Ever Since I Left the City You Started Skating Less and Going Out More

palace five

Fall QS gear available at Supreme (New York + Los Angeles), Labor, 35th North, 510, Alumni, Atlas, Black Sheep, Civil, Commissary, Exit, Homebase, Homegrown, Humidity, In4mation, NJ (Hoboken + New Brunswick), Orchard, Palace 5ive, Pitcrew, Seasons, Select Skates and Uprise. Hitting Japan this week, Europe next well. QS webstore launches [next] Monday, November 2nd at midnight.

Ok, maybe this whole skating on cars shit is getting out of hand…

“Dare I say that the Dime Crew is possibly even better than Rick Howard?” Chris Nieratko spent Canadian Thanksgiving with the Dime squad. (Full Disclosure: They don’t celebrate Canadian Thanksgiving in French Canada.) Skateboard Story also interviewed Phil Lavoie about the inner-workings of Canada’s greatest fashion house.

Krooked in NYC video was a fun watch. You probably caught it already, but Brad Cromer v.s. trash cans is one of my favorite sub-generes of skateboarding.

Here’s a *new* interview with Ricky Oyola + and two video interviews from underrated faves: Chico Brenes for Route One and Brad Johnson for Bobshirt.

Purple keep coming in… 1) Volume 13 of LurkNYC’s “New York Times” outtakes series. 2) Materiél promo #008. 3) Cell Jawn #16.

Greg Hunt made an #uplifting mini doc about building a skatepark on one of the largest Native American reservations in the U.S, where youth suicides are rampant. Jenkem has some behind-the-scenes photos from the opening.

Even though it’s for more nostalgia-based reasons rather than actually wanting to skate there-based ones, there’s something chill about the fact that organized skate jams still go down at Riverside Park.

Weiger had my favorite part in either SB Chronicles video. The raw files are great.

Did you know there was an Alien Workshop video about to drop? Boil the Ocean did.

An interview with the guy who dreamt up the glow in the dark skatepark.

It’s insane that a trick that gets filmed and posted online on Saturday will wind up in an Instagram compilation video by Sunday. The internet, man.

Ok, no more #content about varial flips after this ;)

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Sooooo, Pelicans-Warriors tomorrow night? :)

Quote of the Week: “All my ideas suck.” — Nick Nunez

‘What Is Dime?’ — An Interview With Antoine Asselin & Phil Lavoie

dime-lotus

This originally appeared in Dank Skate Mag issue number 8. We felt this was worth sharing online, given the slim chance that you have difficulty obtaining Norwegian skateboard magazines where you live.

Dime is one of the greatest “things” in skateboarding. I say “things” because even they don’t exactly know what they are. A brand, a crew, a series of videos, something? Being funny is hard enough, but being a funny skate crew — without falling into the same overused tropes of weed and dick humor as every other skater on Instagram — is impossible. These dudes somehow figured it out, all while embracing the relative invisibility of Canadians in skateboarding.

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What is Dime?

Phil: It’s a bit different than what it started out as. Now, it’s a brand, but it became one accidentally. At first it was a crew, and we just skated together and made videos.

Antoine: It started as a shitty website that we never updated. We were fifteen-years-old, just posting shitty web clips. We started making full-lengths and it grew from there.

P: We sell some clothes, but it’s not really a clothing brand or a skate video brand. Everything we make is just for fun.

It’s kind of a good era with the internet and all to have the luxury of not knowing what you’re doing.

A: We’re not too sure what it is ourselves. We’re just going with the flow. I think people like not knowing what it is.

P: It’s nice being able to do whatever you want whenever you want. Whenever we have a good idea, we do it. Real clothing companies have timed fall drops, and we’re completely lost on that. We’re trying to learn everything as we go along.

Alexis Lacroix in the back: No definition, no limits.

P: Our goal is to skate. Anything to keep us around skateboarding. That’s what we like to do. I’m never going to become a professional skateboarder, so I might as well make something I want to do in skateboarding. Antoine makes money off his sponsors and all, but I quit my job to focus on Dime.

So, the goal of Dime is to keep you dudes from having real jobs for as long as possible?

A: To us, it’s not work. Now, we have clothing in stores, so we have to be more on point, but it doesn’t feel like work. We want to do this.

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QS in Print: ‘What is Dime?’

dime in dank

Had the opportunity to interview Antoine Asselin and Phil Lavoie, two of the principal figureheads behind Dime, for Dank, everyone’s favorite grown and sexy Norwegian skateboard magazine. We discussed their origins, the invisibility of Canadian skateboarders, Peace Park, the mythology behind Eric Reidl, and more.

In the opinion of our award-winning international low impact skateboard media institution, Dime is the finest skateboard thinktank in operation today. There are a few great companies and crews out right now, but there is no other crew that incites envious feelings of “Damn, why didn’t I think of that?” to the extent that Dime does with their consistently brilliant output. (Check yesterday’s “Legend of Joe Valdez” video.) They make you laugh, say “holy shit,” and hyped to go skate all at the same time.

For a sample of the Dime crew’s ability to do all three of those things, we compiled a bunch of their Instagram videos into one ten-minute compilation a la Worldstar.

Dank No. 8 should be available in the States soon. Theories typically stocks copies, and Labor has sold them in the past. It’s pretty much the only magazine worth keeping back issues of going today. This edition also has a cool Bobby Worrest feature :)

Excerpt from the Dime interview below.

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Why did you guys stop using the logo with the girl throwing up the devil horns? What’s the story behind her?

Antoine Asselin: That girl fueled everything there is to know about Dime.

Phil Lavoie: There was a website called DoYouLookGood.com, which was like a Hot or Not sort of website. You put a picture up, and people rate it. Hugo Balek sent us a photo of this young girl throwing up devil horns, saying “Check out my new girlfriend” as a joke. We go “Ha ha Hugo, nice one,” and forgot all about it. A few years later, my homie is going through my computer and finds a photo of that chick way down in my downloads folder. He goes “Who’s this?” and we started getting so hyped on her.

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