Sundays Are Too Fun ©

August 14th, 2017 | 2:53 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

Via @rumoursandlies on Instagram

We made some fast Snackman tees with our friends at Dime. Available now at their store in Montreal, and available tomorrow at 8 P.M. E.S.T. on their webstore.

Also on that note, Monster Children has a quick preview of this year’s upcoming Glory Challenge. “Pretty stoked to use pyrotechnics this year.”

Eric Koston filmed everyone’s favorite Russian skateboarder and back smither do a line at my favorite skate spot on planet earth. It ends with a back smith.

Here is a thirteen-minute-long mega mix of any and all 917 affiliates’ footage (Cyrus, Max, Genny, Nyjah, etc.) that has been pulled off various Instagram depositories. Only just over a month until we figure out whether or not Logan is lying to us!

A new trailer for Sabotage 5, which will be, as strange as it sounds to say, the final Love Park video. Due out on DVD and VHS on September 29.

Vogue Skateboard Magazine has a rare, detailed profile on Supreme.

Skateboarders have been responsible for some horrendous, phoned-in art in their day, especially as they’ve lapsed away from actual skating — BUT we can all agree the most #subversive, #disruptive, and #iconic skate art can be found in the contentious world of skatepark graffiti. TBH, we should start doing Tompkins graffiti updates.

Nine minutes of raw footage from steezy underweight guy and ABC ledge survivalist, Nick Ferro, as derived from Grand Collection’s “Buggy” video.

Are people still allowed to ollie into ledge tricks on Instagram?

And with this video, @nextlevelkook A.K.A. Tyler Warren has taken the throne as IG’s finest auteur. Dutchmaster Delaney and Kevin Tierney are still up there though.

That short-lived manual pad at the Escape From New York cathedral on Amsterdam is no more. They put a rail around the corner, but that hasn’t stopped people from filming enders there.

Airdropping dick pics to people on the subway is pretty foul, but yo, now you can AirDrop your footy tape all over Agenda, Tampa AM, etc. to get on.

Quote of the Week: “Did I ever tell you about the time I was seven hours early to work but still three hours late?” — Keith Denley

An Interview With Jamal Smith

August 17th, 2016 | 10:33 am | Features & Interviews | 9 Comments

WorldChampion_Jamal

Photo by Nathan Éthier-Myette

Words by Zach Baker

Becoming a professional skateboarder seems pretty tough. You have to get really good at it, but it’s not about who’s the best. Everyone is too good for us to tell the difference at this point. The people who sustain themselves in skateboarding the longest are those with charisma and moxie — “something else.”

Jamal Smith has been exemplary in this regard, pretty much since the invention of YouTube. He finessed himself into the public eye with the Tornado Spin trick tip ten years ago. But, as evidenced by his Sabotage 4 opener, the new Palace clip, his pre-Glory Challenge pseudo-prize fighter Instagram campaign, and most importantly, getting on Stingwater, the dude has been especially feeling it as of the past year or so. I checked in with him outside of the Glory Challenge trying to roll a joint in the wind. He had just suffered a heart-wrenching loss to Wade Desarmo — but he was fine with it. His phone was blowing the fuck up. They both won.

+++++++

You just skated against defending titleholder Wade Desarmo in the the Dime World Championship Game of S.K.A.T.E. What was it like going into that for you?

It’s all about theatrics. At the end of the day, if you can put on a good show, it doesn’t matter who comes in first or last. But I mean, of course I wanted that $150,000 or whatever the fuck these Dime niggas are joking about. I was nervous as fuck though. I know I can’t kickflip and this nigga has all the kickflips.

When you saw the kickflip, what was going through your mind?

It was like everything went in slow motion. I felt every drop of sweat running down my face, I saw all the reactions, all the eyes on me. I had to turn inward, and I knew I was fucked.

You rattled off a couple tricks, right?

Yeah, because I’m that nigga. You spin to win. Unfortunately, I didn’t win.

Do you hope to battle him again next year?

Hell no. I’m just trying to smoke everybody else’s weed and watch motherfuckers huck their bodies down the biggest gaps onto swords and numchucks.

You live in Philadelphia?

Yeah, I’m originally from Ohio. I lived there until I was like 11. Then I lived in Massachusetts, and I lived in Ithaca [New York] after that.

Why’d you move around?

My mom passed when I was 11. I was a ward of the state, which meant I had no legal guardian and I had to stay in Ohio until I found someone who would take care of me. At the time, my sister was living in Massachusetts and took me in. I lived in Northampton, some weird little area in Western Massachusetts.

Did you start skating there?

Yeah, I want to say that I was maybe 14 when I started to really get into it. 11 to 13, I was on my Rocket Power shit, riding rollerblades, bikes, whatever the fuck, I didn’t care.

Embracing Unreality — The 2016 Dime Glory Challenge

August 10th, 2016 | 12:43 pm | Features & Interviews | 13 Comments

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Words and Photos by Zach Baker

“I love Montreal so much, but every time I come here, I’m such a piece of shit.” — Jersey Dave

Skateboarding is all spectacle, but I understand that you’re up in arms about the International Olympic Committee treating it like the highly-commercialized mainstream sport that it is. You’re asking “how can you even judge skateboarding? It’s art, bro.”

Dime, in the Canadian tradition of being smarter, funnier and better at skateboarding than us, addressed this dilemma long before Tokyo 2020 was even a discussion. But still, we’re here deciding which kickball court to skate piles of refuse in, pleading, “how could they do this to us? This isn’t the 200 meter backstroke…this is skateboarding!” Yes, aside from the fact that smoking weed makes you better at it, skateboarding has very little in common with competitive swimming.

As descendants of the land that brought us the Montreal Screwjob, Bret “The Hitman” Hart, and Robert “Sluggo” Boyce, the Dime boys recognized what the future of skateboard events could and should look like. Let me tell you, it looks a lot like professional wrestling.

Late Start…

August 24th, 2015 | 4:39 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

snackman

^This thing is at 50 Kent (@ N 11th Street) for a lil’ bit.

The Alltimers webstore is now live with new boards, hats and tees.

Ok, no more skating rails in the 6XL QS tees. (Labor still got them hehe.)

Reportpotholes.org is a new, Jersey-based website centered around a single featured clip a la the defunct Popills.com. Via the same dudes who brought you In Crust We Trust and Brick City Street Styles. The first one is solid.

New part from the always underrated Ron Deily — though you wonder if he finally starts getting the credit he has long deserved given today’s no comply and wallie-favoring political climate. (This one is another personal favorite.)

Free Skate Mag interviewed another oft-underrated New Jersey legend, Pete Eldridge — one of the few guys to successfully pull off a comeback in skateboarding, and winner of the 2012 Q.S.S.O.T.Y. award (for a single line.)

Village Psychic came through with a four-minute Jordhan Trahan remix, that probably stands as his most comprehensive full “part” to-date.

Michael Carroll (who turns 40 today), does a frontside kickflip over a mini picnic table at the 3:30ish mark of this clip from the Stay Flared tour.

Backing 50 Cent #musicsupervision for a 2015 video part. Miss the guy :(

More terrible skateparks!

Usually not into internet writing that tells me “WHY ______ IS IMPORTANT,” but SMLTalk is spot on re: the virtues of the Dime Glory Challenge.

The Blabac x Stevie photos are among the best skate photos that exist.

The only thing I remember from Mountain Dew: The Movie is Tiago Lemos’ footage and everyone unanimously agreeing that he is now the best skateboarder alive, so you should watch his Gold Goons section again.

Ummmmmmmmmm

Quote of the Week

Esco dancing is truly life altering.