Have A Bagel Alright Guy

July 16th, 2018 | 5:00 am | Daily News | 1 Comment

The Quasi video is now online.

“What’s the story behind Harold’s ‘Cheer Up, Bagel’ remark?” We finally learn the origin of the greatest sound byte in skate video history (“sometimes I wanna live and sometimes I wanna die” is runner-up) via Chrome Ball’s new interview with Dan Wolfe.

I C Y M I.

“The production numbers were so large that when I was on a solo trip to Korea tasked with moving production from one factory to the next, during a business dinner at a 5 star restaurant with the factory owner, I was told through a translator that, ‘The factory owner would like to inform you, that he can kill a man in this country and their body will never be found so you might want to change your decisions too.’” — Anthony “The Writer” Pappalardo tracks down the history behind the Osiris D3 with its designer.

Though he let up on the gas a bit since he got robbed for S.O.T.Y. by the third #big #rail #skater to get it in the past three years, Village Psychic offers up a mid-year remix video of Tiago’s stray bits of coverage to emerge these past seven months.

Jahmal Williams’ favorite skateboarder is Ray Barbee

Kyota remixed his part from Bot Video 2. Watch the full video here.

Rory Milanes = the new Chad Muska, and Thrasher posted their Palace in Hawaii article and photos online.

“Think of this magazine as a platform for you — yes, you! — to showcase what it is you do for skateboarding. Wherever you are. Whoever you are. Because as you’ll see here, skateboarding can really be anything you want it to be. It’s just a fucking toy after all.” Vice has an interview with the creators of Skateism, a magazine focused on nontraditional and underrepresented corners of the skateboard universe.

J.B. Gillett returns to San Francisco and Embarcadero for the first time since moving there all the way from France at the age of sixteen.

Jenkem runs down the history of Blubba with R.B. Umali and Steve R.

Hot take: midtown night footage looks better than 99% of cellar door footage.

Skate Muzik interviewed Mike Gigliotti from Lottie’s Skateshop in their latest episode.

You most likely caught it already, but Tao put together a southwest U.S. edit with Cyrus, Max, et al. for Nike SB, and I’ve had that Sunday night at Sway song stuck in my head all week.

Quote of the Week: “If it starts snowing tomorrow, I’m not even mad. Summer 18 has to end, g.” — Will Marshall

In an age of tuning out pre-roll commercials before skate parts, this line and song are still burned in everyone’s brain — it’s The Chocolate Commercial™, after all. The word “timeless” gets thrown around a lot, but it is hard to imagine this ever looking dated.

A Short History of New York’s Longest Lines

January 18th, 2018 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 10 Comments

Ricky Oyola, godfather of the east coast “filming a line via just skating random shit on the street”-practice, once expounded on his peak skateboard dream: doing a line through Philadelphia’s then-standing City Hall, into the street, up into the Municipal Services building, back down the stairs, across the street, into Love Park, through Love Park, and end at Wawa.

The closest he got on record was a line from the end of City Hall, through the intersection, and into Love Park in Eastern Exposure 2, but it did establish a lingering precedent for connecting spots. Apart from Ricky and that Joey O’Brien Sabotage 4 line where he starts at Love and ends up in the garage beneath it, spot connecting does not have a rich history in Philadelphia.

Or anywhere, really — because doing a line from one spot, through the street, and to another, is fucking hard. There are variables (people, traffic, pebbles, maybe two sets of security, acts of God), and a pressing anxiety of missing the final trick in an already-long line, which gets amplified by the fact that fifteen other things went right up until that point. As you will soon learn, spot connecting is something most people do for the sake of doing it. In the majority of cases, they stick to their safe tricks.

Like Philadelphia, New York is a dense and layered city. Many of its streets are narrow, and depending on where you are, three or four spots could be across from one another. New York never had a “Big Three,” but it does have three different types of benches on four different street corners, and over the years, skateboarders here have kept their third eyes open and far-sighted.

