It’s Hollywood, Baby!

Via @lord_give_me_a_sign_nyc

Just like that, the final remaining of the “Big 3” east coast skate plazas is in jeopardy of being lost to re-design. (We all know the Love one turned out great 🤮) Please sign the petition to help save Freedom Plaza A.K.A. Pulaski Park from reconstruction.

You don’t need to be one of the sentimental-about-skating types to get emotional watching Revolutions on Granite, the documentary that Thrasher premiered late last week about the central spot in Kiev and Ukrainian skate scene — which was made before the Russian invasion, but obviously takes on new significance and urgency now. (Turn the subtitles on in the YouTube options.)

Keep Reading »

Stop Fakin’ 3 — An Interview With Smalls

Photo by Kyle Myles

Words & Interview by Frozen in Carbonite and Recordings of Boardings

Pulaski, for connoisseurs of plaza skating, offers the most authentic experience left in North America. One is out in the open yet simultaneously in one’s own pocket of reality. The Capitol looms at the end of Pennsylvania Avenue, and the White House stands only a couple of blocks away. The locals know the color schemes of the different law enforcement vehicles that encircle the block and react accordingly. The sheer electricity of the overall experience blows away your local park, no matter how expansive or plaza-like.

Like I said here, the power resides in the marble.

D.C. videography dates back to Sheffey’s A Reason for Living part, but exploded onto the scene via Chris Hall’s New Deal parts and the first issues of 411. Dave Schubert’s camera and Giant Distribution’s willingness to feature their riders at the time offered skating writ large a window into an intimidating but mind-opening scene that overshadowed Love Park for most of the early nineties. In 2018, “east coast” is synonymous with wallrides ‘n shit, but Pulaski locals were just as tech if not moreso than their Embarcadero contemporaries.

In addition to producing generations of rippers, Pulaski has produced as extensive a library of independent scene vids as anywhere — back to True Mathematics’ Prosperity², to the seminal Pitcrew (R.I.P) vid Where I’m From, to the turn-of-the-century classic Pack a Lunch. As computer technology facilitated D.I.Y. video production, more essential documents emerged. Along those lines, we recently caught up with Smalls, the dude behind the longest-standing D.C. video series, to discuss Stop Fakin’ 3 — the third in the trilogy of the same name — and the culture of one of the most prolific scenes in the world.

You can purchase Stop Fakin’ 3 along with the whole trilogy here.

Keep Reading »