Orchard Skateshop Presents.. ‘EGG’

Words by Frozen in Carbonite
Filmed & Edited by Lee Madden

Last year, MIT scientist Andrew Sutherland helped solve an equation that had vexed the world’s premier mathemeticians for half a century: x³y³z³= k when k=42.

As this MIT news item states, “This sum of three cubes puzzle, first set in 1954 at the University of Cambridge and known as the Diophantine Equation x³y³z³=k, challenged mathematicians to find solutions for numbers 1-100. With smaller numbers, this type of equation is easier to solve: for example, 29 could be written as 3³+ 1³+ 1³, while 32 is unsolvable. All were eventually solved, or proved unsolvable, using various techniques and supercomputers, except for two numbers: 33 and 42.”

A mile or so up the Charles River, the elite ledge scientists of Boston use their own techniques to devise previously unimagined trick algorithms.

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The Ethos of the Forbidden 14 With Dana Ericson

Words & Interview by Frozen in Carbonite
Photo by Lee Madden

“A man must have a code.” — Omar Little and/or Bunk Moreland, The Wire (HBO, 2002-2008)

You might remember the Code of Hammurabi from 9th/10th grade world history or some shit. Long story short, it functioned as the first written code of law in the history of human civilization.

Four thousand years later, from a socio-anthropological perspective, skate spots — and more specifically, the almost-extinct inner city plaza spot — are mini-civilizations with their own dignitaries and codes.

Love Park — don’t push mongo. Embarcadero — don’t get in Mike or Henry’s way. Along those lines, Boston’s Eggs has developed its own code, a central component of which is the infamous “Forbidden 14.” When I first heard of it, it took me back to the days of vibing anyone that did a street grab or railslide. On the other hand, when you saw someone with a nose and tail worn down to the wood grain and a pristine graphic in between, you knew they weren’t fucking around.

When I referenced it here, a substantial amount of #engagement erupted in the QS comments section. So, we hit up Eggs local and Alltimers rider Dana Ericson to shed some light on one of Eggs’ most elusive and #controversial hidden codes.

For the culture.

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Frozen in Carbonite Presents — Song of the Summer x Video Part of the Summer 2017: The Summer of Angst

Words by Frozen in Carbonite

I turned 40 this summer. Eschewing a crazy-ass party, trip or any other type of midlife crisis-type behavior, I kept it mellow and went out to my local™ bar. Street skating over forty is unknown territory, but if you manage to stay fit, there’s what I call the Reggie Miller Effect: one’s physique remains essentially static, but one’s capabilities — whether because of reflexes or vision deteriorating — decline exponentially. It’s all about managing expectations. 360 flips might flip slower than in the past, but maybe one adds backside nosegrind reverts on small ledges to the repertoire. Other summer activities function in a similar manner; one might not be able to make it to OVO Fest, but maybe one could chill at one of those tiny New York hotel pools with a bag of tequila taped to one’s thigh.

This #frame gives one hope heading into the fall A.K.A. skate season. Indeed, while this may be the first S.O.T.S. x V.P.O.T.S. post without a part from an according-to-Hoyle physical release, at press time, we were still digesting the 917 and Traffic vids, plus anticipating the release of Sabotage 5. So with an eye towards hoody season, let’s take a look back at the songs and video parts that fueled summer ’17.

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A Dying Breed — The One Spot Part

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Photo: Cronan

A one-spot part was once a natural occurrence and a reflection of habit. Just as partying ate into the time we spent dedicated to night clips, a nationwide depletion of friendly plaza space pushed us into the crust. It now takes a concerted effort to film an entire part in [or mostly in] one place. On a week where we are mourning the loss of skateboarding’s most serendipitous crossroad with public space, let us not forget to celebrate the living.

By previous conservative definitions, Eggs wouldn’t have been considered a plaza. It’s in central Boston, but tucked away in central Boston; the nearest store is still a bit of skate away, rendering the “run, skate, chill, go to the store”-litmus test a fail. As center-city spots turned to memories over the last decade-and-a-half and our friends went searching for cellar doors, we had to widen the classification.

In 2016, Flushing’s a plaza, Third and Army is a plaza and Eggs is a plaza. We had to look past how far they were situated from sustenance. They had open space, they had a history and they had a culture.

Today, we celebrate Eggs with Gavin Nolan, via the lens of perhaps the most well-regarded one-spot part in skate video history. The rest is just a bonus reel. After all, how much actual footage of the subject was there in that 4:30 Reason part ;) ?

Filmed by R.B. Umali, Tom Gorelik, Evan Walsh & Elliott Vecchia. Also maybe the most boom-bap QS remix / clip ever, even though it has a guy from the Bay rapping on it :)

Via the East’s Most Advanced Ledge Skating Thinktank…

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Photo by Sean Cronan

Between PJ Ladd’s Wonderful Horrible Life, and this month’s unsolved mystery of a missing Plan B part, many Suffolk County-based skateboarders have learned to skate “some type of way.” The Coliseum video set off the previous decade (which actually ended after the release of Aesthetics’ Ryde of Ride video in 2001, not on December 31, 1999 at 11:59:59 P.M.), and the best relatively low-bust ledge spot on the eastern seaboard progressed it, allowing Boston to breed the closest northeastern counterpart to EuroTech™ (EggTech™ maybe, or something to that effect?)

Gavin sat on Plan B flow for years while sustaining on Clif bars and mini tangerines, until ultimately getting hooked up 4real by Zoo earlier this fall. Anyone who has been around for the past few summers in New York knows he’s one of the nicest, most consistent and simply down-to-skate-with-everyone dudes around, so it’s great to see him get some shine. There were quite a bit of extras from his lil welcome part, so we combined the two to a less boom bap-ified variant, along with the original footage.

Alternate YouTube Link

Filmed by R.B. Umali, Joeface Monteleone, Richard Quintero, Spanish Mike, Harry Corrigan, Elliott Vecchia & James Messina.