Skateboarding & Color Coordination — A Retrospective

September 6th, 2017 | 5:00 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

A #NYFW Special Report

Words & Interviews by Frozen in Carbonite
Photo Collages by Requiem For A Screen

Skating writ large prides itself on a “no rules, bro!” ethos. #Menswear, an entity with which skating has become increasingly intertwined of late (via Vogue Skateboarding Magazine, etc.), has all kinds of rules. No black belt with brown shoes. No wearing white after Labor Day. One’s tie can’t go past one’s belt. Skating has no such faux pas — except for MAYBE brand-mixing — i.e. one can’t wear a Venture shirt if one is skating Indys or Vans socks if you’re wearing Nikes.

But what if I told you that skaters have curated their own sartorial code for decades — painstakingly color-coordinating their shoes, shirts, hats, and even spots? However, the modern-day thrift store aesthetic has left color-coordination by the wayside, even as color-blocking seemed to make a comeback last year, or some shit. So, in conjunction with New York Fashion Week, enjoy this retrospective of color coordination while you’re waiting to get into the Wang party or whatever.

50% Of The Time, The Answer Is Yes

June 26th, 2017 | 5:00 am | Daily News | 2 Comments

Harold Hunter at the Bleecker Street Banks, 1994. Photo by Lance Dawes. Honestly can’t remember if this has ever ran as a headliner image before, but that spot has always stuck out as a “it’d be nice if that was still around”-spot, even though it was probably just a 2% better version of the McDonald’s Banks in Brooklyn ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Rest in Peace, C.J. Tambornino. “C.J. put the ‘G’ in genuine.”

“Don’t drive through Arizona acting like an idiot staying awake for days at a time.” The Bunt came through with what we’re going to dub “Everything you ever wanted to know about Brian Wenning but were afraid to ask.” The interview is brave, brutally honest, and a positive start to a new chapter in the life of someone we all looked up to as kids. Must-listen for anybody who came of age in the Photosynthesis and DC Video days.

A bunch of Canadians in Spain, with a handful of B-roll to “Yo, Best Idea.”

Always great to see new Philly Santosuosso footage, one of the hardest working men in skateboarding. (Always liked the way this remix came out, too.)

NESH” is a rad New York edit from Victor Garland, featuring every spot we were too lazy to venture out to when we had the “where do we skate?” debate yesterday.

There are mixed reports about the severity of the whole police situation right now, but be careful if you skate the new Brooklyn D.I.Y. spot. Apparently, *building* may be more of an issue than just skating. Max Palmer never hurt nobody.

Shout out to the Long Live Southbank organization for keeping ambitions running high. They started up a fundraiser (with a million dollar goal) to restore a section of the spot that has been closed and un-used since 2004. The promo video for it is sick. (And P.S. The Banks are never truly “back” until the city restores the small Banks.)

Philly is going from having three of the most iconic street plazas within one block of one another, to potentially zero by next summer. Place can’t catch a break :(

What would the internet be if it weren’t for remixes of Bloby Instagram footage?

The Mira Conyo squad threw a contest up at the 181 Park a few weeks back.

Jenkem has Tommy Koehne’s HYD video playing in full over on their site.

This seems like a fun way to spend three months :)

Why didn’t you chase her down dude?

The most common e-mail from the past week has been a size chart request for the QS swim trunks, so here you go. All sizes in both colors are still available — it’s a long summer and we stayed stocked :) Grab them before some guy with a job does. Also got a good size run in tees and some bags left. Thanks for the support everyone ♥

Quote of the Week: “In this day and age, it’s sicker to not get footage.” — Nik Stain

That’s A Crazy One

June 14th, 2017 | 5:17 am | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

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Imagery from New York skateboarding’s most romanticized decade is finite. The city spent half of the nineties without an industry, so all the existing artifacts have been reblogged, reposted and #TBT-ed a million times — Zoo, Kids, Ari Marcopoulos’ Metropolitan ads, a couple early 411 or Transworld montages, and then it runs scarce.

What does remain is people’s private collections (e.g. you may remember the homemade SkateNYC videos that made their way online back in 2011.) High and Mel Stones are two girls who grew up alongside many of the names you’d immediately associate with that era of skateboarding in New York, touting a camera from their respective school photography programs along with them. After posting outtakes on their Instagram over the past year, they are releasing a book of personal photographs from those years to celebrate the lifelong friendships they created in that time. We asked Mel to caption some of those images. The book can be purchased on ThatsACrazyOne.com, and all proceeds will be donated to the photo department at Lincoln High School in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn.