Octane & Chill — Dime Comp Volume 3

April 13th, 2016 | 1:48 am | Video & Remixes | 3 Comments

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Illustration via Charles Rivard, PhD.

It has been a long three years since the release of Turd Season. In that time, the minds behind Dime have created an unprecedented beast of brilliance — thanks in no small part to an ability to stuff sublime moments spent on skateboards into fifteen second IG videos better than any of their peers. With this week’s announcement that their upcoming project would be premiering at the end of April (no doubt overshadowing the other piece of awaited Canadian culture set to drop that weekend), we condensed the past ten months worth of Dime Instagram videos (everything since the controversial release of “Dime Comp Volume 2”) into a 14-minute compilation.

We’ve never traveled further than the skate from Tompkins to Sunshine for a video premiere before, let alone booked airfare to one. Hope to see everyone at this one. Flyer here. Video plays at 2:59 A.M.

Previously: An Interview With Bryan From Dime, What is Dime?

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An Interview With Bryan From Dime

June 17th, 2015 | 6:24 am | Features & Interviews | 30 Comments

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There are many unsung heroes in skateboarding. Local legends who never made it outside of their towns, skatepark builders who cede individual credit for the greater good, rogue bartenders who turn a blind eye to underage drinking at #skate #events are among them. But there’s one member of the skateboard family who truly never receives any credit: the warehouse guy. Where would Nyjah Houston be if not for the guy who physically takes his skateboards and Monster Energy memorabilia, and ships the box to him? Looking for a plank to drill eight holes into?

To give a glimpse of the skateboard-brand stock world, we hit up our Canadian friends at Dime, so they could grant us access to their always reliable and always smiling warehouse manager, Bryan.

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Tell us a bit about yourself Bryan. Where are you from? What was your upbringing like?

Hi, my name is Bryan. As Dime’s warehouse manager, I am a vital part of their supply chain process. I manage people, systems and make sure productivity targets are met. My goal is to make our customers happy. I love going out of my way to please strangers! I grew up in a small town called Kitchener, in Ontario, on a farm, as the only son of two very loving parents. My parents raised me to be a productive & happy person.

Did you always have a passion for stock? When did you first fall in love with packing boxes?

Growing up on a farm, I was always surrounded by little animals — cats, dogs, little chickens, & other meat products. Putting them in boxes really was a great source of pleasure for a young packer. Later, my love of packing evolved into packing more important things.

I believe the experience your customer receives when they order product from you should be flawless. If they ordered a size medium Dime Classic Tee, they should receive a medium size Dime Classic Tee. That is why I have developed the Dime Packaging Best Practices guide, as a tool that my team and I use to establish consistent packaging standards. By following these practices, I minimize cost and prevent delays, errors and damages. Failure to follow carton weight, size, or corrugated requirements could result in lost or damaged merchandise, delays, or additional charges and we’re not having any of that bullshit at Dime.

When did you move to Montreal? How did you come to work at Dime?

It was 2014, I was at a point in my life where I had to make some changes. Kitchener, being the hate crime capital of Canada, was a really negative environment and it forced me to make a choice. I moved to Montreal with my friend Jim, with hopes of a new beginning. We found our answer in the church [of Scientology]. I cannot overstate the value of Scientology’s teachings. We met the Dime guys at a “Cause of Suppression” class. They gave us a chance and hooked us up with entry level warehouse jobs at Dime. Through hard work and dedication, I climbed the corporate ladder and landed the warehouse manager position. Unfortunately, I had to fire Jim due to his alcoholism.

We’re Chilling Until We’re Not

April 20th, 2015 | 9:52 am | Daily News | 9 Comments

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Pete Thompson / @peetigga is the best skate photography Instagram going right now. Tons of unseen late nineties and early 2000s shots with many familiar faces. Stevie @ SF’s Third and Townsend bump from that archive ;)

An hour-long skate nerdery-laden conversation with Michael Carroll.

Life is goodie.

Diamond Days #80. That curb next to the Williamsburg Bridge is the new hot spot, huh? I dunno man, I’ve been away :(

“Resurgent bowls, abrupt transitions and even the vert ramp seem to have splintered handrail skating into restless and nomadic tribes, including displaced wallriders, wall-rejecting against-the-grainers, deep-crouching over-the-toppers, body varialing rewinders and a Mariano-bred stripe of small-bar uber-tech.” Boil the Ocean on handrail skating’s midlife crisis.

An interview with @Koolmoeleo, the guy who-more-or-less took the reigns from Chromeball as the leading skateboard magazine scanner on the internet.

Quadruples down the Stuyvesant Town rail.

Bronx-heavy clip with a Watermelons cameo and avant garde pants supervision.

Bobshirt interviewed Jahmal. (Chill shot of Jahmal in the Thompson archive, btw.)

New mini video from Cooper Winterson with a lot of still snowy streets, Welcome boards, and cutty New York spots that pretty much nobody else skates.

An unexpectedly high volume of Londoners are good at kicklip backside noseblunts.

