‘A Certain Amount Of Suffering’ — An Interview With Anthony Van Engelen

Interview by Farran Golding
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photography by Anthony Acosta

The amount of people who have been able to pull off skate careers spanning over two decades is low. And in the skateboard-content-creation biz, we often fall on this assumption that these skaters have answered all the questions already, e.g. what can you truly unpack that Chromeball hasn’t?

But that’s false. Because the reason this group has been able to endure through the years is their prolific adaptability. The perspective of someone at the start of their third decade of a skate career is even different than it was when they were headed toward the latter half of decade two.

With A.V.E. on the horn for the “Favorite Spot” segment (thanks everybody for the kind feedback, by the way), not digging a bit deeper felt like a missed opportunity. Farran spoke to him on where his perspective on this thing called “professional skateboarding” stands today, entrenched in the third decade of doing it.

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Dreamer — An Interview With Jahmal Williams

Intro & Interview by Adam Abada
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photos by Cole Giordano & Pep Kim

Jahmal Williams is as humble as he is effortlessly flowing on his skateboard. He is someone with thoughtful personal aesthetics that you could never mistake for pretension. That translates into his effects on skate culture — one that he has been a part of for many decades now. A painter, sculptor and connoisseur of 180 nosegrinds, Jahmal is also a father and runs his own cult favorite brand, Hopps.

“Keep It Moving” isn’t only Hopps’ slogan, but a philosophy that keeps Jahmal relevant and creating great work. With a mind and personal history that exemplifies striking while the iron is hot, Jahmal’s new mural and accompanying short is the type of pandemic-era work that reveals how constantly evolving he is.

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Five Favorite Parts With Chris Jones

Intro + Interview by Farran Golding
Collage by Requiem For A Screen
Portrait by Reece Leung
Backside Flip Photo by Sam Ashley

Chris Jones began to make an impression on the U.K. scene during the mid-to-late-2000s with an appearance in a promo for Crayon Skateboards. Moving to London from Bristol after graduating university (and having met Jacob Harris on a trip while studying), his part in Eleventh Hour – coupled with a place on the upstart Isle team — positioned Chris as one in a new generation of household names for British skateboarding alongside Harris and his co-star, Tom Knox. Vase came two years later, bringing wide acclaim for all involved, which Chris doubled down on via Colin Read’s Spirit Quest before properly wading into international waters with “Atlantic Drift” crew.

Struggling to narrow down twenty years of video consumption into five, Chris opted to hone in on a handful from his formative years growing up in the small Welsh village of Coychurch.

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‘The Fundamentals Of Skating Are In A Video Part’ – An Interview With Gilbert Crockett

Interview & Video Edit by Farran Golding
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photography by Anthony Acosta

Even in the avalanche of daily skate videos, you can always distinguish the parts that had a little more tact put behind them from the ones that are footage dumps. Gilbert Crockett has been releasing thoughtful video parts for over a decade — many of which are largely filmed in his hometown of Richmond, Virginia by childhood friend, Will Rosenstock — and all of them are distinguishable from one another.

Having just opened up Greg Hunt’s Alright Ok for skateboarding’s de facto Oscars season, we had Farran reach out to Gilbert to speak on his process, and how it all works, often without having to go very far.

We also have a special bonus video of Gilbert’s footage from SunTrust and the surrounding downtown Richmond spots with commentary, all courtesy of Will’s archive ♥

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‘My Role Is To Show That It’s Magical’ – An Interview With Lucas Puig

Intro & Interviews by Farran Golding
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photography by Sem Rubio

Beyond Lucas Puig’s reputation as the quintessential European who “made it,” his sponsor history alone weaves his name into the skateboard culture of not only France and America – but also England, China and however many other countries in which he’s filmed video parts.

Born and raised in Toulouse, France, and traveling from a young age, Lucas had no desire to live elsewhere for some time. “I felt like I needed to be home,” he says of the gaps between skate trips. “That’s why I never moved to Paris or another big city.”

Five years ago, however, he relocated to the small Basque town of Biarritz. “We came here to be close to the beach,” Lucas says over the phone one morning. “For me, it was for surfing and for my girlfriend, it was for a different lifestyle. More chilled and less subways, less people. Just taking our time.”

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