‘Bout to Leave the Crib With a Couple of My Pirates

August 18th, 2014 | 5:03 am | Daily News | 7 Comments

cold candy

Been slow around here, but things should be picking up soon

Switch bigspin heelflip down the L.E.S. Park double-set.

Gigliotti made a new clip. It has Ted, Olson, etc. in it.

Jahmal Williams has a video interview with Japan’s Far East Skate Network about Static 4, along with some indoor park footage afterwards. “I’d rather see Jahmal do a 5050″ is the new “I’d rather see Gino push” for the rest of 2014.

ICYMI and also on the topic of Static 4, Chris Nieratko interviewed Josh Stewart for a 17 Things You Didn’t Know About Static 4 feature on Vice, and Live Skateboard Media has yet another interview with Josh, which tackles a lot of unchartered topics from his recent interviews, e.g. music re-usage boundaries in skate videos.

Needless to say, this isn’t the Bobby Shmurda clip everyone has been expecting.

If you started skating around the height of Shorty’s reign as the coolest skateboard company around, you no doubt looked up to Sammy Baptista on account of his #youngestofdacamp status. Well, while we wait for O’Dell to (hopefully) complete the Muska and/or Shorty’s Epicly Later’d, the “My Name Is” series caught up with Sammy to look back on his skate career. (The dude still rips btw.)

#musicthatdoesntmatch, except we’re not really ones to talk

It has only been ~two years since the skateboard internet embraced #listicle #culture, and writers have already run out of ideas.

Speaking of ideas and #listicles, here are ten skateboard “innovations” that never caught on. [Turns out the entire concept and research behind it was from a series Vert is Dead did this past spring, so consult their posts.] What about Ollie Pop Bubble Gum, Spoonfish Board Locks, Dooks shock pads, bearing “rims,” and Aircraft Skateboards?

People are skating the early-2000s classic little kid spot, Central Park “Hubba” again! (At least in the new video blog from the Beef Patty dudes.)

Trash cans are the new picnic tables.

Simple formula: Edit your skate clip to Migos and it will get posted on this website.

This piece on deriving life lessons from Thug Motivation 101 is a little cheesy, but its heart is in the right place.

Quote of the Week: “I don’t understand why people don’t fuck with Yahoo.” — Peter Sidlauskas

A two-hour DJ Mustard mix might help you forget that the summer is actually over :(

Five Favorite Parts With Scott Johnston

August 13th, 2014 | 5:03 am | Features & Interviews | 35 Comments

sj-bill-ben-colen

Photo by Ben Colen

Dropped the ball with this series a bit throughout the summer (skating and traveling bro), but getting back on it now. The request line is always open btw :)

The latest installment comes from a guy who is synonymous with style and proper form on a skateboard. A close associate of the website once described one of his maneuvers as “the greatest trick ever done.” (Not to be confused with “the greatest trick never done.”) This also means that we have unintentionally covered 60% of the guys with parts in Mad Circle’s Five Flavors video, and that Sheffey has shot up to second place in the “Most Frequently Discussed Part” ranking for this series.

4 P.M. Links :(

August 11th, 2014 | 4:33 pm | Daily News | 6 Comments

unis

UNIS.

Manolo’s “20 Years of Chocolate” remix will bring a tear to your eye.

Still one of the craziest things ever done on a skateboard. Dude was too futuristic.

“Tyshawn Jones is really getting some air! Now I hope that he and others of his ilk are billed for the damage they cause to the steps and walls of monuments and public areas around the city.” TJ got a photo in the Times this past weekend. Some commenters were upset. We should ban everything except walking. That’d be cool.

SMLTalk has been doing some hard-hitting investigative journalism as of late. First, they use Kevin Bradley’s bump-to-bar grab from “cherry” as a springboard to assess the history of acceptable grabs on street, and though it went online a few weeks ago, this piece on the demise of the pop shove-it is also worth your consideration.

Boil the Ocean on Stativ IV and the future of full-length videos.

Some Bronze B-sides. ICYMI: Jenkem interviewed Peter about dark corners of the internet last week. (Here’s another interview with him and Pat from last fall.)

Quick Acapulco Gold clip with a 2013 Q.S.O.T.Y. Leo Gutman sighting.

This “Steep Banks” account on YouTube started uploading a lot of Long Island-based gems from the nineties: Frank Gerwer in midtown circa 1997 and R.I.P. Burritoville and Broadway Bump, two of the greatest lil’ kid spots in New York skateboarding history.

Well, a summer montage to “We Dem Boyz” was pretty inevitable.

Columbus Circle is fun.

A look at the current breed of skate videos coming out of Philadelphia.

