Big Up…To All My Haters

September 22nd, 2016 | 12:42 pm | Time Capsule | 6 Comments

dey-know

Shawty Lo died in a car crash early yesterday morning. No, Lo has no place in the canon of skate video music supervision. In fact, he’s exactly the sort of artist whose music geriatric skater types will insist you are using “ironically” in YouTube comments.

Quartersnacks has often utilized a #musicsupervision approach akin to a video like Trilogy: a 1996 video full of songs released in 1996, mirroring what the people involved in making it were actually listening to during the time. For that same reason, there has always been a special joy in major videos using songs that soundtracked a summer, or helped us power through a winter. I had an ear-to-ear smile on my face the second I heard the “I Love It” beat at the start of Biebel’s Fully Flared section for the first time. Even in those middle school years when RJD2 was cool, there was something validating about hearing it in Mosaic.

That same joy of skate videos using songs that pushpin memories into your mind doesn’t exist anymore. A mixtape will come out, and by the end of the week, there are three Insta clips to songs off it, and at least one new video in your YouTube subscription feed using the same tune for a trip clip. Nobody is going to skate to “Brocolli” in a major video next year, and if someone does, who cares.

It was the the start of 2008, and Jeezy hadn’t released an album in over a year. This was when he was at the height of his powers — the most effective motivational speaker on a desperate planet approaching a recession, and in need of a spark. To hold us over, he dropped Ice Cream Man Part 2, which included the remix to Shawty Lo’s “Dey Know.” The regular version was everywhere at that point: the horns were infectious, and the initial beat drop is the sonic equivalent of when the ball swishes through the hoop for the win at the buzzer. The remix gave it a second life, soundtracking every skate trip car ride that spring, and essential at the parties that we were able to sneak into.

Most skaters in 2008 didn’t take the Trilogy soundtracking approach. They’d rather edit to a Big L song, or a remix of a Big L song, or a remix of a remix of a Big L song remixed by a guy who specializes in remixing Big L songs. Someone skating to “Dey Know” in the year it peaked would’ve been massive; it’s the perfect fit for the second part of a video. In 2009, it would’ve been cool. Nobody skated to it until 2013.

Theotis’ part in the Shake Junt video isn’t particularly seminal or even well-edited. It looks like they slapped it together with what they had, but it’s the only thing I remember from that video. It made me remember those spring night drives to skate the Bridgeport ledges, and those nights skating midtown with the “Dey Know” remix on the iPod. Hearing those horns over any sort of skating gave me the same feeling of first hearing “I Love It” in Biebel’s part, even if Theotis’ part in the chicken bone video was nowhere near the generation-defining event Lakai’s was.

There hasn’t been as profound of a moment for one of those songs that encapsulates an entire season in much the same way since — probably because they only muffle under skate noises from iPhone speakers now, 60 seconds at a time.

R.I.P. Shawty Lo. Big up…to all my haters.

‘Go With the Flow’ — China Bro Cam Vol. 4

July 27th, 2012 | 10:08 am | Video & Remixes | 3 Comments

As skateboarding finds itself deeper in “everyone is good” territory, those at professional levels will begin to find ways of distinguishing themselves from the pack. Some will use flair, some will use fashion (see above), and others will take notes from the rapper handbook and do tricks with expensive jewelry, electronics (remember when rappers bragged about T-Mobile Sidekicks?), etc. in their hands. And since cameras are one of the the few expensive items skateboarders care to own, they are the easiest to relate. “So-and-so did a trick with $3,000 worth of electronics in his hand” is the new “So-and-so did a trick in a sick outfit.”

One last homie cam clip from a session at the Shenzhen Children’s Museum, best known to the western world as “that spot in China with the insane banks.” Towards the end, there’s another spot thrown in there for contrast, just so you know there are garbage spots out there that would fit well in New York. Features Omar Salazar, Justin Brock, Sean Malto, Theotis Beasley, Daryl Angel, Mark Whiteley, Alex Olson, Paul Rodriguez and Eric Koston.

Previously: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3.

Alternate YouTube Link:That was fire. Holla at ya boy.”

Have a good weekend.

‘Voilà, Magic’ — China Bro Cam Vol. 3

July 24th, 2012 | 12:44 pm | Video & Remixes | No Comments

Chinese beer companies are getting into griptape, too.

Nike just dropped a commercial they shot on this China trip back in February. Despite the joyous end result of the team having fun via point-of-view angles, industry rumors first projected a much darker production. The initial pitch was believed to be skate version of the Prodigy “Smack My Bitch Up” video, where you witness a night through the eyes of a mysterious SB teamrider, as he indulges in debauchery that exceeds the worst of every degenerate Baker pro wrapped into one. The original Prodigy video had a twist in which it revealed its protagonist to be a woman, so the skate edition intended to shock viewers when they realize they have been watching notable midwestern sweetheart, Sean Malto, all along. The company decided to opt for a less risqué approach, and thus the G-rated production you see today. (That was probably never an actual rumor, but it’d be sick if it was.)

Volume three of the bro cam below. Just goes to show that you can never be too far from the T.F. to skate a police barricade off a ledge, and then proceed to do four flip tricks on flat for the remainder of the line. Features Theotis Beasley and Sean Malto.

Previously: Volume 1, Volume 2.

Alternate YouTube Link:PLUTO…”

‘We still got China…and Cuba’ – China Bro Cam Vol. 2

July 17th, 2012 | 12:22 pm | Video & Remixes | 5 Comments

Volume two of China bro cam. More curbs this time around, and more spots that cause reconsideration of the bad rap communism has received these past sixty or so years. Any skateboarder would forsake even the strongest allegiance to brown pants, and put up with the drab olive clothing (appearance not important) in exchange for a place that drapes every inch of its public plazas with flawless marble. Features Jon Humphries, Kaspar van Lierop, Eric Koston, Didi Liu, Daryl Angel, Alex Olson, Jeremy Hu, Theotis Beasley, Paul Rodriguez & Justin Brock. (Last week’s clip here.)

Given people’s willingness to believe that Olson rides for a notable French fashion house and its line of four-figure griptape, what are the chances that this clip sparks a “Alex Olson on Shake Junt?” thread on the Slap message board?

Alternate YouTube Link

Shout out to Roy Ayers and Sporty Thievz. You got me blacklisted from Hop Sing’s?

’90s, dog.’ – China Bro Cam Vol. 1

July 10th, 2012 | 12:46 pm | Video & Remixes | 25 Comments

Best caption for the photo above wins a beer and a pack of white tees, or maybe a set of wheels (your choice.) This photo could also make for a great caption contest, but Instagram impresario, Tronmanjenkins, shut it down with “Creedence Clearwater Revivial,” which appropriately makes little-to-no sense.

This past winter, QS accompanied the SB team out to Shenzhen, China. Shenzhen A.K.A. Spotzhen is where a lot of companies with travel budgets have gone to film skate videos throughout the past five or so years, largely due to an abundance of marble plazas with minimal security. Nike has been running a four-week countdown to the release of a commercial they filmed out there, which includes photos, mini-doc videos, and B-sides that feature an ever-so-elusive Alex Olson switch maneuver. While most of the guys were out there doing things that professional skateboarders do, some of us pushed around the city with the SB China team. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be posting little bro cam clips from all of those sessions, all done in the QS-trademark cinematographic style (or lack thereof.) This one features Theotis Beasley, Che Lin, Daryl Angel, Didi Liu, Jeremy Hu & Justin Brock.

Alternate YouTube Link: Lumberjack mink, a bunch of Sno-Cones