Blue Sofa

September 18th, 2017 | 1:27 pm | Daily News | 3 Comments

Colin Sussingham has been posting a bunch of photographs from the 917 video over on The Local Weather. The Max photo above is stolen from there obvs.

Here is a YouTube link to the 917 video, for all those averse to fringe video players. Still overwhelmed by how contagiously good vibes that entire video is.

So sick of the being bad at skateboarding on purpose trend.

“What’s the hardest trick in skateboarding?” “Getting a job.” There’s been a relatively decent batch of content about skateboarding’s most difficult maneuver floating around this past week: Heath Kirchart ranks all the jobs he’s had since retiring from pro skateboarding + Brandon Westgate talks about lumber mills and cranberries.

Brian Panebianco made an eleven minute documentary that highlights one of the bonds that formed between a homeless Love Park local and the park’s skateboarders.

The new Gang Corp edit is sick.

“Unlike Alien Workshop, DC recognized a new generation preparing to don swishy pants and opened its East Coast flow spigots, and now spot-searching Droors-endorser John Shanahan helps DC find a path after long years of wandering.” Boil the Ocean dwells on how DC is re-routing its approach to the skate shoe landscape.

Bill Strobeck put together a VX best-of edit from roughly 2000-2004 for Thrasher.

Cafe Creme has an interview with #QSTOP10 fave, Magnus Bordewick.

Gotta respect a “D.C. to Boston” edit that completely skips New York. This place can be a real pain in the ass, but at least we got an hour at Big Screen Plaza yesterday.

Rob Campbell footage will never not get a link ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Skate Jawn made a Glory Challenge edit with a bit of street skating mixed in.

Spot Updates: The banks under the 125th Street 1 train station have been under construction for a year or two. The oft-skated ones on the south side of 125th have a massive curb at the start now, but you can skate one on the north side of the street — although someone’s going to need to throw some Bondo on that crack right before it.

Quote of the Week
Jason Byoun: “I’m depressed yo.”
Inquisitive Gentleman: “Why?”
Jason Byoun: “Summer’s over yo.”

On Skateboarding As Sport As Stupid — The 2017 Dime Glory Challenge

September 15th, 2017 | 2:46 pm | Features & Interviews | 11 Comments

Words & Photos by Zach Baker

As the cloud of loud begins to dissipate from the stimulation of last week’s festivities up in Montreal, it is time to reflect. Tony Soprano once said, “I feel like King Midas in reverse, everything I touch turns to shit.” Since their inception, the Dime boys have proven to be a bunch of full-blown regular ass speed King Midases. There has not been a single public offering — be it a bowling montage, full-length skate video, a collab baby, or any of the annual skateboarding competitions to which they’ve played host the past three years — that has not gone off without a hitch. But this year’s Glory Challenge, with the newfound aide of DC Shoes, was more frivolous than anyone anticipated. DC, recently reclaimed by one of its original co-founders, weighed in hard with their trademark mountain of money, bringing the spectacle to a new echelon. We’re talking renting Wade D. a Ferrari and a helicopter for an Instagram post, a pyrotechnics exhibition that was described as “a buffet of fire,” renting ten limos to go bowling, and throwing a carnival-esque block party DJed by Darude that felt like a billionaire kid’s freakin’ quinciñera. These and every other tiny, speed shade-tinted detail amount to, from where I’m standing, the most expensive joke ever.

This long weekend of overstimulation has left us still unpacking all that happened. So these guys went out, invested all this effort, capital, manpower, organization…for…a joke? It took these boys the better part of a year to plan. Bryan worked tirelessly for weeks on end to construct the many rooms and modifiable obstacles of this year’s Glory Challenge. Legends like Tiago, Biebel, Kalis and Forrest Edwards were flown from the extremes of the continent to be in attendance…for a weekend of laughs? Listen — I’m no Miscavage, I don’t have all the answers — but the spectacle has left thousands of people at once psyched, inspired, shocked, and confused.

Love Your Boys

September 5th, 2017 | 4:55 am | Daily News | 4 Comments

Please donate whatever you can spare to P-Stone’s Memorial Fund.

Manuel Schenck has a new all-Parisian edit for Supreme to commemorate their upcoming Nike SB Air Force 2. Features Nik Stain (!!!), Vince, Sage, Sean, K.B., Kyron Davis and Koston returning to gap skating at my favorite spot in the world.

The battle of the century. See everyone in Montreal this weekend?

Café Creme has a new interview with my favorite Wilson brother. It’s weird how QS has ran interviews for my second favorite Wilson, in addition to my third favorite Wilson brother, but we never got around to #1.

New Era has a lifestyle-ish clip with Tyshawn Jones pushing around Soho and Tribeca. You likely already caught it, but the Hardies Australia clip featuring T.J, Troy, K.B, Chopped Cheese, etc. is a good time as well.

“But even in his most powerful Diamond t-shirt, Chaz Ortiz can’t carry 2.7 million souls on his back alone.” Boil the Ocean reviews Realm, the latest video from Chicago’s Deep Dish crew, which came out last month.

Tennyson Corporation put together every appearance Rick Howard and Mike Carroll ever had in an issue of 411 to a four-song mega mix.

C.J. Keossaian, Sean Dahlberg, Hugo Boserup, Andrew Wilson, Nik Stain and John Choi traveled to the Westerly and Groton skateparks in Connecticut, and came back with “Jet Fueled Hog.” We did that once. Good times.

Frontside 5050 to nosemanual is maybe the last trick anyone expected to see on Pyramid Ledges from that period where the one side was unknobbed.

Heaps Chat interviewed A.V.E. about his favorite restaurants and least favorite streets.

