Ephemeral Moments — The Subway Tricks From ‘Mixtape’

February 10th, 2016 | 5:12 am | Time Capsule | 9 Comments

Before skating in the subway was an aesthetic direction you could film a montage around, before tricks underground went viral on mainstream news sites, and before we qualified what’s been done on pieces of MTA furniture, there was Mixtape. It featured the first shot of New York subway skating ever put into a skate video.

They were six B-roll tricks dumped into a friends montage, but they’ve kept a more permanent imprint in my memory than the majority of things I’ve seen in skate videos since. I’ve never made the walk between the L and the 8th Avenue trains at 14th Street without thinking about this clip.

Every interview with someone involved in the current *moment* of small companies touches on the “relate-ability” a niche-oriented brand is able to communicate over the might-as-well-be-CGI skateboarding you see in major company videos. In the years after Mixtape came out, there wasn’t a lot of relate-ability going around. Until the early 2000s wore on and innovations like IRC democratized the reach of skate videos, a company video guaranteed one thing: California.

Mixtape wasn’t just relatable because it was local, or because the skating wasn’t down big handrails. It meant so much more because of subtle moments like the subway tricks — they were as opposite of California as you could possibly get.

Who Do You Skate With in the City When I’m Not There?

October 27th, 2014 | 4:55 am | Daily News | 16 Comments

ashy

Season starts this week :) Daylight-saving time ends next week :(

1) You can buy copies of Johnny Wilson’s new video, Paych, for $10 here. Labor is supposed to be getting copies this week. The DVD also includes Beef Patty. 2) Living up to the “Most Productive Crew” trademark, those dudes already have another video on the way. 3) It’s mad sad that the VX is dead yo.

Amazing: Drunk dude calls cops on skateboarders, ends up getting arrested himself.

The bro Lil’ Lui has a video check out on the TWS site. Features footage of the 29th Street ollie from last week’s Monday headliner image.

Can’t remember the last time a part ended with a switch front shuv. What a great trick.

Not only are clubs likely seeing higher revenues on Tuesdays, skate videos are also getting made to commemorate 2014’s most on-trend day of the week.

SMLTalk listi-cized their five favorite friends sections. A notable snub / personal favorite is the one at the end of Mixtape, which pretty much nails the vibe you want any friends montage to have, not to mention features maybe the second best 360 flip ever done. Also, the Blind section from Virtual Reality belongs there off G.P. Mariano’s trick is incredible no matter what decade you’re talking about.

New Juicy Elbows clip up on YouTube. The ender is wild.

The 181st Street Park got a fresh paint job for its first birthday:

Rick Howard is on magazine covers again.

Gino + Dill + Kool G Rap + Manolo remix to commemorate new partnerships.

Backing the #musicsupervision in the new Matt Miller part.

Skating for Polar seems like it requires more heavy lifting than any other sponsorship.

Hjalte v.s. Aaron Herrington v.s. Joseph Delgado v.s. Brian Clarke in S-K-8.

Happy Halloween from Quan and Thug.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Bogut figured out how to throw mini Kevin Love passes now?

Quote of the Week:

phil

Rest in Peace Matt Reason. One of the main reasons people use the phrase “east coast” as an adjective to describe skateboarding.

Left the 7D at home, took the VHS camera out

March 28th, 2011 | 4:43 pm | Daily News | 32 Comments

The best web clip in who knows how long. While “summer in New York” clips typically embody a play-by-play ending off at the Courthouse Drop, the creative team over at Palace Skateboards aspired for something significantly different. The clip falls in line with the VHS nostalgia seen in projects like Gnar Gnar and Caviar, but blends it with token nuances like non-annoying instrumentals, Waka Flocka, Bun B vocal cut-ins, and other things more synonymous with the modern era. The skating is all sick, including many instances portraying the difficult pursuit of doing meandering street lines that don’t seem forced, or like, “weird, bro.”

While some asshole is probably on the internet screaming blasphemy at the re-usage of Jeff Pang’s Mixtape song, we’re supporting it wholeheartedly. Especially in light of the fact that that red bench ollie (at the spot that isn’t actually *the* Red Benches, but on the northern side of the building) is the sort of thing that would have been in a nineties skate video. On an anecdotal note, that particular song features Matthew Mooney’s favorite rap line of all time from none other than Keith Nut. Ask him what it is sometime, it’ll be a good conversation icebreaker.

(The real question is: Does Palace receive endorsement checks from Long Island University? And if so, how does it tie into the company?)

Palace also put together a Lucien Clarke compilation, featuring some of his This Time Tomorrow footage, and set to another nineties classic. Who would have thought that a British company would have cornered the more nostalgically inclined side of the skateboard media world and not come off as contrived.

Danny Supa Big Brother Interview from May 2000

November 23rd, 2010 | 12:53 pm | Time Capsule | 2 Comments

If you pay attention to conventional skateboard media, you may be aware that Danny Supa recently signed on with BLVD Skateboards. He’s got a new commercial over there, a new interview on 48 Blocks, and hopefully an ensemble of other new things surfacing in the future. The skate media world has been sparse in Supa coverage since his Nothing but the Truth part, which featured him grinding a ledge maybe two times. When you have flip tricks like those, that’s not exactly a bad thing.

Historically speaking, like many who spent the last golden days of VHS (somewhere around 1999-2001) constantly replaying the Mixtape cassette, and treating it as an outdated tour guide to what skate spots New York City had to offer (and calling Paine Webber “the Mixtape benches” for many formidable years of skateboarding), his part from that particular video has always been a favorite. If not for the top-tier backside flips, and successful only-5050 incorporating ledge lines (switch front 5050 180 out, nollie backside 5050 bench lines, and the like), than for the part’s status as probably the only skate part to be filmed mostly in basketball shorts, some of the most comfortable skateboard attire short of Polo sweats. Until your shins get hit.

The interview below is from the August 2000 issue of Big Brother, taken after a brief hiatus from skating for Zoo York. It discusses Guess watches, Ryan Hickey, and Mike Hernandez, so it’s worth five minutes of your time. All of the photos are enlargeable, and a text-only version of the images is at the second half of the page so it is easier to read.

1974 – 2006

February 17th, 2007 | 6:44 pm | Daily News | 17 Comments

It’s crazy that it has already been a year since Harold passed. Rest in Peace.

Underworld Element – Skypager – Circa 1993

Zoo York – Mixtape – Circa 1997

Zoo York – Vicious Cycle – Circa 2004

Bonus for all the Mixtape 1 and Wu heads: The full Method Man & Ghostface freestyle that was used for Harold’s part in Mixtape

I meant to put up a memorial post earlier, but this snow is making things really disoriented, especially when I woke up after 3PM for the second time in my life today.