On Skateboarding As Sport As Stupid — The 2017 Dime Glory Challenge

September 15th, 2017 | 2:46 pm | Features & Interviews | 11 Comments

Words & Photos by Zach Baker

As the cloud of loud begins to dissipate from the stimulation of last week’s festivities up in Montreal, it is time to reflect. Tony Soprano once said, “I feel like King Midas in reverse, everything I touch turns to shit.” Since their inception, the Dime boys have proven to be a bunch of full-blown regular ass speed King Midases. There has not been a single public offering — be it a bowling montage, full-length skate video, a collab baby, or any of the annual skateboarding competitions to which they’ve played host the past three years — that has not gone off without a hitch. But this year’s Glory Challenge, with the newfound aide of DC Shoes, was more frivolous than anyone anticipated. DC, recently reclaimed by one of its original co-founders, weighed in hard with their trademark mountain of money, bringing the spectacle to a new echelon. We’re talking renting Wade D. a Ferrari and a helicopter for an Instagram post, a pyrotechnics exhibition that was described as “a buffet of fire,” renting ten limos to go bowling, and throwing a carnival-esque block party DJed by Darude that felt like a billionaire kid’s freakin’ quinciñera. These and every other tiny, speed shade-tinted detail amount to, from where I’m standing, the most expensive joke ever.

This long weekend of overstimulation has left us still unpacking all that happened. So these guys went out, invested all this effort, capital, manpower, organization…for…a joke? It took these boys the better part of a year to plan. Bryan worked tirelessly for weeks on end to construct the many rooms and modifiable obstacles of this year’s Glory Challenge. Legends like Tiago, Biebel, Kalis and Forrest Edwards were flown from the extremes of the continent to be in attendance…for a weekend of laughs? Listen — I’m no Miscavage, I don’t have all the answers — but the spectacle has left thousands of people at once psyched, inspired, shocked, and confused.

An Interview With John Gardner

August 10th, 2017 | 2:51 pm | Features & Interviews | No Comments

Photo by Andy Enos

Intro & Interview by Zach Baker

A dope thing about skateboarding is that it attracts an endless variety of people, who are each drawn to it for their own specific reasons. We all have our unique relationships within skateboarding as far as what we want to do, who we want to be around, and where we want to go on, with, or because of them.

John Gardner’s motivations on a skateboard are not so easily pigeon-holed, though it can be said that he’s not adhering to any sort of trends in attire, trick selection, or really, well anything. It makes one wonder whether he even needs a skateboard. Like, if the skateboard were never invented, I feel like John Gardner would figure out some other vehicle to sate his physical and creative urges. This points to part of what makes him such a delight to watch. For some people, skateboarding is what creates their identity. But for John, the skateboard is just an accessory, one of many mediums lending themselves to his way of life and creative pursuits. Without the board, he’d be no less extraordinary, but as skateboarders, we couldn’t be more fortunate to have him as a member of the club.

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To start…the video part. It was just a pleasure to watch. Give me a little overview.

I had a bunch of VX footage that was just kind of sitting around, and I had always wanted to make music for a video part but never really had an opportunity to do so, so I immediately connected the dots and thought that this would be a great opportunity to make that happen. It’s over the course of two-and-a-half years, whenever a VX came out. Some of those clips might even be three of four years old. A lot of it is in California with some Jersey sprinkled in between.

Tell me about the soundtrack.

My friend Max Hersteiner, who I used to live with, is in an amazing band called Dirty Fences — he’s in a couple bands actually, Dirty Fences and Metal Leg. He and the bassist of Dirty Fences and Metal Leg, Max Komaski, all created music together for various video projects that I’ve made, so I hit those dudes up immediately to just jam and see what we came up with. Max’s friend Danny Cooper played guitar for the soundtrack. We just set up a camera, experimented and that’s what we came up with.

What’s up with your uncle?

My uncle is a wild man. He is my uncle Semo, my dad’s brother. He has a lot of upper body strength and is really good at doing handstands. He would walk up and down stairs on his hands when he was younger, so he naturally gravitated to riding a skateboard on his hands. I had a camera and wanted him to be in this little video that I was making, so we drove around looking for a little hill and filmed him doing his thing and that’s what I got. He loves skateboarding and he really tries but he skates better on his hands than I would say he skates on his feet.

Long Island With Gino Iannucci

August 3rd, 2017 | 3:33 pm | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

Words & Interview by Zach Baker
Portrait by Marcel Veldman

A noted distinction between skateboarder-types and the rest of the world is that we have knack from drumming up cool shit in even some of the wackest places. You’re probably bored to bits by the cliched assertion that “skaters see the world differently,” but that whole “most people just see a bench while we see a canvas” thing still holds some weight, and it can be argued that this critical gaze extends beyond spotting natural transitions and waxable granite. We’re generally discerning, attentive to detail and uncover the most flattering aspects in even the most mundane of areas.

