An Inconvenient Truth

the storm

It is time that we, as free-thinking adults, own up to an inconvenient truth: The Storm is history’s greatest work of nonfiction. It might not be a sexy or popular opinion, but our most exalted skateboard heroes continue to steal from this much-maligned VHS tape for inspiration while no one is looking.

Dave Mayhew pre-dated the impossible’s modern redevelopment by a decade.

Chris Dobstaff pre-dated Fully Flared standardizing confusing tech tricks by eight.

Josh Kasper pre-dated Alex Olson inevitably doing an ollie over a DJ for a V Man fall fashion week spread by fifteen!

Anyone with half-a-brain knows there are some suppressed team meeting notes that considered the idea of a Plan B paintball trip to film male bonding filler clips for True.

And now, the Gonz — the Gonz! — is paying homage to the one and only Tyrone Olson in a new Four-Star clip without giving proper credit to the man himself.

tyrone-ramp-to-5050

Enough is enough. Why is it cool for the Gonz to do it, while the bro Tyrone continues to be ostracized from the conversation? Why should Mark bask in all the Tumblr reblog glory, while we sit there pretending like he didn’t watch The Storm late at night when everyone was asleep, and got inspired to bring a jump ramp to the rail?

And don’t say “Cuz he’s the Gonz.” Nah man, the Gonz is a Storm fan on the low, just like me and you ;)

Osiris shoes are boss, everybody.

The Events That Defined New York City Skateboarding in 2010: 15-11

Took a week off from the countdown, sorry. There will probably be two of these posts this week. Moving on with the retrospective…#25-21, #20-16.

15. The Dipset Reunion

It is no secret that video part song choices are crucial to developing musical preferences of all those who have grown up on skate videos. From the punk rock of the 1980s, to the indie shit that accompanies any emotional “skating is an art, bro” video of today, skateboarding has a much closer tie-in with music than traditional sports, whose typical soundtrack ranges from “Kernkraft 400” to “I Like To Move It Move It.” If you came of age in the early 2000s, the impact of Dipset, and its days of making era-defining opuses of ignorance, cannot be understated. The reunion was a beacon of hope for all of those who miss the magic that defined early-to-mid-2000s skateboarding — when the internet, skate plazas, reality shows, and awful rap dynasties like Young Money were not a part of the cultural landscape. The reunion was also a chance for New York rap to get another shot at the previous-decade-dominating rap comeback, as Wu-Tang’s return in the 2000s was hardly worth the attention it was given.

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