QS Film School — An Intro To Modern Skate Videos With Plots

In Boogie Nights, Paul Thomas Anderson’s film about the porn industry of the 70s and 80s, Burt Reynolds’ Jack Horner gives a fateful speech admonishing the advent of home video: “I have a stable of actors and actresses. They’re professionals. They’re not a bunch of fucking amateurs. They’re proven in the box office. They get people in theaters, where films should be seen, and they know how to fuck.”

It is not hard to imagine similar tirades (maybe with a few words switched out) occurring in Powell-Peralta boardrooms as the 80s were coming to a close, and skateboarding was around the corner from a crash. Skate videos of the decade were refined and narrative-driven, and for good reason. There were only like, six tricks invented at the time, so they had to fill up those other 53 minutes in an hour-long skate video with story, personality shots and other shit.

But what would come after skateboarding’s believed-to-be demise was a rebirth. Videos like Snuff, Video Days, Tim & Henry’s Pack of Lies, and Questionable were unrepentant in their progression — they were too busy inventing modern skateboarding in front of your eyes to worry about the extracurricular malarky from the Animal Chin days. New faces and a camera thrown in a backpack was the name of the game. The old mode was dead. But for how long?

Skateboarding draws many parallels to pornography, but one of the most curious ones is an incessant need to add narrative to something that nobody watches for the story. As we will soon learn, plots returned to skate videos as quickly as they went.

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Nothing Like It

Raw & uncut. Beanie Sigel at the L.E.S. / Manhattan Bridge Skatepark. Photo by Black Dave.

FYI: Supreme has Snackman cruisers and Lamborghinis (designed by Pryce Holmes and Will Carpio) available for $50 + tax. Available online soon eventually.

Another FYI: Get your entries in for our stupid line contest by the end of the week (due by the end of the day, Friday), and win a Girl/Indy/Spitfire complete, Nikes, Oakleys and 4-Star gear. The stupider, the better.

Here’s a standalone YouTube link to the Bronze / Flipmode section from TWOMANJI in all its 360p glory. In our initial post, we neglected to commend TWOMANJI on its usage of two classic Styles P songs (“Holiday” and “Nobody Believes Me“), so lets take some time out to do that now.

The Chrome Ball Incident interviewed Jeff Pang about being a New York-based pro skater in the 80s and early-90s. “I think in Harold’s mind he thought that the letter was somehow delivered to it’s destination through a wormhole, not knowing that a postman comes by every day to pick up the mail and brings it to the post office.”

Anyone looking for a job? There’s a chill opening in Midtown.

Animal NY did an interview with “two dudes who skated from Boston to New York.”

Here’s a throwaway reel from the crew behind the “Gravity Hammers” from several weeks ago. Been saying this forever, but skateboarders really like Big L.

After getting sidetracked on Twitter about the ten-year anniversary of Lord Willin’ and how there are barely any decent Clipse songs in skate videos, this Dan Murphy part from YOUGOTTAGETTHAT edited to “Popular Demand” (the only great song from the last Clipse album) came to mind. There’s also this 2006 SevenFiveSeven.org clip edited to a “Mr. Me Too” and Outkast “Chonkyfire” blend.

Lil’ Wayne says he doesn’t like New York (Whew. No TrukFit demos at the L.E.S. park!), and a New York senator demands that he apologize. This is what New York politicians worry about nowadays — apologies from Lil’ Wayne and banning big sodas.

Check out T-Bird’s music video cameo debut. Add this to the list of Mooney and Ty in an Ashlee Simpson video, Tierney, B.D. and Mooney in a N.E.R.D. video, and Weiss in a Timberlake video. We big in the music video extras world.

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R.I.P. Neil Armstrong