68 Degrees

November 24th, 2014 | 12:25 pm | Daily News | 6 Comments

watermelons

The Watermelon Man. Photo via Merchants of Ill.

Johnny Wilson still trying to pretend like he uses his VX1000.

Also, some guy compiled a bunch of Cyrus Bennett’s footage from the more recent video blogs and put it over a more recent Migos song.

As far as “Summer Trip to New York” clips go, the skating in this is tops by non-pro team clip standards. These dudes somehow skate every spot in New York (e.g. when was the last time someone filmed a line at Breezy Ledges? Jeff Pang in 1997?) Obligatory Wu-Tang song included.

“The new Transworld video, Outliers, as seen through the prism of the Malcolm Gladwell book of the same name.” Frozen in Carbonite looks through some prisms.

Cario Foster on his Reason part and Danny Montoya on his incredibly ahead-of-its-time One Step Beyond part. “For the record, filming is hard.”

Lucas and J.B. in the Cliché U.K. tour clip.

Twenty seconds of “lost” Jake Johnson footage. 360 flip noseblunts, etc.

Jordan Trahan apparently kickflipped into the Washington Square Park fountain.

We can officially verify that the Plan B video exists, and that PJ Ladd does not have a part in it. The joke is dead. Except how is Hoboken going to get a premiere and New York isn’t? Was really looking forward to getting drunk in the theater for that one :(

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This is what your 2015 MTA fare hike is going to look like.

QS Holiday Gift Guide: This pixel print of skate shoes from the nineties is chill and this Hans Moleman x Muska Silhouette deck is amazing. “My name is Hans. Drinking has ruined my life. I’m 31 years old!”

Spot Updates: 1) It happened months ago, but finally just got around to updating the spot page…the ledge-to-flatbar in Battery had its runway knobbed. Some Japanese guy with quick feet will still get a trick on it by next summer. 2) The grate at Union Square that people propped up to skate over the pillar is gone. It’s a gap now. 3) The Blue Banks in Albany are being turned into an official skatepark. Even if it ends up being some pre-fab crap, at least you get to skate the banks worry-free now. Funnest spot north of Tompkins :)

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: 6′ 3 Reggie Jackson v.s. 7′ 2 Brook Lopez.

Quote of the Week: “The first thing I thought when I started watching that catcalling video was, ‘Oh no, I hope I’m not in this.'” — T-Bird

No idea what the point of this will be, but yeah, it’s there for now.

24 For a Clean Shirt

April 21st, 2014 | 9:55 am | Daily News | 8 Comments

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New tees and a hoody restock now available in the QS webstore. Also available at Supreme New York / Los Angeles, Exit, Humidity, NJ Skateshop, One-Up, Commissary and Seasons this week. Available internationally soon. Support your local skate site.

“Well, if you’ve lived in Brooklyn for fifty years, you just know shit sometimes.” Volume 6 of Lurk NYC’s “New York Times” raw footage logs. Whoever tried the rail at 2:47 definitely didn’t live in Brooklyn for fifty years.

The remix of Grecco’s best part since Baker 2G is really good, as is Mike Anderson’s “surprise full part” at the end of Yellow Van Chronicles.

Kingpin interviewed one of this website’s heroes, Dani Lebron. (Relevant.)

Someone rounded up all of Robbie Gangemi’s footage for a dedicated remix video.

Hypebeast has another interview with Bill Strobeck, in which he reveals the story behind the guy smoking drugs at the Water Street Veteran’s Memorial alongside Anthony Pappalardo’s commentary, among other things.

Muckmouth is starting a multi-part series about what happens to talented, aspiring skaters when they realize a career as a professional skater just isn’t going to happen as a long-term thing. In the first installment, they caught up with Andy Stone, Brian Hoard (!), Malcolm Watson, and a not-talkative Lavar McBride.

A nice tribute to an incredibly underrated skater: 10 Tricks Danny Montoya Did First.

TWS put the spreads from their April 2014 “New Balance in New York” feature online.

The “cherry” crew at House of Vans & NJ Skateshop at House of Vans.

Paul Hintz’s part from the Westchester-based PFP3 video. Are pajamas the final frontier of pant decisions in skateboarding? Is there anything left?

A small blow to the upper tier of many broke skateboarders’ lifestyle: Chipotle will begin raising prices 3-5% this week. Not as big of a deal as when dollar menus became “value menus,” but still an unpleasant development for the underemployed.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Despite an awful shooting slump in Game 1, this is somehow the shot that Jamal Crawford hits.

Quote of the Week: “I heard they got a Wet Willy’s in AC. I gotta check that out…I might do that tomorrow.” — Carl Williams

Honest is really good, BTW. Big Boi or Big Gipp on a “Benz Friendz” remix or something would be cool ;)

Weekend Viewing: Rhythm Skateboards – “Genesis”

January 11th, 2013 | 8:52 am | Time Capsule | 10 Comments

genesis

On New Year’s Day, Ty Evans announced that Pretty Sweet will be his final video with the Girl family. It is unclear whether he is moving on from skate videos entirely, but it makes sense for a dude who directed a Super Bowl commercial to seek creative opportunities that do not involve chasing 20-year-olds down stair sets.

Despite all the bitching and moaning on behalf of nitpicky skate nerds everywhere, be it about excessive slow motion in the past two projects or just too many high fives, there is no denying that Ty Evans influenced skate videos more than anyone else in the past decade-and-a-half. His work propelled skate videos beyond bro-cam status and gave meaning to the concept of professional skateboard videography. With Evans “venturing out,” we are looking back at Rhythm Skateboards’ Genesis video, one of his earliest projects.

Released in 1997, Genesis was Rhythm’s first and only video. It was a follow-up to an eight-minute Rhythm montage at the end of Silver, the Planet Earth video that Evans made a year earlier. (Does anyone know if Silver was his first video?) Many hallmarks of future Ty Evans projects were already there: synth-heavy music supervision, female vocals, art direction based on staticky nineties technology (which would re-emerge in Transmission 7), and yes, occasionally a good bit of “lifestyle” filler between each trick.