Some Random German Links

April 10th, 2017 | 12:44 pm | Daily News | 1 Comment

futuro

Travel Tip: An Airbnb for seven dudes with one bathroom in Mexico is a bad idea.

Contrary to Instagram reports over the past week-and-a-half, the Banks are not *technically* open. A full section of the fence was down, and the DOT security booths were gone, but that section has since been put back up. Cops are still kicking people out (no tickets…yet), and claiming the space will soon re-open (also remember it was only supposed to be closed off until 2014, so, you know…) TWS caught up with R.B. Umali for a full status report, and a bit of new footage.

A bunch of Euro links for this Monday Links post…

Who would have thought that one of QS’ highest affinities for a non-New York skate crew would be out in Italy? Five-minute montage from the Milano Centrale boys, including #musicsupervision via Strap from Travis Porter, experimental pants supervision, and minimal tricks on objects over two feet in height.

Village Psychic threw together a remix of the extra-prolific “Sour Files” series, which has dominated the QS Top 10 perhaps more than any other single skate team.

A quick new one from Hjalte and the Blobbys.

/* end Euro links ;)

Always get a lil’ smile out of “Summer Trip to New York” edits that put the effort into skating midtown and SoHo, which seem to be antiquated routes in the L.E.S. + outer-borough dominant mindset of the past several years. The New York section in “Double Egg & Cheese” (begins at the 7 minute mark) is a fun watch.

Abada with some words on the enduring inspiration that is Mike York. (Related.)

They’re building a new skatepark at Van Courtlandt Park on 240th and Broadway. Also, it looks like they’re starting construction on the skatepark at Thomas Jefferson Park in East Harlem, with a projected March 2018 completion date.

Behind the scenes of Yaje’s Columbus Park polejam 5050 TWS cover.

Tennyson put together another 411 comp, this time for S.J. and Sean Mullendore.

Pete Spooner uploaded the New York montage from Insano.

Mike Blabac has a three-part series over on Slam City Skates’ blog about some of his favorite photos and the stories behind them.

A bit of new Anthony Correa footage in what is apparently a “VX Mode” on one of those Panasonic cameras.

Our bud Gianluca’s podcast “Skate Muzik” has a new episode with Jeff Pang.

Paul Coots started uploading single parts from BSA’s Whole Bitch video.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Who the hell would want to get a get a drink alongside somebody whose favorite basketball player is James Harden? Russ for MVP. Uninterested in any other arguments. Bye.

Quote of the Week:

quote

skaters

File Under: When sports fans start sounding like skaters.

Thank You, Mike York

October 16th, 2014 | 11:01 am | Daily News | 10 Comments

york noseslides hat

This guy is still putting out full parts…but what else do you expect from perhaps the only first generation Girl/Choc rider to contribute a full section in literally every one of their projects that he was a part of. Makes you wonder why the 30+, people-just-wanna-see-you-skate guys don’t lighten up and throw something out there more often. Gino sorta started to oblige us after Pretty Sweet, and hopefully the guys who share that special category follow suit.

After last year’s “two 360 flips in a row” / FTC part, York is back with a four-minute section for a company that most of us out east have probably never heard of. The dude is writing the book on how to make the third arc of a skate career fun and relatable to people whose ability is a few million notches below a Plan B rider’s. Even the current no comply and wallie renaissance makes its way to York — a dude who spent most of his pro career with those tricks being underutilized — so it’s rad to see him toss those in between the noseslide and crook combos.

The part’s brief stop in New York makes us wish he paid Three Up Three Down a visit, as the potential for an on-brand York line there is huge. No, he’d know not to wax it ;)

Tied with Scott Kane’s comeback part as 2014’s best underdog film.

Previously: Ayo For Yayo – A Tribute to Mike York, an Icon of Low Impact Skateboarding

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The Chillest Lines in Skateboarding History: 1993-1999, 2011-2012

October 4th, 2013 | 5:02 am | Features & Interviews | 48 Comments

chill lines header

Perhaps the only point in Alex Olson’s recent interview that did not polarize skateboarding’s sea of opinion, was his belief that nobody cares how hard tricks are anymore. We’ve all said “he’s good, but who cares” or written someone off as “a robot” before, so what do professional skateboarders have left to aspire to?

The line has long been the backbone of street skating. Skateboarder even published a print #listicle in the mid-2000s showcasing the best lines of all time. Appropriately enough, the latest entry belonged to P.J. Ladd, because his debut part was when progression really took off, and the “Everyone is Good” movement began to accelerate our numbness to incredible skateboarding.

