Like Glowstick, We Crack Then Shine

Antonio tomfoolery in the QS Dunk that is coming out pretty soon :) Photo by Jason Lecras

From a skate house above a chicken shop by Southbank to a GQ feature: Fashion-writer-who-actually-skates-and-can-write, Noah Johnson, profiled the minds behind Palace for a feature in Famous Men’s Magazine™.

Heckride interviewed Johnny and Mitchell’s brother, Andrew. Very excited for Coots’ video ♥

There is no shortage of crust evangelists working in New York skateboarding today, but every once in a while, there’s a part so endlessly dedicated to spots with eight things wrong with them that you need to stop and give #respect. Charlie Cassidy’s 4 x 4 part is one of those, and Vague mag has the part + an interview with him about it. The cast of In Crust We Trust would be proud :)

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A Tribute To The Endurance of Those Who Skate The Medians

We all know the ancient proverb: “One man’s infrastructural banality is another man’s tailslide.”

But for all the details of cities that skateboarders pay a perverse amount of attention to — the positioning of cracks before stairs, the shapes of curbs, literal fucking trashcans — our ability to isolate a select few traffic medians as desirable places to hang out at is an under-appreciated tidbit of our lunacy.

To the average person, a median divides two opposing directions of traffic. Unless someone is an engineer, there is absolutely no reason to spend any of their precious time on earth thinking about one. To a skateboarder though… it’s not a ledge, it’s not a curb — it’s a ledge on TOP of a curb.

Given our struggles of just being left alone at a decent-enough ledge, some of our more able-bodied colleagues sought refuge in the soothing serenity of New York City traffic. And like many parables of post-Financial Crisis skateboarding, this one begins with Jake Johnson.

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Two Weekends Later… Brian Reid’s Grand Collection Part

Eggs’ Brian Reid has a new part for Grand Collection out today. Between the front crook and immediate curve-out on the White Hubba currently undergoing its third (fourth?) post-deknob renaissance, the nonchalant no-push lines at Museum of Natural History + Lenox, and a kickflip back noseblunt that most would be ok with retiring on, the guy really continues his string of imprinting tricks in your mind with every video appearance.

Word is that this took two weekends to film, and it’s more eventful than what many could do in twice the runtime. Excited to see what else is headed our way. Imagine three (!) weekends of this! ;) ♥

Guest appearance from Danny Dipalo. Filmed and edited by J.P. Blair With The Hair.

F.T.I. Presents: ‘CLUB DRAGON’

Some of you might remember the “EGG” edit that graced the homepage of this website back in November of last year, which was an Orchard Skateshop production showcasing the new generation of talent coming of age at Boston’s premier ledge spot.

“Club Dragon” is the latest from that crew — except instead of a one-spot outing, the tricks honed at Eggs also make their way to an ensemble of New York City ledge spots and greater Boston locations that have become increasingly a go in the COVID age of lower security.

The video is edited by Myles Underwood, who just launched a Fuck This Industry webstore to commemorate the new project / brand / whatever they decide to turn it into ♥

Stop right now, don’t comment on it, go watch something else on YouTube

Features: Myles Underwood, Dana Ericson, Brian Reid, Sean Evans, Ismael Diallo, Ben Tenner, Armin Bachman, Luca Ettore and Dutchy.

Filmed by: Kevin Madden, J.P. Blair, Paul Young and Mikey Mazzarese.

Orchard Skateshop Presents.. ‘EGG’

Words by Frozen in Carbonite
Filmed & Edited by Lee Madden

Last year, MIT scientist Andrew Sutherland helped solve an equation that had vexed the world’s premier mathemeticians for half a century: x³y³z³= k when k=42.

As this MIT news item states, “This sum of three cubes puzzle, first set in 1954 at the University of Cambridge and known as the Diophantine Equation x³y³z³=k, challenged mathematicians to find solutions for numbers 1-100. With smaller numbers, this type of equation is easier to solve: for example, 29 could be written as 3³+ 1³+ 1³, while 32 is unsolvable. All were eventually solved, or proved unsolvable, using various techniques and supercomputers, except for two numbers: 33 and 42.”

A mile or so up the Charles River, the elite ledge scientists of Boston use their own techniques to devise previously unimagined trick algorithms.

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