‘Like’ This Post If You’re Going Skateboarding in 2016 Dressed Like Wade Desarmo in 1998

May 11th, 2016 | 3:09 pm | Time Capsule | 1 Comment

wade d

Maybe I’ve been spending too much time around the the Vert God, but it’s becoming tough to deny the switch hardflip’s increased value among the social media skateboard landscape. We’re entering a post-Ryan Gallant/post-Matt Miller world, meaning people are no longer ashamed to whip out their non-flipping hardflips in public. Imperfect hardflips of the less-than-Gallant variety have entered the playful realm of “dad tricks.” There’s charm to their imperfection.

And what better lo-def, rickety flatground switch hardflip to go down in the un-storied history of the trick, than in fashion time traveler Wade Desarmo’s first-ever part, which was released the same year as ATCQ‘s last album. It’s almost unfair dude ended up being the only Canadian to crack the 2012 #phatstylez master list — seeing as how he had a H.G Wells G-Wagon to predict the 6XL Umbro jersey + bucket hat look fifteen years before it would adorn undersized caucasians who skateboard in the New York metropolitan area.

Icons of the Pop Shove-It

May 5th, 2016 | 1:59 am | Time Capsule | 9 Comments

shuv

Upon hearing that we replayed a ~♥fabulous♥~ pop shove it 5x in one clip earlier this spring, the Shove-It Gods pointed us in the direction of what can surely hold a place on the ever-rotating merry-go-round that is this website’s contention for third greatest line ever done (after Carroll at the Library™ and Quim doing those two frontside 5050s.)

Yesterday, noted sweatpant clothier, Jimmy Gorecki, #rp-ed another Jimmy’s skateboard moves from two decades past. Jimmy Chung, of 411 #19 Fairman’s Industry Section fame, has been posting raw IG clips from his brief mid nineties run that mostly existed in Fairman’s shop videos. One included this absolute gem of a pop shove-it, an equally ravishing backside flip, and a slutty switch manual that looks better than you ever thought a mere switch manual could look on a foot-high ledge.

A video posted by @llmantisll on

YouTube wormhole ensued, leading to all three of the aforementioned Fairman’s videos, the best of which is the third, from 1995.

1) Yo nobody not named Jahmal will ever look that cool opening a part with a backside 5050 on a #regular #ass ledge.
2) Dude predicted the precise hallmarks of the 90s vintage revival to a T. If you told me he was styling parts and not the @vintagesponsor guy, I’d believe you.
3) Has anyone ever made the full 360 around the Love fountain for a line? Figure it happened in a Sabotage video, but can’t recall in particular.
4) As my good friend Mike the Dad pointed out, how many *great* feebles on round bars outside of Matt Reason really exist? It’s a stock trick that rarely excels beyond, just like, grinding really long. The one he ends his part off with is a non-Reason exception. Must be da capris.

Marijuana Smells Like Drugs

April 20th, 2016 | 11:17 am | Time Capsule | 6 Comments

420

If you came on here searching for a part by a noted New Rochelle skateboarder that has been promised to drop on 4/20 — it’s being worked on. And no, it has nothing to do with the holiday in which companies release hemp-themed collaborations.

In the meantime, please enjoy this nine-year-old video of Billy Rohan going to a pro-weed rally at Tompkins with a megaphone that has a “legalize” sticker on it, to inform protesters that marijuana makes your breath smell like a bong. It ranks as one of the top three achievements ever to take place at Tompkins Square Park, right along with Mike Wright making it to the final round of the 2003 éS Game of S.K.A.T.E. without flipping his board a single time (fakie 540 shuv-its fam), and Slicky Boy leaving his V-card on one of the green benches. I know it by heart and it still makes me laugh.

Happy birthday to Life is Goodie.

A 1995 Portral Into 2016

March 25th, 2016 | 1:02 am | Time Capsule | 4 Comments

quim 5050

No matter how advanced things seem, fundamental artifacts remain timeless. When stuff gets too technical, too big and too hard to keep track of — simple, refined skating stands out amid the stair-counting. It’s part of the recipe behind today’s moment for small companies and slimmed-down trick lists.

Ride On is a 1995 Deluxe promo that doesn’t get the same nostalgic love as say, Non Fiction or Fucktards do. It resurfaced during a ATCQ #musicsupervision wormhole that turned into a Joey Bast wormhole once his Silver part ended.

The promo struck a chord for more reasons than the #pants. While it probably won’t incite the “come out today and still hold up”-hyperbole that was discussed last week, it does seem oddly current and in tune with what’s going on throughout skateboarding’s more refined palette today, particularly in New York. From Huf’s one-or-two push lines that include nothing more than 180s, trashcans, streetgaps and maybe a kickflip, to a time when a really good 360 flip off a bump was “enough” to end a section off with — it all came back with a vengeance as we began to drift away from the age of after-black hammers and taking five years to film a video.

Added bonuses are Quim beginning his reign as the greatest two-5050s-in-one-line practitioner ever, front of Union Square lines that wouldn’t look out of place if they were HD in a 2016 Johnny Wilson video, Ethan Fowler skating Pier 7 unlike anyone famous for skating Pier 7 would skate Pier 7, and Ryan Hickey doing a four-trick Astor line that’s about half as long as the 44-second YouTube compilation of all his footage.

A Godfather of Six-Figure Ledge Skating [#TBT]

March 17th, 2016 | 12:55 pm | Time Capsule | 6 Comments

dna-skateboards-jerry-fowler-2000

So I often ask the subjects of these interviews who they consider to be the most underrated skater of the 1990s and your name has come up more than a few times. Do you think there were aspects of your career that went underappreciated or didn’t get their proper due?

Do I feel like I didn’t get enough shine? No. I don’t feel that way at all. To hear that people think that is awesome but I don’t feel that I’m owed anything or that something should’ve have gotten more praise than it did. At the end of the day, I don’t know what I could’ve done more than what I did. But that’s cool to hear.The Chrome Ball Incident / November 2, 2012

Nobody was as much of a precursor to today’s brand of highbrow ledge tricks as Jerry Fowler. Look no further than onetime six-figure ledge skater, Brian Wenning, admitting last week that the origin of the backside nosegrind pop-out craze (which very much still resonates in today’s fickle beanplanted times) leads back to a jack-move pulled on Jerry’s west coast-bred, east coast-honed bag of tricks.

Everyone knows that the “this could come out today and still hold up“-hyperbole is wishful thinking 95% of the time. Wenning says it about Photosynthesis in the aforementioned interview, but we have gotten lightyears past the new AM being able to end off his first part with a switch 360 flip down nine. Although his 411 section gets the most burn on the social media circuit, watch Jerry Fowler’s DNA Continuum part. You’ll see the half cab nosegrind revert fishhooks that Puig does, the frontside 180 no comply fakie 5-0s that Aaron Herrington does, and the backside shove-its into backside grinds that Hjalte does — a decade-plus before said tricks would come to occupy the minds of today’s most #trickselection savvy skateboarders.

Six-Figure Ledge Skating: The “Hundred Dollar Autograph” of the Skateboard World ;)