When you’re in the club and you see me – High five!

The block said, ‘Dro you need to drop.’ Well, here it go…

Attempting to out-do the infamous MTA montage, the Mandible Claw crew put out a “Rush Hour” clip centered around skitching, and skating on motor vehicles. Considering there are no Jackie Chan or Chris Tucker cameos, they should’ve just named this “Arrest me, please.” Cops seem pretty content to kick people’s asses for no real reason these days, so God bless Colin and the rest of the crew for risking themselves for our entertainment.

The underground king of Queens, Rob Campbell, has a new “Day in the Life” clip up for his company, New Breed skateboards.

Will skateboarders ever get tired of editing things to songs from Jeru the Damaja’s first album? Probably not. Back tail stall at the Bubble Banks is real sick though, and Future’s debut album, Pluto, drops on 01/31/12.

In an effort to remedy “soft music” criticisms stemming from their first throwaway clip, the “Death Video” crew called upon the services of Cameron Giles and put out an “ignorant edit” promo. Why would anyone want to ollie off that small hut at the Queensboro Bridge downhill ledges?

Late, but insane: You apparently cannot skate the Thomas Greene Park spot (a place designated built for skateboarding) unless you are accompanying a small child. Good to know that the NYPD has its priorities in order when it comes to Brooklyn.

Events: 1) If you’re into art and stuff, the Gonz is having an exhibition of photos and illustrations from the past year starting tomorrow and lasting through January 7. 2) The Shake Junt video premieres at KCDC this Sunday. 3) Jeremy Elkin’s new, NYC-based video, Poisonous Products premieres tomorrow at 74A East 4th Street at 8:30 P.M. Flyer here.

Spot Updates: 1) Who’s the genius that decided to knob the ledges — yes, the ledges — at Brick Nine? “Why are they still skating here? I thought they were supposed to stop skating?” 2) You obviously can’t skate World Trade anymore because of the protests, but Chase is also blocked off on account of them.

Quote of the Week: “Yo, Chinatown is crazy. I feel like I’m in Tokyo.” — E.J.


P.S. People in Jersey are real smart. Well, maybe not as smart as this guy.

P.P.S. Payless has a knock-off of the Dylan Gravis shoe on sale for $13.

The Time They Got It Right…

Why exactly skatepark designers, when put to task of maximizing on a space in New York City, have opted for throwing in everything throughout a park minus a regular ledge is anyone’s guess. Tribeca, Maloof, and Astoria barely have anything you could call a regular ledge, yet somehow, ledges would be on the top of the list if you ask someone what sort of spot they’d like to have more of in New York. Lenox is our best ledge spot, and five thousand people will come to the T.F. when there’s a new box. (But then again, many of us go to the T.F. for the culture, so the box is hardly an incentive.) By some miracle, McCarren got it right, and appropriately enough, the park is so awful that you could actually consider it to be a legitimate street spot.

The people at Open Road, California Skateparks, Friends of Douglass Greene Park, and the Tony Hawk Foundation were smart enough to figure out that the best thing for New York, a place where twenty people would line up to skate a concrete island into traffic in the back of Union Square, would be to put three ledge-like obstacles in a basketball court, as opposed to spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to build a wedge ramp to a ledge with a Euro gap three feet after it. Now at Douglass Greene Park on 3rd Avenue and Degraw Street in Park Slope, they have a bench with one curved side and another straight side, a low manual pad, and an up-and-down sort of triangle ledge, all on familiar basketball court ground. Take the D, N or R to Union Street, skate north for two blocks, and make a left on Degraw.

Billy claims that the Parks Department still has all the original marble from Red Benches, BAM, etc. in storage. It’d definitely be a step in the right direction if they recycled it into a similar type of project instead of building six other skateparks that get crowded as soon as school gets out.

[Spotted via NY Skateboarding]

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