Issa Link

May 22nd, 2017 | 4:43 am | Daily News | 4 Comments

og respect

Johnny Wilson [depicted above] broke his collarbone this past weekend and needs some of your help covering his medical bills. Please donate here. He promises to post weekly video blogs again once he’s recovered jk.

Damn, the HUF store is the new hot spot in New York.

“What’d you do last night?” “Got choked up watching twenty-year-old footage of people I’ve never met before.” Manolo’s FTC remix video is I N C R E D I B L E. It’s twenty minutes long and an emotional rollercoaster that reminds you how beautiful skateboarding is, how amazing all the friends you meet in it are, and how many perfect songs have been born via “Munchies For Your Love” samples.

“Once I finished the Sideyard, I didn’t have anything else to work on. I started having ideas of stuff to do with mold-making because I was doing so much of that at work, so I started building little concrete sculptures.” — Zach Baker interviewed my favorite skater, Max Palmer. P.S. I have seven or seventeen favorite skaters.

Black Sheep Skate Shop’s second full-length video is now online.

To supplement that psychotic part Oski dropped last week, Free Skate Mag compiled a bunch of his scattered clips throughout Instagram and montages to make a summer remix. That three back 360s line omg.

Don’t apologize buddy.”

You’re doing pretty good if the biggest regret of your career is only riding for Quattro Wheels. Chromeball interview #101 is with 101 rider, Eric Koston.

Matt Velez uploaded Mark Humienik’s Sable part as a loosie as per our request :)

Here’s fifteen minutes of Walker Ryan New York raw footage, including a good bit of B-sides that weren’t in the reedit video from a couple weeks back.

The POP videos are one of our favorite (and oddly enough, most underrated) montage series coming out of Europe. Someone made a 15-minute POP remix.

Louie Lopez had to give his report card to his first shop sponsor in order to get on the team, and Pontus Alv looks through some old boxes.

Skate Muzik Episode #6 is with Peter Bici.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Ewing Theory™ for the win!

Quote of the Week: “Yo, do you wanna hear some bars?” — Slicky Boy, 2:30 A.M. on the dance floor of a China Chalet party

Be yourselves y’all. Baby you’re a firework ♥

A Couple Boys in Mexico xoxo

May 3rd, 2017 | 3:18 am | Video & Remixes | 5 Comments

zered bs flip copy

Photo via Kooks Mag

None of us ever had to talk about each other’s bowel movements so much. Then we went to Mexico City for a week.

“Don’t drink the water!” is what they say — disregarding the fact that it’s impossible to avoid every little thing that has ever come in contact with the city’s tap. Whether it’s the lettuce in a sandwich or the ice in a slutty drink, some percentage of everything is tainted. Nobody escaped unscathed. We went from claiming 100 tacos in seven days, to fifty tacos, to eating Domino’s for lunch halfway thru the week because, like, how scary can bread and cheese be?

Between searching for public bathrooms, and after realizing a slight culture barrier between us and the people showing us around (they took us to Baker spots because we had a couple people paid to skateboard with us, and based on the videos we were watching, being good at skateboarding in Mexico means you can tailslide a fifty-stair round rail), this is how the week went. A true testament to the beauty of Mexico City is that despite our unanimous gastro-intestinal ailments, everyone still had an amazing time. And no, nobody gave a fuck about that stupid wall.

Thanks to everyone who showed us around, and to the cops that accepted our like ~$25 bribe (oddly enough, you can’t drink in public) ♥ Also, I’m ok with not hearing Kodak Black for a couple months.

Features Etienne Gagne, Zach Baker, Zered Bassett, Emilio Cuilan, Adrian Vega and Will Marshall.

All the cool garms you see in this clip can be purchased on the Alltimers site btw.

