Banished To Our Memories — Rest in Peace to Forbidden Banks

The Forbidden Banks are no more.

There has seldom been a Manhattan spot that incited thoughts of “Well, what did you think was going to happen when you built this?” quite like Forbidden Banks did.

Located between an apartment building and the Jamaican Consulate, this maybe five-foot-high brick embankment lead up to an uninviting wooden platform. The spot was nestled between so many tall buildings that it rarely encountered natural light; there are far better parks nearby for an office worker to enjoy lunch, and few people ever chilled here.

The plaza did, however, invite an unintentional activity.

This spot had been around since many of us were kids skating midtown for the first time. It earned its name because you could consider yourself lucky if you got more than a try-and-a-half. How they hadn’t skateblocked it after decades of trench warfare with security and doormen was one of New York skateboarding’s great mysteries.

Keep Reading »

Something About Something

Photo by Daniel Weiss

For Me” is a new montage by Matt Velez of Calzone and Sable fame, and features a full ensemble of Bronze affiliates.

Max Hull shot a video of the skate jam at Ann Van for Wilkie two weekends ago ♥

Keith Denley has a trick in the new six-minute edit from Theories of Atlantis.

Keep Reading »

The Switch Inward Heelflip You Never Knew You Needed & Other Happenings About Town

We began the decade by burning an impossible over a bench into memory — a trick that had, with a few exceptions, largely sat dormant for the better part of twenty years.

A couple kids got into doing pressure flips.

Then, for a minute there, the heelflip became the new kickflip varial flip.

Tallying every trick that had gone down at every gap became burdensome. The best real estate for a switch tre down D7 in 2015 was the part of a Johnny Wilson clip when the drums began to cut out of a Moodymann song. (Jk, that clip is one of the best things of the past decade. Switch tre is obvs beast too.)

Keep Reading »

So Random, This One

Photo by Bryce Kanights. Scan via Science Versus Life

“So, you’re smoking weed on the plane at…13-years-old.” This Steven Cales “Nine Club” interview is full of gems from late-80s and early-90s New York. If you want some footage accompaniments to the people/companies/places/era he talks about a lot, check these 88-92 Skate N.Y.C. videos that surfaced on YouTube back in 2011.

Our dear friends at Lottie’s Skateshop collaborated with Spitfire and released one of the funnest all-L.A. edits in recent memory. Features legends like Andrew Reynolds, Michael Gigliotti and Danny Brady.

Memory Screen has a nine-minute montage up to commemorate the bro Mark Gonzales’ 50th birthday, edited to the another early-00s Real rider’s song from maybe my favorite video part ever :)

#TRENDWATCH2018: Are trips to Marseille the new trips to Paris?

The new, and improved Love Park is finally open! And it’s so bad that the designer of the Love sculpture decided to depart to another plane of existence.

And on a related, nothing-to-do-with-skateboarding but everything-do-with-skateboarding note, Village Psychic interviewed Nils Norman about the study of defensive architecture via Dismal Garden.

Theories of Atlantis is at the helm of a new wheel company called Dial Tone MFG. They have a new edit up featuring teamriders Jahmal Williams, Alexis Sablone, others.

The Bronze Instagram story has documentation of perhaps the biggest development to happen to skateboarding in midtown Manhattan since incentive zoning.

With every New Yorker’s favorite L.A. spot reaching an unfortunate demise, Andrew Allen provides us with the story behind the day when he backside flipped into the main bank at L.A. High.

Max Hull put together an iPhone montage from a winter Barcelona trip.

Smalls uploaded Pulaski montage 12 of 500 from Stop Fakin’ 3 ;) ♥

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: By the looks of it, this might be the final installment of the Sports Desk until the fall, but gotta give it to J.R. Smith running to the liquor store in the final two seconds of an NBA Finals game.

Quote of the Week: “So, Die Antwoord is these white people who rap.” — E.J.

A Short History of New York’s Longest Lines

Ricky Oyola, godfather of the east coast “filming a line via just skating random shit on the street”-practice, once expounded on his peak skateboard dream: doing a line through Philadelphia’s then-standing City Hall, into the street, up into the Municipal Services building, back down the stairs, across the street, into Love Park, through Love Park, and end at Wawa.

The closest he got on record was a line from the end of City Hall, through the intersection, and into Love Park in Eastern Exposure 2, but it did establish a lingering precedent for connecting spots. Apart from Ricky and that Joey O’Brien Sabotage 4 line where he starts at Love and ends up in the garage beneath it, spot connecting does not have a rich history in Philadelphia.

Or anywhere, really — because doing a line from one spot, through the street, and to another, is fucking hard. There are variables (people, traffic, pebbles, maybe two sets of security, acts of God), and a pressing anxiety of missing the final trick in an already-long line, which gets amplified by the fact that fifteen other things went right up until that point. As you will soon learn, spot connecting is something most people do for the sake of doing it. In the majority of cases, they stick to their safe tricks.

Like Philadelphia, New York is a dense and layered city. Many of its streets are narrow, and depending on where you are, three or four spots could be across from one another. New York never had a “Big Three,” but it does have three different types of benches on four different street corners, and over the years, skateboarders here have kept their third eyes open and far-sighted.

Keep Reading »