Grind Like That To Shine Like This

February 5th, 2018 | 4:47 am | Daily News | 1 Comment

Diagram via Charles Rivard, PhD

It was this damnass rock.”

Vert God’s Stop Fakin’ 3 part drops on QS tomorrow

Birdgang 3 is now online *airhorn*

The Bloby videos are still the QS office’s favorite thing going. “Zdroopy,” their new one, is magic. Vince’s front nose 270 out is pure beauty, Karl Salah’s lines are always poetry, and DREWWWWWWW, Franco + Daniel Kim have cameos. No Hjalte tho :(

And the Pop boys also came through with a rad Paris edit that a) avoids a lot of the city’s most oft-skated spots, and b) oddly features a ton of underground footy ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Jenkem has a great interview with Tyshawn Jones.

…and Skateboard Story has an interview with Calzone maker, Matt Velez.

This is a mega Boil the Ocean post: reflecting on 28 years of Thrasher S.O.T.Y winners…in the bizarro world, where Penny won in ’95, and Tiago won in ’17, etc.

Good bit of new Caddo footage in the friends section of Valenti’s N.Y. Archive project.

So this is the spot Rick Howard would’ve found if he kept skating around the forest after he bumped his head in Mouse.

Our dear friends at Seasons dropped new video over the weekend. That Empire State Plaza spot is lowkey one of the best spots on the east coast now that it’s a go.

I saw a video labeled “Patrik Wallner” and “The Lost Continent,” and my first thought was “damn, these dudes deadass went to Antarctica on a skate trip didn’t they.” They didn’t, but I did have to Google where on the planet they actually went was.

King puts something we’ve all done into writing: Musing on Gino’s Yeah Right! part.

One day Rihanna is throwing you hearteyes across the aisle at #NYFW, the next you’re a crumpled Thrasher tee under a pile of new soccer jerseys. It’s a filthy, fickle business, guys. I don’t believe in nothing no more, I’m going to law school!

Franco???

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Hold up wait a minute

Quote of the Week
Inquisitive Gentleman: “Did anyone pull last night?”
Zach Baker: “No, there were too many beautiful boy friends in there.” #LMB

Video Review: The Mandalay Express

November 11th, 2011 | 1:25 pm | Features & Interviews | 4 Comments

The Mandalay Express is a sequel to last year’s more expansive 10,000 Kilometers, which was a train ride through two continents’ worth of skate spots. Mandalay is confined to the southeastern quadrant of Asia, near where the previous video left off, and covers four countries: Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, and Myanmar, via “78 hours of buses” in 30 days. The crew for the trip consists of Casey Rigney, Kenny Reed, Denny Pham, Geng Jakkarin, Laurence Keefe, John Tanner, TF personality / nose manual mastermind Dan Zvereff, and the video’s creator, Patrik Wallner.

Travel videos are made to tap into our instinctual fascination with new skate spots, even if we experience them on a vicarious level. Patrik could make this same video another eight times in regions that have experienced a similar lack-of-interest from mainstream skateboarding (for example, non-Brazilian South America, or even Africa, though probably not the Middle East), and it would be just as interesting. Watching it, we could only imagine what sort of skateable things exist outside of major cities on this planet, as one of the video’s most amazing architectural discoveries is a bust-free, half-completed religious theme resort in the middle of Myanmar, which is described as looking akin to a mini golf course.

Video Review: 10,000 Kilometers

August 4th, 2010 | 3:11 pm | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

White people have a categorical list of things that they want to accomplish in their lives. Many of these have been touched upon throughout the really-funny-when-I-first-read-it-but-slowly-got-less-interesting website, “Stuff White People Like,” and let’s be serious, much of that site is overwhelmingly true. If you were to look at these categories and size them up in accordance with which ones are most complex, travel would outrank home renovation by a narrow margin, and fall slightly short of reaching the crown jewel, education.

There is a whole myriad of travel plans that white people love to talk about, and they don’t simply end at going to Paris, India, or some b-list country in Europe that may or may not have been run by a bunch of drunk Russians that eventually fell asleep in the snow, and were not seen until they were thawed out the following spring. The means of travel is an important facet of the category, because merely taking an airplane is not enough to solidify yourself worthy of extended conversations in an all-white context. At a beginner to intermediate level, there is the cross country American trip, which needs a baby blue Corvette, a grey 1955 Chevy, or whatever the hell Kerouac and those bums drove around in throughout those books they wrote. But once you begin to advance yourself in the travel category, the necessity of completing a two-continent journey becomes to loom over aging white adult life. And there is nothing more heavily romanticized, and as closely associated with old writers that died broke than extremely long train rides.

An idea that skateboarding has been toying with for quite some time is documenting itself in an out-of-context surrounding. It can be seen in everything from the days in the late-eighties when it was actually odd to see a pro skating New York as opposed to California, right through that whole Area 51 gimmick that Transworld ran with in Transmission 7, and the current day obviousness that comes with pros like Kenny Reed being that guy who will go to some country without a sewer system so that he can skate some crusty hubba ledge with a cool background. Billy Rohan basically gave us the skateboard headline of the summer by going to Iraq, so placing skateboarding out-of-context hasn’t exactly become boring yet.