An Interview With John Gardner

August 10th, 2017 | 2:51 pm | Features & Interviews | No Comments

Photo by Andy Enos

Intro & Interview by Zach Baker

A dope thing about skateboarding is that it attracts an endless variety of people, who are each drawn to it for their own specific reasons. We all have our unique relationships within skateboarding as far as what we want to do, who we want to be around, and where we want to go on, with, or because of them.

John Gardner’s motivations on a skateboard are not so easily pigeon-holed, though it can be said that he’s not adhering to any sort of trends in attire, trick selection, or really, well anything. It makes one wonder whether he even needs a skateboard. Like, if the skateboard were never invented, I feel like John Gardner would figure out some other vehicle to sate his physical and creative urges. This points to part of what makes him such a delight to watch. For some people, skateboarding is what creates their identity. But for John, the skateboard is just an accessory, one of many mediums lending themselves to his way of life and creative pursuits. Without the board, he’d be no less extraordinary, but as skateboarders, we couldn’t be more fortunate to have him as a member of the club.

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To start…the video part. It was just a pleasure to watch. Give me a little overview.

I had a bunch of VX footage that was just kind of sitting around, and I had always wanted to make music for a video part but never really had an opportunity to do so, so I immediately connected the dots and thought that this would be a great opportunity to make that happen. It’s over the course of two-and-a-half years, whenever a VX came out. Some of those clips might even be three of four years old. A lot of it is in California with some Jersey sprinkled in between.

Tell me about the soundtrack.

My friend Max Hersteiner, who I used to live with, is in an amazing band called Dirty Fences — he’s in a couple bands actually, Dirty Fences and Metal Leg. He and the bassist of Dirty Fences and Metal Leg, Max Komaski, all created music together for various video projects that I’ve made, so I hit those dudes up immediately to just jam and see what we came up with. Max’s friend Danny Cooper played guitar for the soundtrack. We just set up a camera, experimented and that’s what we came up with.

What’s up with your uncle?

My uncle is a wild man. He is my uncle Semo, my dad’s brother. He has a lot of upper body strength and is really good at doing handstands. He would walk up and down stairs on his hands when he was younger, so he naturally gravitated to riding a skateboard on his hands. I had a camera and wanted him to be in this little video that I was making, so we drove around looking for a little hill and filmed him doing his thing and that’s what I got. He loves skateboarding and he really tries but he skates better on his hands than I would say he skates on his feet.

John Gardner For Quartersnacks

August 8th, 2017 | 12:36 pm | Video & Remixes | 2 Comments

Photo by Colin Sussingham

Good video parts will have inspired trick selections, unique eyes towards tired spots, or any number of buzzwords you’ve caught prefacing a embedded video on a skate website. Then there are guys who, simply put, remind you how fun riding a skateboard is — the guys with a free-flowing rhythm that fools you into believing they didn’t break a single sweat bead of frustration throughout the process. Though John’s Bruns 2 section probably made me yell at my computer screen 5+ times, it still felt like he smiled his way through filming for the entire thing.

With us clocking in at an average of one dedicated QS part a year, we’re honored to present John Gardner with the latest in our annual tradition.

Filmed by Dan Balducci, Austin Leleu, Andrew Petillo, Tony Choy, Kevin Winters, Chris Gregson, Josh Spooner, Ethan Rhoads. Edited by John Gardner.

Chit Chat

August 7th, 2017 | 2:33 pm | Daily News | 4 Comments

Still late. Oh you thought the slump was over? New #content dropping tomorrow though :)

The roster and categories for the 2017 Dime Glory Challenge have been released. Tiago will be there. You can read Baker’s wonderful recap of last year’s event here.

Manchild has some New York clips in his raw B-sides video from The Flare (check the 5:18 mark), Bobby De Keyzer has some New York clips in his now-online Riddles part, and Paul Young has a quick compilation video from the Bronx Courthouse ledge-to-bank, one of the few New York spots to appear in a 411 opener.

Jason Byoun has a clip from the pool people have been skating in the purgatory abyss of Midwood. Be careful, because people have been getting tickets.

Was Nyjah’s rave the most 1990s thing so far this summer?”