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An Interview With Mitchell Wilson

April 5th, 2017 | 1:03 pm | Features & Interviews | 9 Comments

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Words & Interview by Zach Baker
Photos by Colin Sussingham & Max Hull

We’ve all heard more than a few skateboarders use the term “family” to describe their group of friends, mutually-funded acquaintances, or more broadly, everyone who has ever owned a skateboard, whether or not they’ve even met. But I think I speak for all of us when I say that it has always been a source of fascination when you hear of people that skate together who are, well, actually siblings. Guys like Jonas and Jeremy Wray, Mike and Quim Cardona, Dustin and Tristan Henry — it always seemed so nice to grow up with a brother or sister who also skated.

Courtesy of Max Hull’s owl-like awareness, it was brought to our attention that a number of Slap commenters are a bit confused about the genealogy of contemporary skateboarding’s most popular brothers: the Wilsons. Mitchell Wilson, a.k.a. Crazy Mitch From Philly, is Andrew and Johnny’s oldest brother. As you maybe know, and in keeping with the higher-publicized talents of the his bloodline, Mitch is anomalously fucked at skating. What separates Mitch is that, unlike his brothers who are very much a part of the multi-billion-dollar skate industry, Mitch has always been untethered by the throes of brand affiliation and marketing teams, which has granted him the liberty to say, post an Instagram story of himself scribbling on his teeth with Crayons, dive headfirst into a pile of garbage, or say generally whatever he wants with minimal repercussion save maybe a black eye.

While many of his compatriots have migrated north in search of art-handling gigs and diamondplated metal, Mitchell has been downright stubborn in his affinity for Philadelphia, so much so that he allegedly gives his whole family Philadelphia t-shirts and souvenirs for Christmas every year.

So, to clarify, Mitchell, the guy who does wallie kickflips, slappy switch smith grinds, and that really, really long winding slappy in Paych, is the oldest brother of Andrew and John Wilson. Josh Wilson is not at all related.

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Who’s your favorite skateboarder?

I didn’t have one for years because I never even thought about it, but when I started working at Woodward, every kid would ask me that, so, I guess, Tony Trujillo.

What’s up with wallie kickflips?

I was trying frontside wallie backside 180s, and it flipped one time. I figured out how to make it flip and just tried to land on it. I can’t really do it anymore, it was just a passing thing. But I’ve tried heelflip ones and I’ve tried them switch.

More Spots

March 20th, 2017 | 1:24 pm | Daily News | 3 Comments

etienne

Is E.T. still in Spain? Photo by Zach Baker

New spring goods now live on Alltimers.com. Just don’t expect a text back from Pryce.

but is E.T. still in Spain?

Over the weekend, there was a scare that Shorty’s was being demolished. Although it ended up being a miscommunication between the city and a private company, part of the structure was demolished, but much of the spot remains in tact. The Shorty’s crew met with the mayor of Newark today, and you can read an update here.

Jason Byoun wallies off of snow.

Bunches and bunches of interviews this week…

Super refreshing to see an interview with a nineties pro from the east coast that doesn’t tread the bitter waters that cover so many recollections of that time period. Chromeball interview #99 is with civil engineer, Andy Stone. Anndd Twitter’s saying the newly surfaced footage of him belongs in the Smithsonian.

Speedway Mag posted its extended interview with Josh Stewart about the entire Static series on the occasion of Theories’ ten-year anniversary. (The edited version originally appeared on the Keen Distribution site if some bits seem familiar.)

Pontus Alv interviews Johnny Wilson and then Pontus Alv interviews Bobby Puleo.

Cafe Creme blog interviewed R.B. Umali.

A Minnesotan asks a good question: why isn’t Chicago a bigger deal in skateboarding?

“Elsewhere in Los Angeles, Jim Greco boils.” As discussed last week, skateboarding has doubled down on angst while angsty icons of the 2000s have rebranded themselves with a newfound focus on straightforward skateboarding. Boil the Ocean considers our age of the self-concious comeback in skateboarding.

Consult aforelinked Andy Stone interview for context on why people still fawn over 411 videos. Tennyson comes through with another compilation, this time an eleven-minute mash-up Carl Shipman and Tom Penny, maybe the only guy out there who can keep your attention with twenty-year-old contest footage :)

This Rowan Zorilla Instagram comp is a good time.

