Liv on Sundays, King of Diamonds Monday

October 26th, 2011 | 3:34 pm | Daily News | 6 Comments

Quartersnacks is the only skateboard media institution that goes to King of Diamonds and gets haircuts at 4:30 in the morning. How could anyone be content with the boring stagnation otherwise running rampant throughout the industry?

Monday links on a Wednesday…

Quick fall clip featuring a lot of hills, Leo Gutman, some wallies, and two edits of the same footage: White people music edit and backpack rap edit.

A few months ago, Matthew Mooney abandoned his dreams of professional skateboarder superstardom and Googled who the oldest player to be drafted into the NBA was, quickly reignited his childhood passion for basketball, and changed his career path. Our good friend Joe Cups made a short documentary about Mooney’s streetball skills, called “Mooneyball.” Now if only the NBA actually still paid players…

Nollie bigger spins with lime green wheels in this throwaway clip from some 2nd Nature affiliates. These dudes have spots.

If you’re into being smart and stuff, Raphael Zarka, author of On a Day With No Waves: A Chronicle of Skateboarding will be giving a lecture in SoHo on November 10 called “The Geometry of Skateboarding” at 6 P.M. More information here, and it is free with a reservation.

Black Dave – Smokin’ Dat Green (Audio) BLACK DONALD TRUMP LEAK!! SMOKERS

(Late) Spot News: Grant’s Tomb is kind of a bust now, Morningside School is blocked off for construction, and that stupid NYU up-ledge has been de-knobbed for the 8th time.

Events This Week: 43 Magazine Launch party tomorrow (October 27) at 41 Grand Street from 6 to 11. KCDC is having a Halloween party on Saturday. 2nd Nature is having one on Saturday too.

If you’re running low on Halloween costume ideas, this one is sure to be a guaranteed hit with the ladies.

Quote of the Week
Observant Gentleman: “Every time I have Swiss bearings, it seems like everyone else’s are better than mine.”
Isak Buan: “Yeah, it’s sort of like having a girlfriend.”

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Book Review: On a Day With No Waves – A Chronicle of Skateboarding by Raphaël Zarka

August 17th, 2011 | 12:05 pm | Features & Interviews | 10 Comments

If the act of skateboarding is a universal language, then does a skateboarder need to know how to speak, let alone decipher the meaning of text?Inquisitive Gentleman

I now leave to the magazines, to the growing number of documentaries, blogs and the internet in general, the task of completing and filling out the gaps in this project.Raphaël Zarka

Review by Galen Dekemper

The methods of product presentation and transmission are important in a multimedia age. In 2011 one can easily curate a history of skateboarding through video clips. The writer realizes that these video relics show skateboarding to be an act unparalleled in self-containment and visual definition. Filmed video parts are mimicry far more exact than what the writer can endeavor to shape with his words. Yet as the endless amount of footage expands to the point where there is more skateboarding online than pornography, the oeuvre grows nearly as difficult to navigate as the three levels of Central Park Hubba. Still one feels compelled to attempt success in the face of likely failure. Spirited conversation and literacy prove helpful as a way of determining what’s really good. One learns to trust one’s suppliers.

To examine skateboard literature into and beyond the industry canon of magazine writing is an autodidact’s game. Superstars have penned their life tales. Someone in Texas has channeled Justin Pierce’s ghost. The occasional coffee table edition may include a worthwhile introduction. To be aware of Skateboarding, Space and the City, by Iain Borden, shows that one has reached a plateau of skateboard reading. Due to the rarity of books in comparison to other skateboard media, the appearance of a new skateboarding book merits attention. With On a Day With No Waves: A Chronicle of Skateboarding, Mr. Zarka has chosen to document skateboarding’s history in a 230 year timeline.

There is pleasure to be found in reading Zarka’s chronicle in its entirety, as history does exist and ideas emerge through connections in linear time. In George Orwell’s 1984, a misled character claims that books are good to the extent that they reinforce thoughts the reader already believed. This chronology refutes such a claim, as the book is as its best when it prompts one to look beyond its pages, to perform research of one’s own on a subject of interest, much in the way a good skate video sends one outside, firecrackering off the curb, ready to do some tricks of one’s own.