Big Up…To All My Haters

September 22nd, 2016 | 12:42 pm | Time Capsule | 6 Comments

dey-know

Shawty Lo died in a car crash early yesterday morning. No, Lo has no place in the canon of skate video music supervision. In fact, he’s exactly the sort of artist whose music geriatric skater types will insist you are using “ironically” in YouTube comments.

Quartersnacks has often utilized a #musicsupervision approach akin to a video like Trilogy: a 1996 video full of songs released in 1996, mirroring what the people involved in making it were actually listening to during the time. For that same reason, there has always been a special joy in major videos using songs that soundtracked a summer, or helped us power through a winter. I had an ear-to-ear smile on my face the second I heard the “I Love It” beat at the start of Biebel’s Fully Flared section for the first time. Even in those middle school years when RJD2 was cool, there was something validating about hearing it in Mosaic.

That same joy of skate videos using songs that pushpin memories into your mind doesn’t exist anymore. A mixtape will come out, and by the end of the week, there are three Insta clips to songs off it, and at least one new video in your YouTube subscription feed using the same tune for a trip clip. Nobody is going to skate to “Brocolli” in a major video next year, and if someone does, who cares.

It was the the start of 2008, and Jeezy hadn’t released an album in over a year. This was when he was at the height of his powers — the most effective motivational speaker on a desperate planet approaching a recession, and in need of a spark. To hold us over, he dropped Ice Cream Man Part 2, which included the remix to Shawty Lo’s “Dey Know.” The regular version was everywhere at that point: the horns were infectious, and the initial beat drop is the sonic equivalent of when the ball swishes through the hoop for the win at the buzzer. The remix gave it a second life, soundtracking every skate trip car ride that spring, and essential at the parties that we were able to sneak into.

Most skaters in 2008 didn’t take the Trilogy soundtracking approach. They’d rather edit to a Big L song, or a remix of a Big L song, or a remix of a remix of a Big L song remixed by a guy who specializes in remixing Big L songs. Someone skating to “Dey Know” in the year it peaked would’ve been massive; it’s the perfect fit for the second part of a video. In 2009, it would’ve been cool. Nobody skated to it until 2013.

Theotis’ part in the Shake Junt video isn’t particularly seminal or even well-edited. It looks like they slapped it together with what they had, but it’s the only thing I remember from that video. It made me remember those spring night drives to skate the Bridgeport ledges, and those nights skating midtown with the “Dey Know” remix on the iPod. Hearing those horns over any sort of skating gave me the same feeling of first hearing “I Love It” in Biebel’s part, even if Theotis’ part in the chicken bone video was nowhere near the generation-defining event Lakai’s was.

There hasn’t been as profound of a moment for one of those songs that encapsulates an entire season in much the same way since — probably because they only muffle under skate noises from iPhone speakers now, 60 seconds at a time.

R.I.P. Shawty Lo. Big up…to all my haters.

Before the Bronze Age: Ten Years Since Flipmode 3

July 14th, 2016 | 5:20 am | Time Capsule | 8 Comments

flipmode 3 premiere

Throughout the VHS and DVD skate video era, the brunt of the work put into the few New York full-lengths that existed was at the helm of New Jerseyians, Long Islanders and ex-pats.

Then, Flipmode came along — a crew of virtually sponsorless (unless you’re counting Shut or Official flow) Queens kids who grew up skating the Forrest Park Bandshell and Flushing Meadows Park. They became the first group of dominantly-actually-from-a-New-York-City-borough kids to make a rewatchable, hour-long skate video.

On this day, exactly ten years ago, Suck My Flipmode A.K.A. Flipmode 3: The First Flipmode Video (the first two had low circulation on VHS tapes among friends) premiered on the screen in front of Supreme. In 2006, a skatepark meant either Mullaly’s, Riverside, Owl’s Head or recycled plastic ramps under the Manhattan Bridge. The Banks were still semi skateable. iPhones didn’t exist, and everyone found out about the premiere on Myspace. YouTube was in its first year of existence, and Official New York was on the way out. New York was also far from occupying its current day status as the second home of the skate industry, April thru September.

Skateboarding in New York, up until that point, was a grown-ups only club. You could tag along on their sessions if they liked you, but you never truly belonged. Their footage would either get hoarded, sent out to video mags, or if lucky, end up in the few full-length artifacts from the era (those ABC videos, Lurkers 1 & 2…that’s about it.) The average age in Flipmode was ~17-18, and it exceeded the natives-only litmus test unlike any of those other videos. It also helped that it got co-signs from those same older guys, as New York still had a lingering us-v.s.-them line drawn between our generation, and the generation of dudes who were around for all the shit from the 90s that people today still *ahhhh* over.

