So Cold as Siberiaaaaa-a-a

January 27th, 2014 | 5:02 am | Daily News | 3 Comments

qs riri wall boards

The #1 and #2 most relevant wall boards of all-time. Photo by Pad Dowd.

“What’s the whitest trick in skateboarding?” “Snowboarding.”

Domestics Clothing is now being distributed in the U.K. by the crew at Wayward Gallery. They have a new promo out featuring Torey Goodall, Fred Gall, Quim Cardona and others. T has a sick 180 switch crook ender in some Light Ass Denim™, so you know he’s getting money. (See also: Ishod in Chronicles 2.)

Billy Rohan on Harold Hunter’s Mixtape part. “At least I went pro, you only went flow.”

It seems like the next generation of skate videos is going to be pretty Tumblr, huh?

Speaking of Tumblr: some (photographic) highlights from Olson’s Thrasher interview.

Another five-minute round of leftovers from the Spam video.

No complys are officially trending in New Jersey.

Honestly, the the image of Three Up Three Down and the idea of girls jogging past it in 70-degree weather is the only thing keeping the Quartersnacks office going right now. Until then, here’s video blog #205 from Johnny Wilson and friends.

Kingpin magazine has given in to the #listicle-ized / ad dollar maximizing direction of the internet, and offered a list that is relevant to the interests of this website: The Top Ten Euro Tech Parts. Though we’re partial to Enrique Lorenzo’s L.A. County part as his best offering (#musicsupervision, among other things), the list notably points us in the direction of his under-appreciated Logic part.

Another new Bolts 4-5-6 clip with Chris Lingat.

The Berrics spent last week putting out New York-related content, which will all be of varying interest to you.

How appropriate is it that Brian Wenning’s Lockdown Skateboards is the only enterprise still releasing footage from Staten Island’s ABC ledges? Also, did they get sandblasted or something? They look newer than they did in 2003.

The PFP3 video is premiering at the 2nd Nature Skatepark on Saturday. Promo here.

Non skate-related link alert! If you’re one of those people that complains about rap and uses annoying phrases like “the state of hip-hop,” NPR (yeah, seriously…) recently released two interviews — one with Bun B and the other with Starlito and Don Trip — that are more interesting than any conception of an “interview with a rapper” has the right to be (i.e. they go far beyond typical rapper interview “get this money”-isms.) Listen to them and shut up. Thanks.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Carmelo’s 62. Please, everybody, don’t let this fool you into thinking this team is elevating anywhere beyond a first-round playoff out (with a losing record) this year, or any other year as long as Dolan owns them.

Quote of the Week (cannot remember who this interaction was between, sorry.)
“I met your ex’s new man the other night.”
“Yeah, he has a great backside tailslide.”

Having a tough time figuring out what stance Bieber is

The 30 Phattest Outfits in Skate Video History: 1992-2012

September 6th, 2012 | 12:56 pm | Features & Interviews | 97 Comments

Happy fall fashion week. We hope that you are fashion-forward during these next several days, and wish you the best of luck in sparking a brief romance with a lonely stylist’s assistant before the week is out.

In honor of this most festive of weeks, we have compiled a somewhat comprehensive guide to the best gear from the past twenty years’ worth of skate videos. Skateboarding didn’t just begin “embracing fashion,” as some misinformed outfits have recently reported. Fashion has been stealing shit from skaters for years. (Luckily, they left Javier Nunez’s City Stars jeans alone.) Here’s the proof: All the jerseys, sweats, camo, braids, insane patches, sweater vests and swooshy pants that you could ever hope for. Yes, there are omissions. No, it isn’t in order. Thanks to Roctakon, Boss Bauer, Sweet Waste, Jack Sabback and Jason from Frozen in Carbonite for their contributions to this post.

The Zoo York Institute of Design

May 31st, 2012 | 10:11 am | Time Capsule | 16 Comments

In the introduction to his interview with Zered Bassett, Chris Nieratko details how Zoo York was once a source of pride for east coast skaters. A few buyouts and a decade later, nobody sets up a Zoo board with a geographic bias in mind anymore. Even if the company completely phases out of skating, people will forever nerd out over their first three videos (Mixtape, at this point, is just as much of a hip-hop classic a la Wild Style or Style Wars as a classic skate video), and chances are, most who began skating after Zoo ceased being any sort of an east coast status symbol have seen those videos and cried about how all the spots are gone.

You can’t type “zoo york ads” into a Vimeo search bar and get any results, so a lot of younger kids won’t see the old Zoo ads. (They probably won’t see the new ones either…do kids still look at magazines?) Those ads are just as full of classic nineties east coast iconography as the original videos.

The Zoo ads throughout the nineties were “MAD HIP-HOP YO,” at a time when that meant more than leaving comments about how Lil’ Wayne sucks on every pre-2000 rap video’s YouTube page. Other companies even jocked their whole hip-hop scrapbook vibe when it was appropriate: Transworld styled article layouts for east coast skaters with Zoo’s look (see here), west coast companies would run Zoo-esque ads for their east coast riders (see here and here), and start-up east coast brands like Illuminati, Metropolitan, and Capital all had a bit of Zoo DNA in their ads. It’s unfortunate that now, even when paired with a sick photo, Zoo ads look pretty generic.

Thanks to the internet’s leading scanner-based skate sites, we gathered a handful of ads from 1994-2000 into one place. The scans are stolen from The Chrome Ball Incident, Police Informer, and Skate.ly.

The Back of Union

October 20th, 2011 | 9:44 am | Time Capsule | 1 Comment

NY Skateboarding posted the exact same clips yesterday, so please pardon any redundancy.

Falling in line with other archival treasures that surfaced earlier this year, here are two great lifestyle-ish skate clips featuring Harold Hunter, Rodney Torres, Steve Rodriguez, and others. They cover a wide array of nostalgia points: excellent sneaker choices that would be seen as “retro” should they be worn today, the swooshy Adidas track pants that the 90s were quite fond of, a fence-lacking Banks wall, the original “Back of Union,” and perhaps most notable for those who enjoy making their lungs black, a $2.35 price-tag on a pack of cigarettes. It is also good to know that Rodney was capable of 360 flip lipsliding a handrail fifteen-years ago. Can’t say anyone should be nostalgic for skating in Northface jackets with snow on the ground though…

Check out Manolo’s channel on YouTube for more clips. (Not to be confused with the guy who does all the re-edits.) There’s almost seventy of them and they cover about fifteen years of footage.

A Comprehensive Guide to Rap Video Skate Parts

May 20th, 2011 | 10:03 am | Features & Interviews | 35 Comments

It seems that whenever Jereme Rogers releases one of his “rap songs,” conventional skateboard media outlets continue to grant him exposure. These videos usually draw the ire of those nostalgic for the Coliseum era, when Jereme was switch flipping stairs to Buena Vista Social Club. Even non-skate related circles have given his frequent masterworks of second hand embarrassment some contemplation. We’re all guilty of (well, not Quartersnacks…not until this post anyway) offering Jereme airtime, instead of ignoring him in hopes that he would simply disappear or get committed. He, like many other inadequate rappers, subscribes to the fallacy that equates having “haters” to success. The only way we could win is by not paying attention.

However, his recent rap videos and audition tapes for a potential sequel to Whiteboyz are not the first instances of skateboarders attempting to mesh themselves with the mystic world of rap music. The following is a (cautionary) guide to the occasional rap video skate part, and why it has typically been a bad idea, long before Jereme Rogers made us wonder if he bumped his head too hard when he fell off the mattress in Wonderful Horrible Life.