Amazing they even got to ten — Village Psychic re: the ten best backside feebles on ledges. We’re particularly offended Torey’s Baby Steps ender got left out, but Canadian skate gods are used to being neglected by the #fakenews media by now.

Mark Wetzel’s Static IV part is now online. (Also an experimental 5050 guy.)

Assuming everyone already caught the 13-minute Hotel Blue promo that was on Thrasher by now? Nick also uploaded a quick bit of new Powers footage on IG.

Mac Kelly’s Terminally Chill 3 was a fun watch.

A talent for fakie hardflips and a song from a rapper who never had his music used in a skate video before, via Jeremy Murray’s 1/2 D.C. 1/2 New York Good Grief part.

Quote of the Week: “There’s nothing worse than having to explain a t-shirt to someone.” — Pryce Holmes

Who you got?

  • Wade (52%, 208 Votes)
  • Tiago (48%, 194 Votes)

Total Voters: 402

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Sundays Are Too Fun ©

August 14th, 2017 | 2:53 pm | Daily News | 2 Comments

Via @rumoursandlies on Instagram

We made some fast Snackman tees with our friends at Dime. Available now at their store in Montreal, and available tomorrow at 8 P.M. E.S.T. on their webstore.

Also on that note, Monster Children has a quick preview of this year’s upcoming Glory Challenge. “Pretty stoked to use pyrotechnics this year.”

Eric Koston filmed everyone’s favorite Russian skateboarder and back smither do a line at my favorite skate spot on planet earth. It ends with a back smith.

Here is a thirteen-minute-long mega mix of any and all 917 affiliates’ footage (Cyrus, Max, Genny, Nyjah, etc.) that has been pulled off various Instagram depositories. Only just over a month until we figure out whether or not Logan is lying to us!

A new trailer for Sabotage 5, which will be, as strange as it sounds to say, the final Love Park video. Due out on DVD and VHS on September 29.

Vogue Skateboard Magazine has a rare, detailed profile on Supreme.

Skateboarders have been responsible for some horrendous, phoned-in art in their day, especially as they’ve lapsed away from actual skating — BUT we can all agree the most #subversive, #disruptive, and #iconic skate art can be found in the contentious world of skatepark graffiti. TBH, we should start doing Tompkins graffiti updates.

Nine minutes of raw footage from steezy underweight guy and ABC ledge survivalist, Nick Ferro, as derived from Grand Collection’s “Buggy” video.

Are people still allowed to ollie into ledge tricks on Instagram?

And with this video, @nextlevelkook A.K.A. Tyler Warren has taken the throne as IG’s finest auteur. Dutchmaster Delaney and Kevin Tierney are still up there though.

That short-lived manual pad at the Escape From New York cathedral on Amsterdam is no more. They put a rail around the corner, but that hasn’t stopped people from filming enders there.

Airdropping dick pics to people on the subway is pretty foul, but yo, now you can AirDrop your footy tape all over Agenda, Tampa AM, etc. to get on.

Quote of the Week: “Did I ever tell you about the time I was seven hours early to work but still three hours late?” — Keith Denley

An Interview With Jamal Smith

August 17th, 2016 | 10:33 am | Features & Interviews | 9 Comments

WorldChampion_Jamal

Photo by Nathan Éthier-Myette

Words by Zach Baker

Becoming a professional skateboarder seems pretty tough. You have to get really good at it, but it’s not about who’s the best. Everyone is too good for us to tell the difference at this point. The people who sustain themselves in skateboarding the longest are those with charisma and moxie — “something else.”

Jamal Smith has been exemplary in this regard, pretty much since the invention of YouTube. He finessed himself into the public eye with the Tornado Spin trick tip ten years ago. But, as evidenced by his Sabotage 4 opener, the new Palace clip, his pre-Glory Challenge pseudo-prize fighter Instagram campaign, and most importantly, getting on Stingwater, the dude has been especially feeling it as of the past year or so. I checked in with him outside of the Glory Challenge trying to roll a joint in the wind. He had just suffered a heart-wrenching loss to Wade Desarmo — but he was fine with it. His phone was blowing the fuck up. They both won.

+++++++

You just skated against defending titleholder Wade Desarmo in the the Dime World Championship Game of S.K.A.T.E. What was it like going into that for you?

It’s all about theatrics. At the end of the day, if you can put on a good show, it doesn’t matter who comes in first or last. But I mean, of course I wanted that $150,000 or whatever the fuck these Dime niggas are joking about. I was nervous as fuck though. I know I can’t kickflip and this nigga has all the kickflips.

When you saw the kickflip, what was going through your mind?

It was like everything went in slow motion. I felt every drop of sweat running down my face, I saw all the reactions, all the eyes on me. I had to turn inward, and I knew I was fucked.

You rattled off a couple tricks, right?

Yeah, because I’m that nigga. You spin to win. Unfortunately, I didn’t win.

Do you hope to battle him again next year?

Hell no. I’m just trying to smoke everybody else’s weed and watch motherfuckers huck their bodies down the biggest gaps onto swords and numchucks.

You live in Philadelphia?

Yeah, I’m originally from Ohio. I lived there until I was like 11. Then I lived in Massachusetts, and I lived in Ithaca [New York] after that.

Why’d you move around?

My mom passed when I was 11. I was a ward of the state, which meant I had no legal guardian and I had to stay in Ohio until I found someone who would take care of me. At the time, my sister was living in Massachusetts and took me in. I lived in Northampton, some weird little area in Western Massachusetts.

Did you start skating there?

Yeah, I want to say that I was maybe 14 when I started to really get into it. 11 to 13, I was on my Rocket Power shit, riding rollerblades, bikes, whatever the fuck, I didn’t care.