Trade Deadline

February 17th, 2014 | 5:45 am | Daily News | 7 Comments

noodles

Yoooooo, obvs we out, but summer on Friday 4real.

#Surfboard Vines had a good run, but they’re officially done. This guy won.

Holy switch hardflip. Anyone else feel tempted to go buy a pink crewneck now?

Even in winter, the most productive skate crew in New York is still putting out three-minute montages. Fashion goes in cycles, so it makes sense that people are skating Verizon Banks again, albeit between hundreds of knobs.

It’s awesome that Chrome Ball never really shut down; it still has better interviews than everywhere else. The latest post-faux-mortem installment is with Reese Forbes, one of the most frequent recipients of “You had to see him skate in real life to really get it“-honors. Also, these ads were great.

Before you get too nostalgic about the nineties…(BTW, Blind jeans are back.)

A new part from history’s most prolific half cab boardslider, Jersey Dave.

Any clip with a Z-Ro song in it gets an automatic post. Still waiting for someone to skate to this

“Snowboarders, like, see the world differently, dude.”

The new all-night, short sleeve heavy montage from the Haha Funtime crew is going to make you really sad about the state of outdoor activity right now.

New Albany-centric video from Jeremy Jordan and friends.

Still Scummin’ is a cool 40-minute bro cam video of Jersey dudes skating around known haunts of the New York region. Austin Kanfoush’s part did it justice, but it’s perfectly reasonable to use “Fuck That Shit” in every single skate video that gets put out for the remainder of skateboarding’s existence.

ICYMI: Just like Robocop (or something?), Traffic Skateboards got rebooted. They have a new montage out that features Luke Malaney footage :)

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Gotta be Waiters v.s. Hardaway J.R. in the rookie-sophomore game.

Quote of the Week: “I never thought switch skating was going to catch on. I’d tell people they’re better off investing their money in laser discs.” — Justin Barnes

metro boomin

Beanies are sold out until next winter. Thanks to anyone out there wearing one xoxo.

#TRENDWATCH2013: The Nineties

June 26th, 2013 | 2:07 pm | Daily News | 12 Comments

90s trendwatch

Really, are the nineties ever not trending? Whether someone is putting VHS effects on footage, technical wizardry that Peter Smolik is never properly credited for, or the legions of YouTube users asserting “this was when skating wuz real” on any pre-2000 part, the decade is never completely irrelevant. In recent times, lesser-known companies from the nineties have been finding their way back in skateboarding, though they remain unrelated to that decade’s proprietors.

EXHIBIT A: As a Connecticut native, Brian Anderson, head of the Skate Mental-affiliated start-up 3D Skateboards, must have been aware of the CT-based 3D Innovations in one way or another. But if you’re familiar with the past two months of Slap gossip, and happened to wake up in Copley Square circa 1994 tomorrow morning, things might be a bit confusing. The differences are obviously there. One has “Skateboards” after its name, the other has “Innovations.” One specializes in hard goods, the other in apparel. One is rumored to have one of skateboarding’s most exciting new rosters, the other is notable in that its video features rare documentation of Mike Graham. Provided the would-be roster is true, and add in the cult following behind Skate Mental’s art direction, 3D Skateboards is destined for a bright future. It’s just not the first time a Connecticut-born mind envisioned skateboarding products in the third dimension. The nineties are inescapable!

EXHIBIT B: Like Exhibit A, given New York’s status as the only place in America that French people aren’t bred to hate, someone involved with France’s Metropolitan Skateboards must have been aware of Metropolitan Wheel Co. If not, the three leading scanners on the skateboard internet made it a point to scan every ad from the Deluxe-distributed, New York-based company’s brief run. Metropolitan Skateboards had been around in some form prior to their 2013 relaunch (they were the company to turn Leo Valls pro before Magenta), but they likely got early word of the decade being especially prominent in this year’s #trendwatch, rightfully assuming it was the right market for a reboot.

