Genesis Evans’ Part in ‘DANY’

December 7th, 2016 | 12:24 pm | Video & Remixes | 2 Comments

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Photo by Emilio Cuilan

“I didn’t know I was beast until I varial flipped a trash can.” — Genesis Evans

E.J. started to post bits and pieces of the DANY video over on his Vimeo page. You could still purchase hard copies of the video over at The Dany Store as well. Or if you want to get weird, we also saw it for sale at a barber shop in Japan, so…

Genny’s part is the first to go live, and it’s every bit as beast as sports analysts thought it would be when he was rolling away from the aforementioned varial flip. This video was what ushered in the wave of people skating the bad ledge at Houston Park again (also the inspiration for this post from March), so its chill to see this generation still keeping up with Anthony Correa’s business practices from Mixtape by placing a mid-line can on the pathway.

Alternate YouTube Link

Should be caught up on all holiday webstore orders today / tomorrow, and end of the years lists, best ofs, etc. will begin to go live shortly ♥ #sorry4thewait

You Was Just Another Ledge on the Hitlist

March 31st, 2016 | 12:14 am | Video & Remixes | 8 Comments

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You better wake up and act like nothing’s wrong.

Though analytics, Facebook likes and retweets weren’t particularly in flames for our research-heavy Houston Park post, it hit where it needed to hit the most: the streets.

The ensuing weeks resulted in comments and opinions from people at bars, skate spots, and around the QS office watercooler. The influence was also felt in that three consecutive days last week were spent at Houston Park — not just on its always #ontrend slew of construction-turned-skate obstacles — but inside its cast iron perimeter. We even skated the ledge for the first time since like 2004!

Bonus Genny line because anyone who skates Three Up Three Down as a Three Down, Three Up, Three Down deserves a special nod :)

The streets’ comments on the aforementioned Houston Park post also pointed out that the best trick on the bad ledge there was actually done by Billy Rohan — an omission on our part that is as embarrassing as forgetting Geo Moya on the “Greatest Noseslides of All-Time” list. In fact, much of the best New York skateboarding of the early 2000s occurred in this forgotten Rec Shop TV promo.

All Roads Lead to Houston — The Skateable History of Houston Park

March 11th, 2016 | 4:12 am | Features & Interviews | 3 Comments

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Skateboarding thrives on the meet-up spot and the skate spot. The skate spot requires an obstacle; the meet-up spot does not. And yes, the skate spot can double as both.

But what about the in-between spot — the proverbial comma of the session? It’s the place where you grab a bite, sneak a beer, talk shit, look at girls, kick your board around, and hopefully, summon the willpower to move on from ignore a “party on so-and-so’s roof”-text to continue skating. Astor Place was a one-time comma between downtown and midtown, but got phased out of popularity by the late nineties.

Even back when New York had actual low-bust plaza spots, Houston Park was unavoidable. In today’s current mode of cruising the Lower East Side until you hopefully maybe could find a propped up roadplate, it’s still unavoidable. Houston Park has metamorphosed with every cultural shift in New York skateboarding. What was once a B-list pitstop in the gilded age of unknobbed marble became a vibrant hub in this era of skating garbage and walls. We felt it only right to honor how far it had come.