Wasn’t expecting to link a video of a guy on Jart today, but some of the stuff in this Fran Molina part is undeniably insane. He destroys MACBA without even hitting the ledges much, and skates sorta like a Euro Torey Pudwill. (Who, by the way, was recently discovered to be maybe the third Jewish pro skateboarder ever. Time to amend this post.)

Uhh…Young Thug was on The Tonight Show.

Quote of the Week: “Yo you know what’s fact? Most pretty girls have bigass foreheads.” — Overheard at Lenox Ledges

Sorry for the slow start to the week. Cool stuff soon?

Weekend Viewing: Tom Penny’s Menik Mati Part

August 8th, 2014 | 11:00 am | Time Capsule | 14 Comments

menik mati vhs

There are occasions when you see certain pros skate in real life, and immediately reevaluate any under-appreciation you may have built towards their skating through videos. There are other times when you see a spot that the said pro has skated, and do the same. Seeing Penny push around doing kickflips in real life is probably amazing, but having never seen that, visiting the Copenhagen Wonderland Bowl that he skates in nearly all of his footage might have been enough.

Despite everyone insisting that “Yes, that is the same extension he 360 flipped in the éS ad,” you’d still be reluctant to believe it after seeing it. That thing is a wall.

pennytrevertchrome

It’s funny how the phrase “You’ll understand when you’re older” also applies to skate videos. Menik Mati was the biggest blockbuster video of its time, and maybe the first $30+ skate video. (Blades was the only place well-stocked with copies that winter, and pretty sure they were ~$35 after tax. It was absurd.) Kids were hyped on literally everything except Penny’s part, which for many of us, was the first time we were seeing him skate: “Who is this dude that everyone kept talking about? He can only do five tricks and didn’t even film a new part.”

Now, with over a decade of hindsight, Menik Mati aged worse than many of its contemporaries. Sight Unseen, Yeah Right and Chomp are all classics, but the éS video looks like a playbook of overwrought 2000s blockbuster video indulgences. (Except jump cutting, got to give it credit for avoiding that.) Arto would one up himself a year later with the best part of his career, Rodrigo is still getting better at skating in 2014, Burnquist is grinding helicopters, and Koston’s Menik Mati part — as groundbreaking as it was — is his only, like, not “fun” part, ever. (Creager’s part is still pretty cool TBH. Frontside noseslides on regular ledges!)

Hints From Other Worlds

August 6th, 2014 | 1:28 pm | Daily News | 13 Comments

spring court

“Konchalski is New York’s chief basketball curator and historian, someone who has long celebrated the city’s excellence, but on that afternoon, riding out to Long Island, he looked out at the playground courts and felt troubled by what he saw. For decades, those courts had been filled with ballplayers, kids shoveling the snow or stumbling through the heat so they could go 1-on-15 in overcrowded games of 21.5 Courts like these had molded players like Cousy and King and Mullin into stars; these blacktops had turned playground savants like Earl ‘The Goat’ Manigault and Joe ‘The Destroyer’ Hammond into city legends. But now, out the window, he saw skateboards. Not basketballs. Skateboards.” — The Mecca in Decline: Why doesn’t New York City produce elite NBA talent like it used to?

The excerpt above is from Jordan Ritter Conn’s excellent Grantland article about the declining level of basketball talent in New York City (Lance Stephenson withstanding, obvs.) Even if you don’t follow the sport, it is an interesting take on the evolution of recreational activity in this city.

Basketball has long been New York’s main athletic export because it has never been able to accommodate the space required for a football or baseball field, hence the lack of MLB or NFL players to emerge from the city. Except now, even NCAA Division I basketball prospects are going elsewhere, as it has grown so strained for space that courts and adequate high school facilities are becoming scarce. There is less cultural importance placed on the game because there is less space to play it.

Couple this with the fact that “for the first time in nearly a hundred years, the rate of urban population growth outpaced suburban growth, reversing a trend that held steady for every decade since the invention of the automobile.” Do you think there is going to be any more space for traditional sports in cities, let alone New York?

Slightly relevant. By Joe Cups, 2011.

Konchalski’s observation that skateboards are becoming more common on basketball courts than basketballs is interesting when juxtaposed against a certain line of thinking that emanates from the “state of skateboarding” crowd. (Worst phrase ever, by the way.) There has always been a certain breed of doomsayer who would ask “Well when skateboarding isn’t popular, where is so-and-so going to be and what is so-and-so going to do?” …what? Do you guys live in some town where twenty people skate and four of them quit so skateboarding became 20% less popular? Have you walked around any major American city lately — even the ones with minimal skate spots? There is a skateboard rattling behind your head every ten, if not five minutes.

And no, l*ngb**rds don’t rattle.

Filed Under: Daily News | Tags: , ,