Mulberry Street’s Waviest

WAVY MIKE

“Yo, you got a cat man? Is it wavy too?” — Wavy Mike. Quartersnacks Yemen tour coming soon.

If you haven’t already seen Eli Reed’s X-Games “Real Street” part, you should give it a few rewinds. The FedEx ollie is a bit crazier than any footage would lead someone who hasn’t been there to believe. Eli might be the best switch skater out right now, and king of the Alligator Ledge.

Uploaded Jahmal Williams’ tricks from Welcome to M.I.A. to YouTube for the sake of having easy access to the part. The Houston Street footage is great. There’s nothing wrong with a long backside boardslide on a row of Jersey barriers, or still bringing Eastern Exposure spot sensibilities to 2011. The video has been out for a while now, but if it’s not on your shelf yet, purchase it over on MIAskateshop.com.

While on the topic of Jersey barriers, Bushwick Will posted a story about stealing Triton barriers in response to the great parking block heist of 2011. It should persuade any impulsive skateboarder to better assess the consequences when obtaining (presumably useless) objects for makeshift, D.I.Y., etc. spots. (Still do it, just plan it out better.)

Coda Skateboards’ new promo/video, Slappy Hour, will premiere at KCDC tomorrow (06/21) at 7 P.M.. Features new parts from Connor Fay and Jerry Mraz. Trailer here.

Vote for the Familia Skateshop / Flow Trash crew in Nike’s upcoming “Chosen” competition. Davis Torgerson came out of that camp, but there are a whole bunch of dudes all the way up in Minnesota that rip just as hard.

This photo of Bogdan Dzyurak at Columbus Park is pretty sick. Similar to Eli’s aforementioned FedEx ollie, it’s another instance of documentation never being able to relay the sketchiness of the spot, in addition to the decades of urine waiting in that corner if you happen to bail on the trick.

Much like skateboarders should stop decreasing their life expectancy by taking $5 Chinatown buses, you guys should also stop moving into sketchy “artists’ lofts” in Bushwick. Unless you’re cool with ending up homeless, or moving back to wherever you’re from.

Random footage bits: Goin’ Ham outtakes, Bill Pierce commercial for Roger Skateboards

Skate video news: The Vans video will be out sometime between next week and 2020. That means Little Alex has like five or six parts to film now. Not Another Transworld Video will be out on DVD tomorrow. Short Review = Theotis and Mike Anderson have the best parts. Long Review = Click here.

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The Events That Defined New York City Skateboarding in 2010: 10-6

Slightly behind schedule, but down to the final ten… #25-21, #20-16, #15-11.

10. The rise in popularity and subsequent banning of Four Loko

The lifeblood of New York skateboarding has always been diluted with alcohol. When sizing up the abilities of skateboarders in this city, is it important to not merely assess tricks, but the social environment within which these tricks are accomplished. It is not what tricks you can do, but what tricks you can do after waking up at 5 P.M. with half of a six pack you purchased at 4:48 in the morning still in your fridge, a pounding headache, and your friend-who-used-to-skate’s unread mass text about his acquisition of a bottle in six hours. Film a part amongst this madness (or avoid it altogether), and you will be ranked among the greats. If you falter, well, you’re just like the rest of them.

This dependence on alcohol is not comical, or tangential by any means, and it all begins with one simple exposure. For the pre-internet nineties, it was the frequent sight of the 40 ounce bottle in Kids that told youngsters what to drink. In the early-2000s, half of the under-eighteen contingent that would skate flat in the back of Union Square past 10 P.M. was introduced to alcohol through Sparks. And even further down the line, the 2008 opening of Trader Joe’s on 14th Street brought forth the availability of $2 wine for a whole slew of younger degenerates, bringing new relevance to the otherwise outdated term, “wine-o.” But 2010 was hit hard with the youth-marketed Four Loko beverages, which fueled this past summer with relentless forays into bad decisions, and can now be found on Craigslist for $10 a can.

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Ham Sandwiches and Skateboard Wheels

If you’re in the handful of individuals reading this right now with a headache, just out of a sleep marred by alcohol, at least you have a solid, new skateboard video to distract you for seventeen minutes.

Goin’ Ham is a project by the same crew that brought you the Film Me video, released this past summer. There are full parts from Nate Rojas, Ray Macken, and Stephan Martinez. It’s tightly edited, fast-paced, and an all around thorough watch. Right now, it is being downloaded from Vimeo and converted to a .m4v format so it can play off a phone. That hasn’t happened with a new video in a fairly long time. (Well, not since August 22nd.)

A real stand-out part of the video is the immense array of local terrain that it covers. While any bum on wheels flying into New York from Burbank, Europe, or Australia for a few weeks in the summer could have kickflipped the Fifth Avenue Apple Store ledge to street gap, or front crooked the CBS eight-stair rail at this point, given how far skateboarding has come in the past ten years, these kids actually made it happen. It’s easy to drive out of state to find better versions of basically every New York spot, but making do with the whole city and its myriad of pretty, but endlessly flawed skate spots is a whole different story. It’s like 1999 or 2000 all over again (except with much better skateboarding), where tricks go down all over the place, not just within the same routine boundaries that have become guidelines for where to film these past couple years. Lines at CBS in 2010 are something to genuinely be psyched on, and it gives everyone a reason to break out the wax and re-energize some spot that we have been neglecting for years.

As with the also great Film Me video, certain critical corners of the Tompkins bench might write it off for “little kid style,” or other similar deterrents that exist for the aging skateboarder population of New York. The truth is, between this and the last video, there has been less than a year’s span, and every single person’s part is a notch above the last one (and some of them have been visibly affected by growth spurts.) The video goes hard, and the third one will undoubtedly be on a different level. Parts with residual little kid style, but sprinkled with evident motivation, are always more fun to watch than half-assed pursuits at video parts that are filmed in between brunch and happy hour.

Mildly related: If anyone had seen even half of the things that have gone down in the Ziegfeld fountain that we have seen, it would inevitably lead to a second thought before neglecting the potential health risks that reside on the opposite end of any comic endeavor involving contact with its contents.

Update: You can download a .m4v of the video here for iPhones and iPods.