‘A Place For The Nerds’ — An Interview With Nick Sharratt of The Palomino

Interview by Farran Golding
Photos by Chris Mann, Rafal Wojnowski & Rich West

As we age, it’s easy to only remember the “big” changes: VX to HD, social media, Thrasher becoming the only magazine. The smaller ones are tougher to catalog, but when you think about it, had a substantial impact. In the not-so-distant past, “raw files” weren’t a “thing.” You couldn’t DM on Instagram. Polar was a small brand selling outline logo tees to the few who could get them. These things changing had huge reverberations, and in many ways, helped make “underground,” independent skateboard brands the dominant brands they are today.

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Life in the Slow Lane

Austyn Gillette by Andrew James Peters. 2011.

An interesting quarantine contest would be best rendition of Fred Gall’s phone call to Tony Hawk, which Boil the Ocean just transcribed for posterity purposes. That means comic book renderings, live action re-creations, claymation, anime, abstract art, whatever. Kinda like a skate version of The Simpsons “Steamed Hams” remixes. Yes? No? Do we call a Zoom meeting to figure out logistics?

“The only TV show I’ve been watching is FaceTime with Mitch B.” Will Marshall is the latest guest on The Bunt. Will has a tactful ability to almost *go there* but he never quite goes there, unless of course, you skate for Bones Wheels ♥

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Stuck On Earth

TWS interviewed a handful of pros and industry people about the effects of corona virus on the skate industry, as did Parade — except with a focus on small, independent skate brands (like QS!) The common theme between all of them is the resilience of skaters. Yes, shit is crazy right now, but skateboarding isn’t going anywhere once this is all over. The fact that Seattle is experiencing a slowdown in new cases (it was the first part of the country to get hit) is a tiny pinch of an indicator that social restrictions are working. Be safe, be patient, be supportive ♥ And while we know people go on QS to forget the noise of the outside world, if you want to read something COVID-19 related that’s responsibly reported and level-headed, this is the one.

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Quarantinesnacks

Pic via @rinyahata_ on IG

Threw the remaining bits of our fall 2019 release on sale in the webstore. Truthfully, it’s mostly beanies and smalls, but there are a few loose other sizes left in there. Figured now was a good time to clear this out as everyone adjusts to the slower pace of life while we wait for this shit to calm down — yes, skate shops are affected. We’ll be good though, just gotta ride it out and be smart. It’s not like we have another choice, yaknow? ♥ Everyone be clean, be safe, be nice and be patient. QS content resumes as usual, because you already know that fashion never sleeps :)

Skate videos used to be so cute and innocent.

All the Streets Are Silent: The Convergence of Hip-Hop and Skateboarding (1987-1997) is coming soon. Think about that Slam interview with Eli Gesner from last week, but wider in scope, and in documentary form. (Timely name, too!)

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Deeper Understanding — An Interview With Charlie Birch

Interview by Farran Golding
Collages by Requiem For A Screen
Original Photos by Marimo Ohyama & Alex Pires

It seems like just the other day that Palace was a small U.K. brand buzzing with montages filmed on VHS tapes, and P.W.B.C. news segments aimed at a skate industry still coming to grips with how to use the internet. In the ensuing decade of successes, it has remained unshakably English in its vision — even the fact that Jamal Smith is the only American to turn pro for the brand rings of a certain “foreigners appreciating your homeland in a better way than you do”-type thing.

To the American eye, Palace rose to prominence in that void left by Blueprint at the onset of the 2010s. In the time since, the world of U.K. skateboarding feels like it became closer intertwined to our own. This of course is thanks to Palace, yes, but also because of things like Isle’s unanimously adored “Atlantic Drift” series, the Yardsale videos, Free becoming one of the best alternate channels for skate media, and the inspiring success of the Long Live Southbank campaign.

With little context for how the U.K. scene actually operates, we asked Farran Golding — the man behind many of the deep-dive features on the Slam City Skates blog — to interview Charlie Birch, Palace’s newest teamrider, who we don’t know all that much about on this side of the Atlantic ;)

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