So we’ve started a new little recurring series where skaters we admire guide us through their hometowns. The first one is with Gino.

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I was born in Manhasset, Long Island. It’s towards the north shore, center of Long Island, about forty minutes by train, half hour drive from the city. I grew up in Westbury, Nassau County, which is about a ten-minute drive from Manhasset. Westbury was a mix of upper middle class, middle class, and a little bit beneath middle class. We lived really close to the border of the extremely wealthy, which is right over the Jericho Turnpike in Old Westbury. It was really close to some unreal, beautiful homes. As far as nationalities: heavy Italian, heavy Irish, heavy African-American in Westbury. When I was growing up you could see the South American and El Salvadorian community growing, and now the Spanish are like the Italians of when I was younger.

Issa Link

May 22nd, 2017 | 4:43 am | Daily News | 4 Comments

og respect

Johnny Wilson [depicted above] broke his collarbone this past weekend and needs some of your help covering his medical bills. Please donate here. He promises to post weekly video blogs again once he’s recovered jk.

Damn, the HUF store is the new hot spot in New York.

“What’d you do last night?” “Got choked up watching twenty-year-old footage of people I’ve never met before.” Manolo’s FTC remix video is I N C R E D I B L E. It’s twenty minutes long and an emotional rollercoaster that reminds you how beautiful skateboarding is, how amazing all the friends you meet in it are, and how many perfect songs have been born via “Munchies For Your Love” samples.

“Once I finished the Sideyard, I didn’t have anything else to work on. I started having ideas of stuff to do with mold-making because I was doing so much of that at work, so I started building little concrete sculptures.” — Zach Baker interviewed my favorite skater, Max Palmer. P.S. I have seven or seventeen favorite skaters.

Black Sheep Skate Shop’s second full-length video is now online.

To supplement that psychotic part Oski dropped last week, Free Skate Mag compiled a bunch of his scattered clips throughout Instagram and montages to make a summer remix. That three back 360s line omg.

Don’t apologize buddy.”

You’re doing pretty good if the biggest regret of your career is only riding for Quattro Wheels. Chromeball interview #101 is with 101 rider, Eric Koston.

Matt Velez uploaded Mark Humienik’s Sable part as a loosie as per our request :)

Here’s fifteen minutes of Walker Ryan New York raw footage, including a good bit of B-sides that weren’t in the reedit video from a couple weeks back.

The POP videos are one of our favorite (and oddly enough, most underrated) montage series coming out of Europe. Someone made a 15-minute POP remix.

Louie Lopez had to give his report card to his first shop sponsor in order to get on the team, and Pontus Alv looks through some old boxes.

Skate Muzik Episode #6 is with Peter Bici.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Ewing Theory™ for the win!

Quote of the Week: “Yo, do you wanna hear some bars?” — Slicky Boy, 2:30 A.M. on the dance floor of a China Chalet party

Be yourselves y’all. Baby you’re a firework ♥

A Couple Boys in Mexico xoxo

May 3rd, 2017 | 3:18 am | Video & Remixes | 5 Comments

zered bs flip copy

Photo via Kooks Mag

None of us ever had to talk about each other’s bowel movements so much. Then we went to Mexico City for a week.

“Don’t drink the water!” is what they say — disregarding the fact that it’s impossible to avoid every little thing that has ever come in contact with the city’s tap. Whether it’s the lettuce in a sandwich or the ice in a slutty drink, some percentage of everything is tainted. Nobody escaped unscathed. We went from claiming 100 tacos in seven days, to fifty tacos, to eating Domino’s for lunch halfway thru the week because, like, how scary can bread and cheese be?

Between searching for public bathrooms, and after realizing a slight culture barrier between us and the people showing us around (they took us to Baker spots because we had a couple people paid to skateboard with us, and based on the videos we were watching, being good at skateboarding in Mexico means you can tailslide a fifty-stair round rail), this is how the week went. A true testament to the beauty of Mexico City is that despite our unanimous gastro-intestinal ailments, everyone still had an amazing time. And no, nobody gave a fuck about that stupid wall.

Thanks to everyone who showed us around, and to the cops that accepted our like ~$25 bribe (oddly enough, you can’t drink in public) ♥ Also, I’m ok with not hearing Kodak Black for a couple months.

Features Etienne Gagne, Zach Baker, Zered Bassett, Emilio Cuilan, Adrian Vega and Will Marshall.

All the cool garms you see in this clip can be purchased on the Alltimers site btw.

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