Hit An Island Like Gilligan

January 25th, 2016 | 2:18 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

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Hey, what else is there to do? Shorty’s Fulfill the Dream on Vimeo.

The two guys who skated from Boston to New York skated from New York to Philly this past summer. The Backstreet Atlas Guide to New Jersey premieres on Thursday, January 29 at 7 P.M. Kinfolk Studios, 94 Wythe Ave in Brooklyn. Flyer here.

Green Zine interviewed Connor about the QS + DGK project.

This guy snorted a line of cocaine and then crooked grinded a 12 stair railThis will blow your mind.” Every now and then, Slap comes through with unparalleled levels of brilliance: 2016 Ride Channel Title Predictions.

Someone went and took all the raw Max Palmer outtake footage from Johnny’s video blogs, and turned it into a fun part edited to one of the aughts’ flirtiest love songs :)

“Whereas Lennie Kirk fused spirituality with a certain on- and off-board brutality, Jereme Rogers proffers an elixir of wealth-seeking Christianity and shameless excess that seems suited to Las Vegas’ neon-heated Gamblor lairs, all-u-can-consume buffets and drive-thru wedding chapels.” Boil the Ocean on 5BNY, Vase, geographic anchors, and re-re-re-starting Jereme Rogers’ career.

Speaking of 5BNY, here’s thirty seconds of new Silvester Eduardo footage for Venture.

Said this almost exactly one year ago, but is worth repeating: Michael Mackrodt is on the shortlist of most impressive pros to see skate in real life. Watching him do lines in the unskated land of West Africa for five minutes is the next best thing ;)

Our friends at Shorty’s put together a video of the spot throughout 2015 in the stylings of Cash Money Records’ greatest exercise in cinéma vérité:

Hundred band, hundred bandFifteen seconds of new [indoor] Wade D. footage!

Fifteen seconds of new [indoor] Gino footage!

More than a few seconds of new Caddo footage!

The perfection of imperfection with Mike Maldonado.

Mambo Bar — The 270 Out Capital of New York City.

Frog Skateboards is real dude.

QS Sports Desk:Never have two teams with as high a combined winning percentage as San San Antonio (38-6) and Golden State (40-4) met this far into the season.”

Quote of the Week: “I’m a skater, I’m not a squirrel suit guy.” — Cyrus Bennett

For us, Ziegfeld died in 2011, but double R.I.P. to Ziegfeld.

Gang Starr, Skate Videos & the 90s

April 19th, 2011 | 10:33 am | Time Capsule | 22 Comments

April 19th marks one year since Keith “Guru” Elam passed away. While there are plenty of sites to read about the impact of his music on a grand scale, the fact that Gang Starr probably occupies the upper tier of “Most Songs to Appear in Skate Videos Throughout the Nineties,” if you were to tally up individual artist appearances (at least as far as rap is concerned), will receive zero mention.

If you’re currently in your late-teens or early-twenties, you most likely began skating in a period bookended by Fulfill the Dream (1998) and Yeah Right (2003). In a time before the internet became a daily onslaught of new music, and you had to ration your money between skate videos and actually purchasing CDs (or scouring Limewire, Kazaa, or whatever spyware-infested file sharing service you chose to use back then), skate videos themselves provided a window to music / rap that wasn’t necessarily on BET, MTV, The Box, etc., or older songs that you were too young to have experienced when they were actually released. You didn’t necessarily have to be one of those kids who organized their first iPod by skate video title as opposed to album, but it’s hard to deny that videos played a much larger role in shaping music discovery ten-plus years ago than they do now, when everything is available. Without the internet, or the presence of an older, more knowledgeable sibling, skate videos introduced plenty of nine, ten, and eleven-year-olds in that period to rap that did not necessarily begin with shiny suit era Bad Boy and end at Jay-Z. (Although it is a shame that skate video soundtracks shunned the “Tunnel Banger” sub-genre at its height.)

One of those key moments was Steve Olson’s part in Fulfill the Dream, which introduced me, and a whole bunch of kids just like me, to Gang Starr, as our formative years of becoming pop culture / musically aware occurred in that four-year drought between Hard to Earn and Moment of Truth.

“Above the Clouds” came from what would be the last great Gang Starr record, but there was an extensive period preceding 1998, when the group’s music was in a whole grip of 411s and a slew of memorable company video parts as well.