensive period preceding 1998, when the group’s music was in a whole grip of 411s and a slew of memorable company video parts as well.

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Who doesn’t love a redemption story with a happy ending?

C. Fro A.K.A. Hair A.K.A. Da ‘Nandez A.K.A. “The Most Hated Skater of All Time” A.K.A. “The Most Misunderstood Skater of All Time” A.K.A. Chad Fernandez, is, or appears to be, off “that Charlie Sheen” and all related pursuits in the year 2011. Since we are in fact, the media enterprise responsible for filming and releasing the infamous “I’M A GARGOYLE” video (Explanation of this event here, original post here, and our mandatory answer for a re-post request: no), it seems only right that we counter our previous involvement with Hair in a positive light.

There has not been anything more inspiring released in the first quarter of 2011 for those who succumbed to binge drinking, nightlife, and other vices throughout the winter. In L.A., weather has no bearing on when the scales of skateboarding and alcohol tip in favor of the latter, but the precedent of focus and lack of hungoverness still stands. If you have fallen victim to the trap of the party during this brutal winter, the best thing you can do for yourself is watch this video, and bask in the redemption. C. Fro has since abandoned his controversial pursuits at skating reconstructions of real spots (the Staples Center hubba he now conveniently treats like a bank…can you imagine the worst case scenarios involved with messing up a half cab flip into the middle of that thing?), but maintains his habit of frontside nosegrinding a bigger rail with each and every video part for his ender. There are more than a handful of sights in this year’s first memorable underdog sports film to incite a polite “no” the next time an associate texts you the phrase, “Yo come thru I got a bottle.”

When the “GARGOYLE” thing went down, Hair said, “I got the Grim Reaper knocking at my door, dude. I’m not gonna let him in.” After this part, we’re glad he kept the locks tight.