To supplement Mike Arnold’s incredible “Lloyd’s” part, Sidewalk threw together a two part history of England’s second most famous skate spot :)

With one-spot parts trending hard these past several years, Politic’s sister brand, The Vacation, put together a remix video of Ross Norman (a.k.a. the guy Hjalte stole all his tricks from) at Legislative Plaza, one of the few remaining plaza™ spots in the U.S.

“That is what skating does: it fills the cracks in society…”

An undercover cop wearing DC once asked us what DC stood for. We told him it stood for “Danny and Colin.” I guess we lied. Anyway, Droors Clothing is making a comeback. Alphanumeric up next?

Fucked up T.F. obstacle hall of fame, first ballot

“There’s no hierarchy there. No one tries to out cool each other. And I love that the place is a real public place in the sense that you meet other people there and you get to see real city life. It’s warm, it’s tough – it’s diverse.” Village Psychic with some more knowledge from the skateboard utopia that exists in Denmark’s capital city.

And on that note, Max Hull has a video recap of the drunkest skateboard contest on earth. It’s the only bit of CPH Open coverage I’ve managed to watch in full.

The Northern Co. boys skate the Willy B Momument, Delancey curbs + the Banks.

And like that, the trinity of 6th Ave. spots that defined our adolescent years is gone. Though it has been 70% skateblocked since 2011, Ziegfeld is now closed off for renovations. You might be able to skate the barrier off the ledge though ;)

“I learned a word the other day. Refurbish.” C’mon you know that’s a five.

Quote of the Week: “Two years from now, we’ll all be living in Maspeth.” — Max Palmer re: increasing rent costs in New York City

2 Bros. has a new logo.

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Quartersnacks Top 10 — August 4, 2017

August 4th, 2017 | 11:10 am | Daily News | 3 Comments

We have yet another Noseslide of the Year contender, Spencer Hamilton has the best posture in skateboarding, and 360 flips are regaining on marketshare over the backside bigspin as the trick most likely to get casually thrown in at the end of a line. Oh, and #4 would be #1 had Lucas not earned a Trick Heard Around the World™ trophy with the one he did at MACBA ~two years ago. Have a good one :)

Original Clips:

Spoiler

Intro via @rongerguy_official2 [link] 10) Casey Foley via “4 Free” [link] 9) Cooper Winterson via IG [link] 8) Ruben Spelta via IG [link] 7) Ishod Wair via Nike SB’s “Camp Pain” video [link] 6) Bobby Worrest via Riddles in Mathematics [link] 5) Corey Kennedy via Nike SB’s “Camp Pain” video [link] 4) Jacopo Carozzi via IG [Link] 3) Miek Arnold via “Lloyd’s” [link] 2) Spencer Hamilton via IG [link] 1) Quirin Staudt via “Oh Snap!” [link]

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Previously: July 28, 2017

Long Island With Gino Iannucci

August 3rd, 2017 | 3:33 pm | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

Words & Interview by Zach Baker
Portrait by Marcel Veldman

A noted distinction between skateboarder-types and the rest of the world is that we have knack from drumming up cool shit in even some of the wackest places. You’re probably bored to bits by the cliched assertion that “skaters see the world differently,” but that whole “most people just see a bench while we see a canvas” thing still holds some weight, and it can be argued that this critical gaze extends beyond spotting natural transitions and waxable granite. We’re generally discerning, attentive to detail and uncover the most flattering aspects in even the most mundane of areas.

So we’ve started a new little recurring series where skaters we admire guide us through their hometowns. The first one is with Gino.

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I was born in Manhasset, Long Island. It’s towards the north shore, center of Long Island, about forty minutes by train, half hour drive from the city. I grew up in Westbury, Nassau County, which is about a ten-minute drive from Manhasset. Westbury was a mix of upper middle class, middle class, and a little bit beneath middle class. We lived really close to the border of the extremely wealthy, which is right over the Jericho Turnpike in Old Westbury. It was really close to some unreal, beautiful homes. As far as nationalities: heavy Italian, heavy Irish, heavy African-American in Westbury. When I was growing up you could see the South American and El Salvadorian community growing, and now the Spanish are like the Italians of when I was younger.