Still in Miami

April 13th, 2015 | 5:03 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

jp

Thanks to everyone who grabbed something from the webstore this past week. We’re just getting caught up with orders now, so please hold any “Where’s my stuff”-emails until at least the middle of the week. Still some sizes in hoodys, shorts and jerseys left, plus all sizes of the tees except the Vacation one :)

HD video blog #10 via Johnny Wilson. Springtime is nice.

Part two of the Peter Smolik and Brandon Turner Weekend Buzz is now live. He hates food pics. “Motherfucker, do I look like Slimer to you?”

Sort of on that same note, can’t recall an interview that really elaborated on just how much money the average “A-list” pro skateboarder made in the early-2000s as Jenkem’s new one with Kenny Getz re: “the CKY era.”

Someone on Slap scanned the entire Olson TWS cover interview in a readable resolution. All New York photos. He does darkslides now.

Wenning was stressed out filming for Photosynthesis ten days before deadline.

After numerous false starts at digitizing their archive, Know Skate and TWS announced that every 411VM segment will be available via an app by the end of this year. (ICYMI: Somewhat relevant old QS post.)

Haven’t seen much from this dude as of late, but glad he’s still putting out solid parts: New one from Austin Kanfoush. Boardslide S.F. 3-up-3-down is super chill.

Cool five-minute montage from the NJ Skateshop squad.

NY Skateboarding has a bit more info on the skatepark being built in place of the Fat Kid Spot. And yes, they should keep the name “Fat Kid Spot” for it, with the green Parks Department leaf under the name and all. Don’t forget that there’s also supposed to be a new park built in Harlem for the summer, too. (Even though #lenox4ever.)

SMLTalk on the music supervision of THPS, the soundtrack of your youth.

Live has a web premiere of “Grapevine,” a ten-minute, largely New York-based video with quick VX/night footage-heavy #Japanese ‘n #French #vibez.

This was a cool read. These “20 Years of Girl / Chocolate” interviews tend to all go down similar lines of questioning, but it feels like there aren’t a ton of Jeron Wilson interviews out there, so…

The first-ever Vans video, Propeller, is premiering in New York on May 1st, at 10 P.M., right by Columbus Circle on 62nd and Broadway.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Can’t imagine J.R. Smith being a person younger NBA players should be taking much advice from, unless he’s relaying proper post-4 A.M. club etiquette… Get well soon, Chris Copeland. Also on the topic of former Knicks, glad to see Galinari shining post-injury.

Quote of the Week:

tbird

Bronze 56k x Star Wars — Japan only exclusive.

An Interview With Philly Santosuosso

April 10th, 2015 | 4:00 am | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

philly wallride

Photo by G. Dagostaro

Most people do not know much about skateboarding in New Orleans. You can walk down a major city’s downtown anywhere in America and bet on seeing at least a few skateable things. When you walk around downtown New Orleans, where the few tall buildings are, and there’s next to nothing. (Places like that make me feel bad about writing things like this, even as a joke.) Its first public skatepark has been entangled in red tape for years. Its most recognizable skater might be Lil’ Wayne.

Philly and Humidity have been our lens into New Orleans’ underreported skate scene for years now, a city that manages to make something out of not very much.

+++++++

Not many people think of New Orleans as a skate city. How did you first get into skating down there?

My half brother got into skating when I was eight or nine, then quit, and I kept going. There was a small indoor park called Second Nature, which was run by the best skaters in the city. I hung out there, and they had a skate shop that you could rent skate videos from. I would watch a lot of 411s, video after video, and that exposed me to what was going on in skating. I ended up riding for the shop inside the park when I got a little older.

What was the scene like at that time? It feels like it never gets much coverage.

Duane Pitre is from here, and was riding for Alien Workshop around that time. The first actual skateboard I bought was off his grandma, who owned poodle grooming shop where she also sold his boards. Dyrdek would come down — when Dyrdek ollies over a shopping cart off a little bump in Mind Field in one of his little clips from when he was younger — that’s actually in New Orleans. Sal Barbier is also from here, so there was a good community of skateboarders at that time when I was first starting to skate.

I didn’t even know New Orleans sucked for skating until later.

Filmed by Thom Musso / The Man Who Films

Why do you say you realized it sucked?

First, the park closed down. Then, the first Zero video came out, which was sick, but really bummed me out on skating. I saw that everything was about jumping down shit. In New Orleans, we have like one eight-stair and couldn’t really follow in that direction. I was young, so I got a bit more into BMX instead, building dirt jumps and shit, being a kid, you know?

Connor Champion: Y Upgrade…NC to NYC Part

April 8th, 2015 | 5:17 am | Footage | 10 Comments

connor-lipslide

Photo by Zach Baker

Connor filmed the majority of this part throughout 2014, with a few clips from the tolerable days of this past winter. Half New York / half North Carolina, cut up to a late bloomer (at least in New York…) of a “Song of the Spring” candidate, and the greatest punctuation anthem of all time. Enjoy.