Westgate ollies over a car and wants you to buy trees.

Congratulations to the city and skateboarders of Montreal on the full legalization of skating at Peace Park. “You have to be mentally strong to skate Peace Park.”

Meanwhile, in New York. Whatever, see you this summer, Europe.

So the diamond-plate bank on Grand and Centre Streets that everyone gets stuck at for way too long at least once every half year is a wrap.

Derrick Rose Pulls Off Perfect 720 At Local Skate Park.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: This post-playoff elimination Russell Westbrook YouTube mix with 60 views. It’s just not fair man :(

Quote of the Week: “I missed my flight one time, so I made myself take the A train back home from JFK as punishment.” — Sweet Waste

Though The Barter 6 has dominated the majority of rap-related conversation this past weekend, allow us to remind you that the QS Rap Desk’s favorite happy rap group has a new one over on Live Mixtapes. Travie’s had a quiet past twelve months, and it’s sad they weren’t allotted a Rae Sremmurd-esque super producer co-sign in like ~2010, but they’re still the go-to when you get sick of rappers telling you they’re gonna shoot you in their Alexander Wang gear. Praise be to happy rap music :)

‘What Is Dime?’ — An Interview With Antoine Asselin & Phil Lavoie

April 3rd, 2015 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

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This originally appeared in Dank Skate Mag issue number 8. We felt this was worth sharing online, given the slim chance that you have difficulty obtaining Norwegian skateboard magazines where you live.

Dime is one of the greatest “things” in skateboarding. I say “things” because even they don’t exactly know what they are. A brand, a crew, a series of videos, something? Being funny is hard enough, but being a funny skate crew — without falling into the same overused tropes of weed and dick humor as every other skater on Instagram — is impossible. These dudes somehow figured it out, all while embracing the relative invisibility of Canadians in skateboarding.

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What is Dime?

Phil: It’s a bit different than what it started out as. Now, it’s a brand, but it became one accidentally. At first it was a crew, and we just skated together and made videos.

Antoine: It started as a shitty website that we never updated. We were fifteen-years-old, just posting shitty web clips. We started making full-lengths and it grew from there.

P: We sell some clothes, but it’s not really a clothing brand or a skate video brand. Everything we make is just for fun.

It’s kind of a good era with the internet and all to have the luxury of not knowing what you’re doing.

A: We’re not too sure what it is ourselves. We’re just going with the flow. I think people like not knowing what it is.

P: It’s nice being able to do whatever you want whenever you want. Whenever we have a good idea, we do it. Real clothing companies have timed fall drops, and we’re completely lost on that. We’re trying to learn everything as we go along.

Alexis Lacroix in the back: No definition, no limits.

P: Our goal is to skate. Anything to keep us around skateboarding. That’s what we like to do. I’m never going to become a professional skateboarder, so I might as well make something I want to do in skateboarding. Antoine makes money off his sponsors and all, but I quit my job to focus on Dime.

So, the goal of Dime is to keep you dudes from having real jobs for as long as possible?

A: To us, it’s not work. Now, we have clothing in stores, so we have to be more on point, but it doesn’t feel like work. We want to do this.

QS in Print: ‘What is Dime?’

November 25th, 2014 | 10:42 am | Daily News | 3 Comments

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Had the opportunity to interview Antoine Asselin and Phil Lavoie, two of the principal figureheads behind Dime, for Dank, everyone’s favorite grown and sexy Norwegian skateboard magazine. We discussed their origins, the invisibility of Canadian skateboarders, Peace Park, the mythology behind Eric Reidl, and more.

In the opinion of our award-winning international low impact skateboard media institution, Dime is the finest skateboard thinktank in operation today. There are a few great companies and crews out right now, but there is no other crew that incites envious feelings of “Damn, why didn’t I think of that?” to the extent that Dime does with their consistently brilliant output. (Check yesterday’s “Legend of Joe Valdez” video.) They make you laugh, say “holy shit,” and hyped to go skate all at the same time.

For a sample of the Dime crew’s ability to do all three of those things, we compiled a bunch of their Instagram videos into one ten-minute compilation a la Worldstar.

Dank No. 8 should be available in the States soon. Theories typically stocks copies, and Labor has sold them in the past. It’s pretty much the only magazine worth keeping back issues of going today. This edition also has a cool Bobby Worrest feature :)

Excerpt from the Dime interview below.

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Why did you guys stop using the logo with the girl throwing up the devil horns? What’s the story behind her?

Antoine Asselin: That girl fueled everything there is to know about Dime.

Phil Lavoie: There was a website called DoYouLookGood.com, which was like a Hot or Not sort of website. You put a picture up, and people rate it. Hugo Balek sent us a photo of this young girl throwing up devil horns, saying “Check out my new girlfriend” as a joke. We go “Ha ha Hugo, nice one,” and forgot all about it. A few years later, my homie is going through my computer and finds a photo of that chick way down in my downloads folder. He goes “Who’s this?” and we started getting so hyped on her.