It might be forgotten in a sea of solo jazz cups now, but it was a truly a watershed moment for below-drinking-age skateboarding in New York — an initial building block in the brick maze Windows 95 screensaver empire known as Bronze 56k.

Thank you Peter. Thank you Jimmy Marketti, Billy, X, Leo, Joseph, Ryan O’Donnell, Drippy, Pedro, and Derrick — by the way, my post got over 800 likes. What’s up with the comeback part?

‘Like’ This Post If You’re Going Skateboarding in 2016 Dressed Like Wade Desarmo in 1998

May 11th, 2016 | 3:09 pm | Time Capsule | 1 Comment

wade d

Maybe I’ve been spending too much time around the the Vert God, but it’s becoming tough to deny the switch hardflip’s increased value among the social media skateboard landscape. We’re entering a post-Ryan Gallant/post-Matt Miller world, meaning people are no longer ashamed to whip out their non-flipping hardflips in public. Imperfect hardflips of the less-than-Gallant variety have entered the playful realm of “dad tricks.” There’s charm to their imperfection.

And what better lo-def, rickety flatground switch hardflip to go down in the un-storied history of the trick, than in fashion time traveler Wade Desarmo’s first-ever part, which was released the same year as ATCQ‘s last album. It’s almost unfair dude ended up being the only Canadian to crack the 2012 #phatstylez master list — seeing as how he had a H.G Wells G-Wagon to predict the 6XL Umbro jersey + bucket hat look fifteen years before it would adorn undersized caucasians who skateboard in the New York metropolitan area.

Icons of the Pop Shove-It

May 5th, 2016 | 1:59 am | Time Capsule | 9 Comments

shuv

Upon hearing that we replayed a ~♥fabulous♥~ pop shove it 5x in one clip earlier this spring, the Shove-It Gods pointed us in the direction of what can surely hold a place on the ever-rotating merry-go-round that is this website’s contention for third greatest line ever done (after Carroll at the Library™ and Quim doing those two frontside 5050s.)

Yesterday, noted sweatpant clothier, Jimmy Gorecki, #rp-ed another Jimmy’s skateboard moves from two decades past. Jimmy Chung, of 411 #19 Fairman’s Industry Section fame, has been posting raw IG clips from his brief mid nineties run that mostly existed in Fairman’s shop videos. One included this absolute gem of a pop shove-it, an equally ravishing backside flip, and a slutty switch manual that looks better than you ever thought a mere switch manual could look on a foot-high ledge.

A video posted by @llmantisll on

YouTube wormhole ensued, leading to all three of the aforementioned Fairman’s videos, the best of which is the third, from 1995.

1) Yo nobody not named Jahmal will ever look that cool opening a part with a backside 5050 on a #regular #ass ledge.
2) Dude predicted the precise hallmarks of the 90s vintage revival to a T. If you told me he was styling parts and not the @vintagesponsor guy, I’d believe you.
3) Has anyone ever made the full 360 around the Love fountain for a line? Figure it happened in a Sabotage video, but can’t recall in particular.
4) As my good friend Mike the Dad pointed out, how many *great* feebles on round bars outside of Matt Reason really exist? It’s a stock trick that rarely excels beyond, just like, grinding really long. The one he ends his part off with is a non-Reason exception. Must be da capris.

Marijuana Smells Like Drugs

April 20th, 2016 | 11:17 am | Time Capsule | 6 Comments

420

If you came on here searching for a part by a noted New Rochelle skateboarder that has been promised to drop on 4/20 — it’s being worked on. And no, it has nothing to do with the holiday in which companies release hemp-themed collaborations.

In the meantime, please enjoy this nine-year-old video of Billy Rohan going to a pro-weed rally at Tompkins with a megaphone that has a “legalize” sticker on it, to inform protesters that marijuana makes your breath smell like a bong. It ranks as one of the top three achievements ever to take place at Tompkins Square Park, right along with Mike Wright making it to the final round of the 2003 éS Game of S.K.A.T.E. without flipping his board a single time (fakie 540 shuv-its fam), and Slicky Boy leaving his V-card on one of the green benches. I know it by heart and it still makes me laugh.

Happy birthday to Life is Goodie.