Eric Koston NYC Cruiser Footage – Circa 1995

November 23rd, 2012 | 1:34 pm | Time Capsule | No Comments

To wrap up this mildly Girl/Chocolate themed week, here is a quick clip of Koston cruising around downtown circa 1995-ish, via the B-roll tapes from his Epicly Later’d series that came out earlier this year. Not much by way of actual “tricks,” just cruiser footage from the area around C.I.A. Ledge and the road that surrounded the Twin Towers (to the side of where the white stone benches were.) Thanks to Chris and the crew at VBS for sharing this with us. The audio is jacked in a few places, but you can deal with it. Have a good weekend.

Loosely Related (from two years earlier):

The Zoo York Institute of Design

May 31st, 2012 | 10:11 am | Time Capsule | 16 Comments

In the introduction to his interview with Zered Bassett, Chris Nieratko details how Zoo York was once a source of pride for east coast skaters. A few buyouts and a decade later, nobody sets up a Zoo board with a geographic bias in mind anymore. Even if the company completely phases out of skating, people will forever nerd out over their first three videos (Mixtape, at this point, is just as much of a hip-hop classic a la Wild Style or Style Wars as a classic skate video), and chances are, most who began skating after Zoo ceased being any sort of an east coast status symbol have seen those videos and cried about how all the spots are gone.

You can’t type “zoo york ads” into a Vimeo search bar and get any results, so a lot of younger kids won’t see the old Zoo ads. (They probably won’t see the new ones either…do kids still look at magazines?) Those ads are just as full of classic nineties east coast iconography as the original videos.

The Zoo ads throughout the nineties were “MAD HIP-HOP YO,” at a time when that meant more than leaving comments about how Lil’ Wayne sucks on every pre-2000 rap video’s YouTube page. Other companies even jocked their whole hip-hop scrapbook vibe when it was appropriate: Transworld styled article layouts for east coast skaters with Zoo’s look (see here), west coast companies would run Zoo-esque ads for their east coast riders (see here and here), and start-up east coast brands like Illuminati, Metropolitan, and Capital all had a bit of Zoo DNA in their ads. It’s unfortunate that now, even when paired with a sick photo, Zoo ads look pretty generic.

Thanks to the internet’s leading scanner-based skate sites, we gathered a handful of ads from 1994-2000 into one place. The scans are stolen from The Chrome Ball Incident, Police Informer, and Skate.ly.

Scanner File: Huf, Pang, Ponte, Steve R., Jones Keefe

February 22nd, 2012 | 10:18 am | Time Capsule | 8 Comments

Once The Chrome Ball Incident came around and monopolized the scanner-based skate site game, posts of old magazine scans became somewhat unnecessary. That’s why there hasn’t been one since November 2010. But after watching those R.B. Umali “Shoot All Skaters” episodes, it’s hard not to get nostalgic for more nineties east coast images, so we dug into a stack of old magazines to look for things that the internet’s leading skate magazine scanners have yet to unearth. Special thanks goes to Alex Dymond, as he donated the stack of mags depicted above, which included an October 1998 copy of The Source (ATCQ break-up issue.)

The following five interviews are from Fridge, which was an occasionally free magazine from the late-nineties. Its content was maybe 40% skateboarding (often east coast-centric), 20% snowboarding, 35% music, and 5% other stuff. It’s amazing that just ten years ago, people actually put money into *printing* magazines based on somewhat inconsistent interests. There was somehow an audience for a magazine that would interview Keith Hufnagel and Larry Holmes, provide a guide to shitty craft beers and snowboard boots, and review Less Than Jake, Björk and M.O.P. albums alongside one another all in the same issue (which, by the way, literally had a clown on the cover.) Nowadays, if you want to talk about, say, skateboarding, the Knicks, Atlanta rap, a concrete baseball diamond in the East Village, and a bunch of rich girl hangouts on the westside of Manhattan in one place, you pay $10 for a domain name and start a website.

Police Informer Blogspot R.I.P. Shout to the Skate.ly ad archive. All images are enlargeable.