Parent Magazine

October 16th, 2017 | 5:07 am | Daily News | 2 Comments

Photo via The Shady One

Yo the new full-length Gang Corp video is incredible. Impossible to watch it and not get hyped. Made me wanna go to midtown and hit spots we haven’t tried skating in years.

Damn, Delancey Curb was lit last night.

Please donate what you can to the Harold Hunter Foundation, which is doing a rout of fundraising right now. “A donation big or small will help enable them to provide mentoring, life skills workshops and college/career readiness activities for young people who would otherwise have no access to these vital services.” The best skater from New York is a H.H.F. alumnus so they’re doing real good work over there ♥

The Dominican government DMed Luis Tolentino and asked him to represent D.R. in the Olympics. Idc what your position on the Olympics is…that’s pretty beast.

Boil the Ocean is tweaking its business model away from long-winded musings on the world of skateboarding to give us the Uber of skateboard filmers.

The latest episode of Skate Muzik has a detailed interview with Eli Gesner about the music supervision from the early Zoo York videos.

Jake, Zered, Eli + Mehring go to a place not known for having spots and look for spots.

A minute of new footage of Wade D. skating Toronto.

Jesse and his dad went to Hawaii to film a video for Stussy.

The Tennyson Corp. put together a cameo-laden compilation of Jaime Reyes footage, the first girl I can remember seeing footage of in an east coast skate video. #respect.

Someone found a stash of photos of Pepe Martinez skating his driveway in 1988.

Spot Updates1) The long Philly step on Kenmare is a wrap. 2) The city quickly rebuilt the Triangle and it sucks.

Brian Kelley has spent the past couple years searching for all sorts of ephemera from New York City’s transit system. His collection became this massive book that is essentially the unofficial history of MTA merch. Worth every penny for any sort of New York history nerd or graphic design geek.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Get your shoe, man.

Quote of the Week:
Pryce’s 30-Year-Old Friend: “Oh yeah, I’ve read about Finstas and Rinstas.”
Pryce’s 16-Year-Old Brother: “Where’d you read that, Parent Magazine?”

Gonna use this day before 10/17 to remind everyone about “I pull up in a Zonda same color lasagna.”

Fulfill the Dream

October 9th, 2017 | 5:05 am | Daily News | 9 Comments

The Muska Epicly Later’d, in summary. After years spent pining for a Muska Epicly Later’d, and it finally existing, there’s now a vast emptiness. Who do we lobby for now? …wait, what if the answer is already in front of us? Standing in the right of the frame?

Although it’ll mainly resonate with audiophiles, Muska told the stories behind his ten favorite boom boxes as a supplement to the episode.

Genesis made a feel-good iPhone edit to wrap the summer up.

Bobshirt’s latest is with a [presumably buzzed?] Richard Angelides. Always enjoyed his non-rave music entry in Ty Evan’s 1997 rave film, and 11-out-of-10 trick selection.

Can’t tell what happened with this and why it is only going online now — as it was supposed to come out, like, literally four or five years ago (maybe they just waited for angst to start trending again) — but Death Video is now online in full. Features much, much younger versions of Tyshawn, Kempsey, Troy, etc.

With the potential end of Muni looming in the future, this was fun to watch (although admittedly, it is nowhere near as good the Big Three of Philadelphia skate spots) — The guys from Municipal Skateboards filmed a montage exclusively at the Philadelphia Museum of Art a.k.a. the Rocky steps.

The B.Q.E. Lot is set to be renovated by the D.O.T. at the start of next year, and it’s going to look exactly like that shitty space around the Flatiron Building with sandpaper ground and random rocks everywhere. Can’t we just get a ledge?

Online for the first time? The subway skating section from Colin Read’s Tengu.

A couple quick ones from Palace in the Puig era: Brady by Lucas, Lucas by Lucien.

Lacey Baker, Sarah Meurle and Josie Millard skate around Manhattan for a women’s shoe that Nike released. Max isn’t the only one who likes skating broken lampposts ;)

North Skate Mag has a chill interview with Mike Blabac.

“Does all this mean that New York is vanishing? Sure. But the deli wasn’t there forever, either. Vanishing is what New York does.” Roctakon’s brother wrote a rad thing about revisiting the Brooklyn delis that he had photographed back in 2008.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: This is the most Melo has passed in his career.

Quote of the Week
Torey Goodall: “What do you got there?”
Hydrated Gentleman: “A water.”
Torey Goodall: “An N.A? Nice.”

Remember

September 11th, 2017 | 3:39 pm | Daily News | 3 Comments

Photo by Matt Weber

Still a surreal day on the calendar every year. Over the years, we have done several posts regarding how that day shaped our tiny corner of New York — An Interview With Zered Bassett About the Vicious Cycle House (several blocks from Ground Zero circa 2002-2003), February 2002 Transworld Article re: 9/11, Twin Towers skate photos, Twin Towers skate clips 1996-2001.

You’re in for an onslaught of recap content throughout the internet, but the Dime Glory Challenge was absolutely brilliant. Forever grateful to be skateboarding on the earth at the same time in history as these brilliant Canadian minds.