“But what about style?” Sure, Ray Barbee looked amazing when only doing slappies and no complys, in a way that legions of art students have failed to replicate. Even Carroll’s library line — quite possibly the best thing ever done on a skateboard — wouldn’t be the same if it was performed by some midwesterner visiting San Francisco. Style plays a role, but remember when people would say things like “He’s so smooth?” None of that matters when everyone in a major skate video is “smooth.” Stylistic hallmarks have become less palpable because everyone skates and everyone is good. Everything was the same #drakevoice :(

A wise man once said “I don’t care how ‘good’ a video part is, all I care about is how cool it makes the skater look.” This list features the most timeless lines that were made so by the skater’s ability to make himself look cool, and not just “good.” They will stand out a decade down the line, even when each trick in a Micky Papa part is a go-to for fifty Stoner Park locals.

In a word, these lines are chill.

Ayo For Yayo: A Salute to Mike York, An Icon of Low Impact Skateboarding

March 13th, 2013 | 8:28 am | Features & Interviews | 15 Comments

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“All of my video parts, I had fun. I tried to be realistic so if you saw me, it wouldn’t be a letdown. I’ve seen video parts then seen the dude skate in real life and been like ‘Wow, he’s a video skater. He don’t really do that stuff for real.’ I wanted to be honest. This is my level. Yeah, my toe dragged. Yeah, that wasn’t high. Yeah, it was kinda sketchy. Yeah, I didn’t slide that far…But there it is. When you see me skate, I’ll probably land another one like that and you’ll be able to identify with it.” — Mike York

Certain corners of the QS office have long contended that Mike York had one of the best parts in Yeah Right! Though this may be a tall distinction in a video that ends with a 360 flip noseblunt down a handrail, our bias for low impact skateboarding is widely documented on the pages of this website. Noseslide-heavy trick repertoires are infinitely relatable; skateboarding will progress to bigger and techer feats, but for many, our ceiling is a shove-it and noseslide combination (or two 360 flips in a row.)

In sports, there is always talk of “good locker room guys” (ayo) — role players and veterans who provide personality and intangibles that build the character of a team. That’s something that isn’t as apparent with Girl/Chocolate in the Everybody-is-Good Era 2.0, at least from an outsider’s perspective. While the new riders are likely all great kids, positive, fun to have on trips, etc., a big piece of Chocolate’s appeal in the pre-E.I.G. era was how it had more blue collar skaters like Chico, Richard Mulder and York to fill roster spots around guys who were unequivocally the best skaters on earth. Nowadays, it’s only the latter, and yeah, it does get a bit exhausting watching seventy minutes of tricks one cannot even begin to comprehend.

(There is also the argument that the average skill level of a young skater today is way higher than it was ten years ago, so the skaters in videos that they find immediately relatable might just be unrecognizable to those of us accustomed to, say, the aforementioned three. Plus, please keep in mind that this is being written by someone who believes Ben Sanchez had the 3rd or 4th best part in Mouse…)

New Photos At Old Spots & Is There Such Thing as a Bad Photo of a Backside 180 Nosegrind?

August 1st, 2012 | 9:17 am | Features & Interviews | 26 Comments

This photo of Mike York at Pier 7 (circa 2003?) has been the wallpaper on the QS central command iMac for a long time. It is great for two reasons.

The era of The Great American Skate Spot is long gone, and we are entering a world where cities knob skateparks. Taking a photo like this will soon become close to impossible. A modern skate spot’s life span rarely affords it enough time to become so worn-in that a photo could showcase its every wrinkle.

To borrow a line from a great movie: “Politicians, ugly buildings and whores all get respectable if they last long enough.” The same could be said about skate spots. Johnny Layton might not have gotten a Skateboarder cover if he did an equal-sized ollie at a random spot in the Midwest, as opposed to one over a N.B.D. gap at the east coast’s sole remaining iconic plaza. Busenitz might’ve not had the same Transworld treatment if he backside noseblunted some curved ledge in Europe, instead of one that we have seen nearly every other trick go down on since the nineties, assuming that it was un-backside-nosebluntable. And it’d be tough to see a major magazine running a backside 180 nosegrind up a two-stair as a full-page photo if it was on a perfect marble ledge in China, and not on something that had over ten years of skateboard history eroded into its edges. Sure, older spots are convenient because they make it easier to qualify what has or has not been done, thus the larger frames of reference for the Layton and Busenitz photos, but a new photo at an old spot is treated with a certain reverence because it adds another page to the imaginary scrapbook skaters have for these places.

The other reason is based on a theory that there is no such thing as a bad photo of a backside 180 nosegrind. You can run a Google Image Search for the trick and almost all of the results, ranging from obscure European skaters to teenagers uploading raw DSL-R files of their friends to Flickr, will be good photos. Somewhere, there is probably even a great photo of Tyrone Olson doing one.

Until someone posts a bad photo of a backside 180 nosegrind in the comments and discredits this theory, a larger issue looms before us. The PWBC once famously resolved the question of whether white guys or black guys are better at fakie hardflips. We’re making a similar inquiry — Who is better at backside 180 nosegrinds, white guys or black guys? Consult the examples below.