The Northern Co. goes all-city in their five-minute “Summer Trip to New York” montage. (Ok fine, they don’t go to Staten Island — has there ever been a truly all-city summer montage though?)

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week Year[?]: Who is James Harden again?

Quote of the Week
Conor Prunty: “It took me like two years to learn how to ollie.”
Jesse Alba: “My dad is still learning how to ollie, he’s been skating for like 40 years.”

dude

Gotta get back on it, sorry :(

An Interview With Alexis Sablone

March 9th, 2017 | 11:15 am | Features & Interviews | 11 Comments

alexis sablone interview

Intro & Interview by Zach Baker
Headline Photo by Richard Hart

PJ Ladd’s Wonderful Horrible Life was an anomaly. For the kids who had their own local crews, it was strange and inspiring for this shop out of Melrose, Massachusetts to release this incredible skate video of people we’d never heard of, and reach as large of a viewership as it did. P.J’s part was obviously the main draw, and while there were many standouts — including Jereme Rogers at a time when his only musical connection was Buena Vista Social Club, Ryan Gallant’s east coast tech, the mean guy in the paper boy hat, and don’t get me started on Fiske — a particularly eye-opening moment of the video was when we were introduced to Alexis Sablone. Her part, in some pathetic way, enlightened a generation of young male skaters to the notion that females in skating existed outside of the only woman we had ever really been shown: Elissa Steamer.

I had seen Jaime Reyes and Elissa’s skating at that point, but something about the fact that there was this girl who completely ripped in a random homie video, reinforced the idea that there’s a grander female presence throughout skateboarding. It drew attention to women’s extreme lack of visibility in skating.

In the time since, Alexis is still ripping and placing in most of the contests she regularly enters — but what’s dope is that she also, like, fully went to Columbia, and has a Masters in Architecture from MIT. What’s even more wild, and a perfect example of the resourcefulness of people who happen to skateboard, is that she completely financed her education with contest earnings. I don’t care what you did down D7, this way of juicing of the system is the most impressive skate trick I’ve ever seen.

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You’re from Connecticut?

Yeah. I’m from a town called Old Saybrook. It’s a small town not that far from Groton, kind of the bottom middle of Connecticut.

Was there much of a skate scene there when you were growing up?

Not at all, or if there was, I wasn’t aware of it. I started skating when I was ten. I started at a new school that year that was a few towns over. I was in fifth grade and there were a bunch of eighth grade boys who skated, so that was my first contact with other skateboarders. It’s funny because, I had a skateboard, and I was still struggling with it for a while, trying to figure it out on my own. I was playing tag or something and jumped off this twelve foot jetty and broke my foot. When I started at that school, I had DC Clockers and was on crutches. All the boys were like “Whoa, you skate?” I was like “Oh yeah. Yeah, yeah, I skate.” But on the inside I was panicking like, “Oh man, I have to get good at skating!” As soon as I got my cast off, I was in the garage like “I’ve gotta figure out how to ollie.” They were cool, but mostly I just skated alone in my garage. There was this one skatepark an hour away, and I finally started going there. I’d make my mom drive me, or I’d take the train on weekends. I met Trevor Thompson, who’s still like my best friend. We started skating together every weekend.

When did you start going to Boston?

Boston didn’t happen until I was like fifteen. I met a bunch of Boston dudes — Jereme, Eli, Zered and Louis Sarowsky — at Woodward one summer. I became friends with them. Then, I went to Boston once with my family for a weekend, met up with Jereme and we skated all day. He introduced me to Matt and Arty, the Coliseum guys, and that’s when I met PJ. I started going there every weekend or staying there for the summer.

And that’s how you ended up accumulating a full part’s worth of footage?

Yeah, I don’t know if I’d call it a full part. I think I filmed most of it in a couple days, it was just random. It didn’t even feel like I was filming a part, oddly enough. Actually, most of it’s filmed at MIT. Then, we went on a road trip. We took this van down to Miami and stopped in Philly and Atlanta, so some of it is from that too.