Off Brand: A Quartersnacks D.I.Y. Spot Montage

November 7th, 2014 | 3:16 am | Video & Remixes | 4 Comments

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Beyond the unwritten rules and manual labor behind Shorty’s, at the end of the day, it’s simply just one of the best places to skate in the area. Quartersnacks has always been partial to skateboarding administered on low ledges and flatground, but we stepped out of our comfort zone and enlisted some independent contractors for the this edit. Between helping out with the build (which, by the way, already has a new extension on it and a clam shell forming in the corner), this is what we pulled through with. We tried to use to Luther Vandross Brick City Street Styles montage as a reference for this one, except it’s impossible to make something as good.

Thanks to Levi’s Skateboarding for their support in helping us leave something permanent behind at the spot :)

Alternate YouTube Link

Contributing filmers: Rob Harris & Johnny Wilson.

Back to the T.F!

Previously: Off Brand: A Quartersnacks D.I.Y. Build, Weekend at Shorty’s

P.S. If you’re wondering why Corey isn’t featured…here you go :(

Weekend at Shorty’s

October 23rd, 2014 | 5:50 am | Features & Interviews | 15 Comments

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Space in New York is a precious commodity. Lots rarely sit vacant, building foundations are never left undone, and an open area seldom exists without a security booth watching over its perimeter. The Volcano was an isolated incident. D.I.Y. in New York peaks at the B.Q.E. lot, where a few pillars form quarterpipes and banks, which then get backed into by trucks every few months and ruined. A wide open space is too precious for developers to neglect, and neglect is how every great D.I.Y. story begins.

Shorty’s is the most recognizable D.I.Y. spot the the greater New York metropolitan area today (first brought to the world’s attention by Fred Gall’s “Scum League” series), and it sits in an abandoned warehouse amid an industrial zone outside the city. The nearest train station is a thirty-minute skate away. Skateboarders need to go quite far to be left alone these days.

The spot was started by a bunch of locals living not-too-far-away, in the most ramshackle skate house imaginable. After eyeing the space, the original plan was to cement a few barriers and see how much they could get away with in incremental doses. The volatility with these sort of spaces is high: there’s never such thing as a truly “abandoned” space. All it takes is for one person with oversight to get pissed off about it. Luckily, that *knock-on-wood* hasn’t happened. Shorty’s began with a small volcano in February 2011, and has bloomed into three walls of obstacles.