Flying Cars

baker

Monday links on a Tuesday (again.) Photo via Gnarcotics on Instagram

“If everything is bigger in Texas, then every t-shirt is longer in Canada.” There goes our merchandise department’s plan for releasing front print Snackman shirts in tall tee sizes to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of Thug Motivation 101 next summer. (Might do it anyway, don’t worry. Fashion goes in cycles. Let’s get it…)

Whatever happened to the rasta skater? How has no one followed in Matt Field, Tosh, and Adelmo’s footsteps? New skate nerdery website, SMLTalk, speculates that the industry just got too fast-paced for that relic of the mid-2000’s stoned out #vibez.

Bronze affiliate, Dick Rizzo, has a cool “Mag Minute” over on the Skateboard Mag site, edited to one of only three classic summer songs by a New York rap artist released post-2003 A.K.A. when New York rap ceased being relevant/good.

Cue up two dozen kids with pomaded hair, highwaters and tucked in shirts trying double kickflips over the trash can at Tompkins this upcoming weekend.

Striking a pose after landing a hot move on a skateboard didn’t begin with Dylan Reider. In fact, it’s not even partial to sleek silloutted, fashion-forward skaters — hip-hop white guys might be the greatest practitioners of “afterbangs.” Kingpin rounded up twelve of the most notable after-trick poses in skate video history.

Boil the Ocean is creating a mixtape, in blog form of occasionally under-appreciated, breezy summertime video parts. Are we on the cusp of skateboarding as a whole rediscovering Second Hand Smoke? Akin to how the past few years seem like they’ve been influenced by people rewatching the old Stereo videos again?

Thanks Supra, always nice to sit through 1:20 of “lifestyle” for one Stevie trick and then another thirty seconds of links to your other videos.

“Do you regret doing the movie Grind?” “I could write a book on this question alone.” Always happy to see that C. Fro is doing well. Never forget caveman crook down Bricktown. Surprised “weird” skaters haven’t been quicker to adopt that one.

Wait, Habitat made shoes?

“What the fuck is that doing there? Who puts a garbage can on a rail?”

Quote of the Week: “Black people drinking Blue Moon just looks weird.” — Ty Lyons

Maybe not a “petition” per se, but we’re launching a Twitter campaign to try and convince O’Dell to get to work on a Muska Epicly Later’d. If you’re on Twitter, shoot him a message. Probably be nice about it though ;)

Weekend Viewing: Ronnie Bertino in Second Hand Smoke

ronnie bertino

What did you think this @ 3:28 was a homage to?

In Alex Olson’s “Five Favorite Parts,” he mentions how Video Days was a “myth” growing up. It was the video all the older dudes would rave about, but it’s not like you could go to the skate shop and buy a copy eight years after it came out.

Questionable was the other “myth” video from that time. Like any kid who loved Rodney Mullen because of Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater and the Rodney V.S. Daewon videos — judging skateboarding based on how many times the board flips — you’d hear about all the crazy shit he did in Questionable. Rodney’s 540 flip was one of the first three-second skateboard clips you could find on the internet in the nineties. But again, it’s not like you could easily find the full video. You had to get creative.

My first eBay purchase ever was a $19.99 Buy-It-Now listing for “ALL 4 PLAN B VIDEOS VHS L@@K.” The item arrived three weeks late, and “All 4 Plan B videos” meant that they were dubbed onto one tape in chronological order. Rodney’s triple kickflips and the real version of the San Francisco level from THPS2 were cool when you’re a tween, but in the YouTube-ized society of today, the only part from any of those four videos that gets routinely revisited is Ronnie Bertino’s. (Yeah yeah, Jeremy Wray obvs has the best part in the video.)

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