Links From the BBQ

Scott Johnston at the building across from the New York Stock Exchange. Sometime in the nineties.

Monday links on a Tuesday…

The rumor mill about Zoo York phasing out of skateboarding has been building for quite some time, but it’s finally official. Zered Bassett explains what happened, and why everyone except pretty much Brandon Westgate is now off the team. (Black Dave, Kevin Tierney, and the AMs are all still on.)

The team at Live Skateboard Media remixed Lucas Puig’s Transworld pro spotlight part (the part that brought back the noseslide) by throwing in rap music, Biggie interviews, those ever-so-popular VHS glitch effects, etc. Better than the original, though not the French Montana x French Mariano part we all envisioned.

On Memorial Day, the Green Diamond put together a tribute clip to Slappy Cove.

Random Flip Cam footage from the Flipmode Squad riding around Queens and occasionally skateboarding.

Some kids take the PATH train into the city, skate 75% of the spots between 110th and 140th, edit it to ASAP Rocky, and upload it to YouTube.

You know those waxed concrete triangular banks that were across the street from the Brooklyn Banks at the Verizon Building? Well, they tore them all out, except for the one at the end.

Rick Ross publicly stated that he had $10,000 for anyone who ran across the court during a Heat Finals game (sorry Boston fans, but you guys are just as insane as the overly optimistic Knicks fans from four weeks ago if you think you have a shot) wearing nothing but a MMG shirt. Some dude did it during a second round playoff game, got arrested, charged, held on $6,500 bond, and didn’t even get his money, presumably because he didn’t read the part about it needing to be a Finals game.

Quote of the Week:


Get some work done this week. Have a good one.

The Events That Defined New York City Skateboarding in 2010: 15-11

Took a week off from the countdown, sorry. There will probably be two of these posts this week. Moving on with the retrospective…#25-21, #20-16.

15. The Dipset Reunion

It is no secret that video part song choices are crucial to developing musical preferences of all those who have grown up on skate videos. From the punk rock of the 1980s, to the indie shit that accompanies any emotional “skating is an art, bro” video of today, skateboarding has a much closer tie-in with music than traditional sports, whose typical soundtrack ranges from “Kernkraft 400” to “I Like To Move It Move It.” If you came of age in the early 2000s, the impact of Dipset, and its days of making era-defining opuses of ignorance, cannot be understated. The reunion was a beacon of hope for all of those who miss the magic that defined early-to-mid-2000s skateboarding — when the internet, skate plazas, reality shows, and awful rap dynasties were not a part of the cultural landscape. The reunion was also a chance for New York rap to get another shot at the previous-decade-dominating rap comeback, as Wu-Tang’s return in the 2000s was hardly worth the attention it was given.

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