Snow Day Viewing: Off the Braxx

snow day viewing

This video premiered yesterday (why does it seem like there has been a video premiere every three days for the past three months?) and is online today to keep your mind off the weather.

After putting out two videos in one year, the Film Me and Goin’ Ham crew took a few years to come back with Off the Braxx. Its vibe is similar to the past two projects, except all these kids are way better at skating now, and the short kid who was really good is now taller and even more good. Some of the rails they skate, specifically in Nate Rojas and Dylan Witkins’ part, are probably NBDs on a skateboard. The one that leads to the underground mall at the start of Water Street is nuts. Parts from Dylan Witkin, Nate Rojas, Stephan Martinez, Andre Beverly, Jamel Marshall and others.

Off the Braxx likely has the highest volume of DJ Drama drops in a skate video to date, and even though we spent the latter portion of 2011 assuming that someone would skate to a song from Drive, is Nate Rojas actually the first one to do it?

From Seattle to Pink Houses

Have you seen the forecast for Tuesday night into Wednesday yet? Seven to twelve inches overall. Should be fun.

Film Me, the summer 2010 video that came before Goin’ Ham’ from the same crew, is available in its full forty-minute form on Vimeo.

Some real nineties-looking footage. The video says it’s from 1993-1994, or “around the time when people started skating switch.” You can see the barren asphalt wasteland that Battery Park City was prior to the completion of construction some years later, The Humps (or at least the spot I think was The Humps), and the nineties version of Midtown.

The final update from the Autumn Bowl. It’s been a wrap for a minute now, but just in case you wanted visual proof of its final state. Here’s a clip from the final two days as well. But according to Forrest Edwards, “It’s not like you get paid a million dollars to skate transition.”

This Keith Hufnagel-channeling clip of Zach Moore is about a year old, but a solid watch largely due to to the speed with which he skates through things.

Mama’s Boys is an upcoming local video that has a Loose Trucks Max part, you can watch the promo here, and a few New York-set throwaway clips here.

The nollie off the hip to boardslide down the rail in Pat Gallaher and Jack Olson’s shared part in the Flow Trash video is pretty official.

As a follow up to our new street plazas post from November…there’s a new street gap on Maiden Lane down the hill from C.I.A. (foot and a half high ledge over seven or eight feet of sidewalk into the street), and the new Grace Ledge is black marble, over four stairs, and lower (although still closed off for construction.)

Quote of the Week:Yo Dre, what are you doing?” — Inquisitive Gentleman
I have been sitting here watching the ‘Ride’ video for hours and don’t feel like I have wasted a second of my day.” — Andre Page

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The Events That Defined New York City Skateboarding in 2010: 10-6

Slightly behind schedule, but down to the final ten… #25-21, #20-16, #15-11.

10. The rise in popularity and subsequent banning of Four Loko

The lifeblood of New York skateboarding has always been diluted with alcohol. When sizing up the abilities of skateboarders in this city, is it important to not merely assess tricks, but the social environment within which these tricks are accomplished. It is not what tricks you can do, but what tricks you can do after waking up at 5 P.M. with half of a six pack you purchased at 4:48 in the morning still in your fridge, a pounding headache, and your friend-who-used-to-skate’s unread mass text about his acquisition of a bottle in six hours. Film a part amongst this madness (or avoid it altogether), and you will be ranked among the greats. If you falter, well, you’re just like the rest of them.

This dependence on alcohol is not comical, or tangential by any means, and it all begins with one simple exposure. For the pre-internet nineties, it was the frequent sight of the 40 ounce bottle in Kids that told youngsters what to drink. In the early-2000s, half of the under-eighteen contingent that would skate flat in the back of Union Square past 10 P.M. was introduced to alcohol through Sparks. And even further down the line, the 2008 opening of Trader Joe’s on 14th Street brought forth the availability of $2 wine for a whole slew of younger degenerates, bringing new relevance to the otherwise outdated term, “wine-o.” But 2010 was hit hard with the youth-marketed Four Loko beverages, which fueled this past summer with relentless forays into bad decisions, and can now be found on Craigslist for $10 a can.

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Ham Sandwiches and Skateboard Wheels

If you’re in the handful of individuals reading this right now with a headache, just out of a sleep marred by alcohol, at least you have a solid, new skateboard video to distract you for seventeen minutes.

Goin’ Ham is a project by the same crew that brought you the Film Me video, released this past summer. There are full parts from Nate Rojas, Ray Macken, and Stephan Martinez. It’s tightly edited, fast-paced, and an all around thorough watch. Right now, it is being downloaded from Vimeo and converted to a .m4v format so it can play off a phone. That hasn’t happened with a new video in a fairly long time. (Well, not since August 22nd.)

A real stand-out part of the video is the immense array of local terrain that it covers. While any bum on wheels flying into New York from Burbank, Europe, or Australia for a few weeks in the summer could have kickflipped the Fifth Avenue Apple Store ledge to street gap, or front crooked the CBS eight-stair rail at this point, given how far skateboarding has come in the past ten years, these kids actually made it happen. It’s easy to drive out of state to find better versions of basically every New York spot, but making do with the whole city and its myriad of pretty, but endlessly flawed skate spots is a whole different story. It’s like 1999 or 2000 all over again (except with much better skateboarding), where tricks go down all over the place, not just within the same routine boundaries that have become guidelines for where to film these past couple years. Lines at CBS in 2010 are something to genuinely be psyched on, and it gives everyone a reason to break out the wax and re-energize some spot that we have been neglecting for years.

As with the also great Film Me video, certain critical corners of the Tompkins bench might write it off for “little kid style,” or other similar deterrents that exist for the aging skateboarder population of New York. The truth is, between this and the last video, there has been less than a year’s span, and every single person’s part is a notch above the last one (and some of them have been visibly affected by growth spurts.) The video goes hard, and the third one will undoubtedly be on a different level. Parts with residual little kid style, but sprinkled with evident motivation, are always more fun to watch than half-assed pursuits at video parts that are filmed in between brunch and happy hour.

Mildly related: If anyone had seen even half of the things that have gone down in the Ziegfeld fountain that we have seen, it would inevitably lead to a second thought before neglecting the potential health risks that reside on the opposite end of any comic endeavor involving contact with its contents.

Update: You can download a .m4v of the video here for iPhones and iPods.