Frog Skateboards, Stingwater, Heineken & Hjalte Halberg Present — Came to Paris For Nothing

After millions of dollars spent on airfare and accommodations, nearly a full day of traveling over sea and land, and much meticulous planning that it takes to get dozens of boys across the Atlantic, we were in Paris asking the immortal question that guides our lives: “Where are we gonna skate today?”

About 70% of the way through the trip, Nolan revealed that the only reason he swam to Paris (he’s not a big fan of planes) was for the purpose of skating the famous colored manual pad spot seen in a myriad of skate videos growing up. Much to his dismay, when those “where are we gonna skate today?”-convos were taking place and the spot would get mentioned, the proceeding thoughts were familiar…

“I think that’s still under scaffolding?”

“Are there other spots around there?”

“It’s not as good as it looks in videos.”

“We gotta take a train to get there…I kinda wanted to push around today.”

See, it doesn’t matter where you are, or how many new spots you haven’t grown bored of skating you’re surrounded by. The struggle is real no matter where you go. The only difference is you might not be able to kick it with Sophie that day.

Watch below to see if we made it, or if we did in fact, come to Paris for nothing.

YouTube blocked the video is Canada on account of the fire George Michael song. Canadians!!! Here is a Vimeo link.

Edited by Hjalte Halberg. Features Keith Denley, Kadeem Walters, Nolan Benfield, Daniel Kim, Jesse Alba, Chris Milic, Hjalte Halberg, Andrew Wilson, and Zach Baker.

Web Premiere — Daniel Kim’s Stop Fakin’ 3 Part

“A few years ago, Daniel started showing up to Pulaski without his board, just to stare into the sun for hours on end. After a few months of this, he announced Stingwater.” — Smalls

After the release of Belly of the Beast, Allan Danze retired from skateboard filmmaking (because he was beginning to GRoE: Getting Ready tO Evolve.)

After the release of Spirit Quest, Colin Read retired from skateboard filmmaking (because, you probably suspected, he was beginning to GRoE.)

And as you may also already know, Stop Fakin’ 3 will be Smalls’ final video.

He is about to GRoE into a new chapter of life. Daniel was merely a brief spiritual guide on this vast journey.

GRoE-th is not for everybody. Daniel will be the first to tell you that people will misconstrue you GRoEing into convenient categories that their brains can easily process. Here is his four-limbed part from Stop Fakin’ 3, for all of those ready to evolve. You can purchase the Stop Fakin’ trilogy here.

It stings the face.

Related: Daniel Kim’s 2016 Q.S.S.O.T.Y. Interview

An Interview With Daniel Kim, the 2016 Q.S.S.O.T.Y.

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Intro and Interview by Zach Baker. Photography by Will-Robson Scott.

Will R.S: “I’ve never even thought to, let alone wanted to do a switch Japan Air.”
Daniel Kim: “You need to empty your mind, Will.”

Let’s talk about influence. Here, in this beautifully flawed American society that we live in, we delight in the idea that we’re all unique. Supported by our convictions that never on Earth has there ever been anyone like ourselves, we (as skateboarders especially) are quick to call out the bandwagoning of others; the adherence to trends that we ourselves, whether we recognize it or not, are also influenced by.

Whether it be “Yo, I ride 8.5 because everyone rides 8.5” or “Yo, everyone rides 8.5, y’all biters. I ride 7.5, I’m different and lit” — we are all borrowing from the same pool of small board brands, nostalgic IG handles, and tricks done in Trilogy. It’s tough to stand out, and perhaps the less a person cares about doing so, the better they are at it.

Turn to Daniel Kim who, within the past year, has gotten what some might call “weird.” Prior to now, he had built a reputation for banging flip tricks, remarkable pop, and thoughtful Pulaski lines. He was on 10 Deep back when German Nieves was the team manager, got boards from DGK for a while, and later worked at Nike for a couple years. Then, his hat started falling off, he grew his hair out, started wearing fur vests, and introduced to us his mysterious new undertaking: Stingwater.

Sparking endless laughter from many and bewilderment from many more, Kim, throughout 2016, threw up all kinds of cryptic promotion for what is maybe a water company, maybe a skate company, maybe just a platform for trolling his favorite skaters. What can be certain, as reinforced by his part in Spirit Quest, Colin Read’s trippy opus, is that Daniel, both as skater and individual, is evolving — no, groeing. I’m entertained by whatever the hell Stingwater is, and I’m still not sure that I even totally get it. Maybe my mind’s not empty enough.

Regardless, in our eyes, Daniel had done some of the most unique and remarkable skateboarding in 2016, earning him the title of Quartersnacks Skater of the Year.

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Some of the readers may be wondering: did you lose your mind?

Nah man, I just found it.

You worked at Nike for some time, and then in the past year or so, would you agree that you’ve had much more right-brained approach to skateboarding, than say, a few years ago?

I think I just got more psyched on skating. I saw that once you have a regular job, you can’t skate as much. So I started to appreciate skateboarding more. Once the Nike thing was over, I started skating a lot more, and I started realizing that i could just have fun with it.

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