Contributing filmers: Chris Hall, Gray Mclamrock, Dan Murphy, Ben Gazda, Gree O’Donnell, R.B. Umali and Johnny Wilson. Shout out to the springtime :)

Guest tricks from Bob Reynolds and Tyler Tufty.

Alternate YouTube Link

Filed Under: Footage | Tags: ,

The Einstein of Swishy Pants

April 6th, 2015 | 5:25 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

jersey3

The Quartersnacks web store is now open. If you are in Japan, Argument Skateshop sells the stuff online, which could save you quite a bit on shipping. Also available from Black Sheep, Commissary, Exit, Homebase, Labor, NJ, Orchard, Seasons, Supreme N.Y. + L.A. & Uprise. Support your local skate site :)

TWS put Zered’s Outliers part online, in addition to an accompanying interview.

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Peter Smolik * But Were Afraid to Ask.” Can’t say a proper skate part from this year has been able to incite as much joy as this interview with Smolik and Brandon Turner. They talk about everything: Shorty’s, strippers, the G-Bag, the Sag-No-Drag system, the peak era of “rock star skateboarders.” Picking the overall best quote is next to impossible, but “Give me a snow camo Navigator or I ain’t gonna fuck with you” might be the frontrunner.

Eli Reed v.s. the latest incarnation of Houston Street construction. Wouldn’t be mad at a whole part of this. Really: what are New York skaters going to do for spots when there’s no more construction on Houston Street? Or is that always a stupid question because we all know Houston will always be under construction?

Village Psychic did some research on a skate deck’s relative immunity to inflation.

Yaje has been living in California for a bit now, and yes he still has all his powers.

Nieratko interviewed J. Strickland, principal mastermind behind Baker Bootleg and other things that shaped the direction of skateboarding throughout the 2000s.

Bronze in San Francisco, the photo edition, and Bronze in San Francisco, the video edition. Speaking of Bronze — they’re influential.

In light of the recent shade thrown towards the Birdman (not Brian Williams) by way of an Australian vert skater documentary, SMLTalk went and compiled the non-board flipping skate icon’s greatest achievements.

Here’s a quick Q & A with Q.S.S.O.T.D., Lucas Puig. Also found this recent-ish Ray Barbee interview on that site, though can’t get an exact post date. He’s a “cherry” fan.

There are some hot moves in this new, random Red Bull New York montage.

Mostly Skateboarding continues its podcast series. The new one’s with Donny Barley.

No idea what the new Boil the Ocean post is talking about. Give it a try?

More desaturated Dutch skateboarding in the latest POP clip. P.S. QS gear should be making its way to shops in The Netherlands this week ;)

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week [turn on the audio]:

Quote of the Week: “I just saw you skateboarding down Grand Street with a bunch of children.” — A Girl

Fetty Wap comes through with his third good song!

‘What Is Dime?’ — An Interview With Antoine Asselin & Phil Lavoie

April 3rd, 2015 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

dime-lotus

This originally appeared in Dank Skate Mag issue number 8. We felt this was worth sharing online, given the slim chance that you have difficulty obtaining Norwegian skateboard magazines where you live.

Dime is one of the greatest “things” in skateboarding. I say “things” because even they don’t exactly know what they are. A brand, a crew, a series of videos, something? Being funny is hard enough, but being a funny skate crew — without falling into the same overused tropes of weed and dick humor as every other skater on Instagram — is impossible. These dudes somehow figured it out, all while embracing the relative invisibility of Canadians in skateboarding.

+++++++

What is Dime?

Phil: It’s a bit different than what it started out as. Now, it’s a brand, but it became one accidentally. At first it was a crew, and we just skated together and made videos.

Antoine: It started as a shitty website that we never updated. We were fifteen-years-old, just posting shitty web clips. We started making full-lengths and it grew from there.

P: We sell some clothes, but it’s not really a clothing brand or a skate video brand. Everything we make is just for fun.

It’s kind of a good era with the internet and all to have the luxury of not knowing what you’re doing.

A: We’re not too sure what it is ourselves. We’re just going with the flow. I think people like not knowing what it is.

P: It’s nice being able to do whatever you want whenever you want. Whenever we have a good idea, we do it. Real clothing companies have timed fall drops, and we’re completely lost on that. We’re trying to learn everything as we go along.

Alexis Lacroix in the back: No definition, no limits.

P: Our goal is to skate. Anything to keep us around skateboarding. That’s what we like to do. I’m never going to become a professional skateboarder, so I might as well make something I want to do in skateboarding. Antoine makes money off his sponsors and all, but I quit my job to focus on Dime.

So, the goal of Dime is to keep you dudes from having real jobs for as long as possible?

A: To us, it’s not work. Now, we have clothing in stores, so we have to be more on point, but it doesn’t feel like work. We want to do this.