Watermelonism has some new embroidered tees and hats.

“What was harder to do: switch big flip Chinatown Double-Set or switch backside flip D7?” NY Skateboarding has a solid interview with Tyshawn Jones, reigning “Did you hear what _____ did?!” king of New York City.

Transworld interviewed Josh Kalis about the greatest kickflip ever done™.

We’re the last ones to continue beating the dead horse of varial flip pontification, but the one (you’ll know which one…) in Sami El Hassani’s all-around brilliant new clip for Pop Trading Company deserves some extra attention.

People began skating the new Harlem skatepark on 114th Street and First Avenue (conveniently located between Haiji’s and Patsy’s) this past week. Looks kinda like Cooper Park tbh. Troy posted a clip from it, but there are a few more floating around.

Yaje Popson warms up with avocados and nollie half cab switch backside 5-0s. No wonder he’s the only native T.F. local with his name on a skateboard ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

People are still pissed about you skating the plaza on 110th and 8th, and hopes for a new Byrdgang video are high in the QS office. Here’s a teaser for Byrdgang 3.

(When is Hijinx 2 dropping though?)

Here’s the raw footage from Dane Baker’s part for Lottie’s Skate Shop.

Jenkem has a Prodigy tribute mix by skateboarding’s official Mobb Deep ambassador.

Four minutes of nollie backside 180 heelflips throughout history.

Vice posted up a deleted scene from Bam’s Epicly Later’d of Kerry and Bam skating Kerry’s backyard ramp in Pennsylvania. Party at my house for the Muska one.

Quote of the Week: “I can’t wear blue, it’s a color.” — Girl Wearing All Black in the Dime Store

Happy belated birthday, Roy Ayers.

Love Your Boys

September 5th, 2017 | 4:55 am | Daily News | 4 Comments

Please donate whatever you can spare to P-Stone’s Memorial Fund.

Manuel Schenck has a new all-Parisian edit for Supreme to commemorate their upcoming Nike SB Air Force 2. Features Nik Stain (!!!), Vince, Sage, Sean, K.B., Kyron Davis and Koston returning to gap skating at my favorite spot in the world.

The battle of the century. See everyone in Montreal this weekend?

Café Creme has a new interview with my favorite Wilson brother. It’s weird how QS has ran interviews for my second favorite Wilson, in addition to my third favorite Wilson brother, but we never got around to #1.

New Era has a lifestyle-ish clip with Tyshawn Jones pushing around Soho and Tribeca. You likely already caught it, but the Hardies Australia clip featuring T.J, Troy, K.B, Chopped Cheese, etc. is a good time as well.

“But even in his most powerful Diamond t-shirt, Chaz Ortiz can’t carry 2.7 million souls on his back alone.” Boil the Ocean reviews Realm, the latest video from Chicago’s Deep Dish crew, which came out last month.

Tennyson Corporation put together every appearance Rick Howard and Mike Carroll ever had in an issue of 411 to a four-song mega mix.

C.J. Keossaian, Sean Dahlberg, Hugo Boserup, Andrew Wilson, Nik Stain and John Choi traveled to the Westerly and Groton skateparks in Connecticut, and came back with “Jet Fueled Hog.” We did that once. Good times.

Frontside 5050 to nosemanual is maybe the last trick anyone expected to see on Pyramid Ledges from that period where the one side was unknobbed.

Heaps Chat interviewed A.V.E. about his favorite restaurants and least favorite streets.

Amazing they even got to ten — Village Psychic re: the ten best backside feebles on ledges. We’re particularly offended Torey’s Baby Steps ender got left out, but Canadian skate gods are used to being neglected by the #fakenews media by now.

Mark Wetzel’s Static IV part is now online. (Also an experimental 5050 guy.)

Assuming everyone already caught the 13-minute Hotel Blue promo that was on Thrasher by now? Nick also uploaded a quick bit of new Powers footage on IG.

Mac Kelly’s Terminally Chill 3 was a fun watch.

A talent for fakie hardflips and a song from a rapper who never had his music used in a skate video before, via Jeremy Murray’s 1/2 D.C. 1/2 New York Good Grief part.

Quote of the Week: “There’s nothing worse than having to explain a t-shirt to someone.” — Pryce Holmes

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It All Started With a Manual — The Skateable History of Columbus Park

July 12th, 2017 | 11:20 am | Features & Interviews | 14 Comments

Skate spots are living, breathing things. They shift with the socioeconomic climate of the time, and position themselves to best adapt with people’s needs. Skateboarding has always been reflective of greater society, so it should come as no surprise that our lives were pushed into Columbus Park as we began to get pushed out of the pricier, glossier haunts that we once frequented in lower Manhattan.

Columbus Park sits on ominous ground. It was built on top of what was once America’s first slum: a hotbed of vice, disease, murder and clashes for control that have been documented in many books and films. Though it would take decades for the neighborhood to rid itself of the notoriety it earned throughout the 19th century, the city built Columbus Park in 1897. A hundred years passed, and then a guy from Clifton, New Jersey came along. The park began its second life as one of the few downtown spots you can skate in 2017 without getting kicked out.