The 2016 Quartersnacks Year in Review: 15-6

December 20th, 2016 | 1:36 pm | Features & Interviews | 2 Comments

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Keeping it moving with the new 10-10-5 format :) Previously in 2016: 25-16

Past Editions: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010

15. Astor Renovation

Two years ago, we lost a zen-like intersection of flatground that intertwined with all vibrant walks of life — the greatest non-spot in this history of skateboarding. It was, however, replaced with actual skateable obstacles this year: decent-enough beveled benches, a gap that replicated BAM’s ledge-to-street gap, and a Flushing-width flatground gap that Jason Byoun switch Muska flipped. The spot’s original meditative qualities dissolved into cement fairy dust, but at least it’s something to skate for now, even if the overall aesthetic of the new Astor Place is “we ran out of money.”

2014 New York Skateboarding Year in Review: 15-11

December 18th, 2014 | 5:20 am | Features & Interviews | 10 Comments

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Keeping it going. Part one is here and part two is here.

15. The Best Spot on Water Street is a Rock

The spot depicted above is the most frequently sessioned Water Street spot in 2014.

The gateway to acquiring skate footage in lower Manhattan held on for dear life until 2014, when a rock became its marquee tourist stop. Heading further south on this once heavily-treaded path will yield nothing more than knobbed remnants of a once thriving ledge-based ecosystem, those shitty round ledges across from the Veteran’s Memorial, and nary a dollar-menu for the broke boys in sight.

The 2013 New York Skateboarding Year in Review: 15-11

December 19th, 2013 | 1:43 pm | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

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Apologies for this being a bit late. We spent all of yesterday looking for the only dry spot in New York. Past installments here: #s 25-21, #s 20-16.

15. R.I.P. to an Empire, the Water Street McDonald’s Closes

For every great skate spot, there is an accompanying fast food restaurant: the Burger King down the street from the Banks, the McDonald’s up the hill from Pulaski, the Wawa by Love, or the In-N-Out across from Hollywood High.

Water Street was once the most heavily treaded road of lower Manhattan skateboarders; Pappalardo and Wenning’s days of going to Burritoville near Pyramid Ledges to sustain on free nachos are well known. But that place closed. The aforementioned Burger King is now a high end grocery store. The nearby Wendy’s was turned into a tourist center. And this past year, the final remaining destination for hungry, poor skateboarders, shut its doors. Skating on Water Street isn’t irrelevant just because all of the spots are knobbed — but because everyone except the top 1% of skateboarders (those with an above minimum-wage income any income whatsoever, who can afford a Chipotle burrito) have effectively been priced out, right down to food options.