Fashion Is Only Data — Dime Comp Volume 6

Much has changed since we last compiled the best moments from skateboarding’s leading thinktank. Hugo is pro, Bryan is so busy that he doesn’t have a single appearance in Volume 6, and only time will tell how the people who were put off by the idea an overseas skate trip for the sole purpose of filming for Instagram Stories will feel about Dime’s TikTok page.

While we all wait for the wide release of their full-length video that premiered back in late September, these fifteen minutes from the past year-plus of Dime (and Dime-affiliated) Insta videos should hold you over.

Brought to you by NoFearSkate.co.uk and Thai Express ♥

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OHHHHHHH YYYEEEEAAAAAHHHH — Dime Comp. Volume 5, An Alexis Lacroix Special Edition

Photo by Eric Palozzolo

In all honesty, we’ve been hoarding the idea of an all-Alexis Dime Comp for years — ultimately to accompany an interview with the OHHHHH YYYYYEAAAAAHHHH spokesman that we never ended up getting around to. (Pro tip to all aspiring content creators: The Dime Glory Challenge is not the most optimal event to try and accomplish #skate #journalism at.) Then, Skate Jawn beat us to it.

Now is as good a time as any to remind you that speed is an illusion.

OHHHHH YYYYYEAAAAAHHHH.

Previous Dime Comps: 420, three, two, one

‘That’s Not Worth Filming’ — Dime Comp Volume 420

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Dime’s affluence over the past year has given rise to several developments. 1) They’re opening a store in Montreal on Saturday (depicted above.) They’ll carry their line, in addition to hardgoods, Quartersnacks merch and chill stuff from other chill companies. Proud of you boys. 2) They command a wider-reaching influence that has catapulted Jamal Smith into internet infamy yet again, made bowling edge out tennis as skaters’ peripheral sporting obsession, and the #dimechallenge to be undertaken in regions far outside French Canadia. 3) When you catch checks, you catch flights, and those flights have resulted in side-eyes from Swedish filmmakers.

Phil only carries the VX around for exercise, so here’s everything from the past year or so that was just for Instagram ;)

Previous Dime Comps: Three, two, one

Also, how could we forget…

Octane & Chill — Dime Comp Volume 3

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Illustration via Charles Rivard, PhD.

It has been a long three years since the release of Turd Season. In that time, the minds behind Dime have created an unprecedented beast of brilliance — thanks in no small part to an ability to stuff sublime moments spent on skateboards into fifteen second IG videos better than any of their peers. With this week’s announcement that their upcoming project would be premiering at the end of April (no doubt overshadowing the other piece of awaited Canadian culture set to drop that weekend), we condensed the past ten months worth of Dime Instagram videos (everything since the controversial release of “Dime Comp Volume 2”) into a 14-minute compilation.

We’ve never traveled further than the skate from Tompkins to Sunshine for a video premiere before, let alone booked airfare to one. Hope to see everyone at this one. Flyer here. Video plays at 2:59 A.M.

Previously: An Interview With Bryan From Dime, What is Dime?

An Interview With Bryan From Dime

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There are many unsung heroes in skateboarding. Local legends who never made it outside of their towns, skatepark builders who cede individual credit for the greater good, rogue bartenders who turn a blind eye to underage drinking at #skate #events are among them. But there’s one member of the skateboard family who truly never receives any credit: the warehouse guy. Where would Nyjah Houston be if not for the guy who physically takes his skateboards and Monster Energy memorabilia, and ships the box to him? Looking for a plank to drill eight holes into?

To give a glimpse of the skateboard-brand stock world, we hit up our Canadian friends at Dime, so they could grant us access to their always reliable and always smiling warehouse manager, Bryan.

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Tell us a bit about yourself Bryan. Where are you from? What was your upbringing like?

Hi, my name is Bryan. As Dime’s warehouse manager, I am a vital part of their supply chain process. I manage people, systems and make sure productivity targets are met. My goal is to make our customers happy. I love going out of my way to please strangers! I grew up in a small town called Kitchener, in Ontario, on a farm, as the only son of two very loving parents. My parents raised me to be a productive & happy person.

Did you always have a passion for stock? When did you first fall in love with packing boxes?

Growing up on a farm, I was always surrounded by little animals — cats, dogs, little chickens, & other meat products. Putting them in boxes really was a great source of pleasure for a young packer. Later, my love of packing evolved into packing more important things.

I believe the experience your customer receives when they order product from you should be flawless. If they ordered a size medium Dime Classic Tee, they should receive a medium size Dime Classic Tee. That is why I have developed the Dime Packaging Best Practices guide, as a tool that my team and I use to establish consistent packaging standards. By following these practices, I minimize cost and prevent delays, errors and damages. Failure to follow carton weight, size, or corrugated requirements could result in lost or damaged merchandise, delays, or additional charges and we’re not having any of that bullshit at Dime.

When did you move to Montreal? How did you come to work at Dime?

It was 2014, I was at a point in my life where I had to make some changes. Kitchener, being the hate crime capital of Canada, was a really negative environment and it forced me to make a choice. I moved to Montreal with my friend Jim, with hopes of a new beginning. We found our answer in the church [of Scientology]. I cannot overstate the value of Scientology’s teachings. We met the Dime guys at a “Cause of Suppression” class. They gave us a chance and hooked us up with entry level warehouse jobs at Dime. Through hard work and dedication, I climbed the corporate ladder and landed the warehouse manager position. Unfortunately, I had to fire Jim due to his alcoholism.

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